$28.28 + $5.22 shipping
In Stock. Sold by Skymind Games

Other Sellers on Amazon
Add to Cart
$29.99
+ $5.80 shipping
Sold by: Antiquated Dreams
Add to Cart
$24.99
+ $11.10 shipping
Sold by: Neat Toys
Add to Cart
$32.99
+ $5.49 shipping
Sold by: Jon Barlow Books
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Color:
  • ThinkFun 36 Cube
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
  • To view this video download Flash Player
      

ThinkFun 36 Cube


Price: $28.28 + $5.22 shipping
Only 1 left in stock.
Ships from and sold by Skymind Games.
  • Only two simple rules
  • 6 levels of success
  • Brainteaser
  • Challenge your skills
  • For the whole family
8 new from $17.99 4 collectible from $11.95

Holiday Toy List
The Amazon 2014 Holiday Toy List showcases the latest and most-wished-for new and bestselling toys for the holiday season. Find toys from your favorite brands, such as Disney's Frozen, LEGO, Transformers, Elmo, Skylanders, Lionel trains and more. Shop now


Frequently Bought Together

ThinkFun 36 Cube + ThinkFun Gordians Knot + ThinkFun Adams Cube
Price for all three: $49.54

These items are shipped from and sold by different sellers.

Buy the selected items together


WARNING:
CHOKING HAZARD -- Small parts. Not for children under 3 yrs.

Product Details

  • Product Dimensions: 6.7 x 4.9 x 6.7 inches ; 7 ounces
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Shipping: Currently, item can be shipped only within the U.S. and to APO/FPO addresses. For APO/FPO shipments, please check with the manufacturer regarding warranty and support issues.
  • ASIN: B001F7VI30
  • Item model number: 6830
  • Manufacturer recommended age: 8 years and up
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #82,906 in Toys & Games (See Top 100 in Toys & Games)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (28 customer reviews)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images?.


Product Description

Product Description

How many towers can YOU place? Your goal is to place the 36 colored towers onto the puzzle base following two simple rules: there must be one and only one of each colored tower in each row and column, and the towers must fit in the base to form a perfect cube shape with all towers at the same height. Keep trying, see how many towers you can place before YOU get stuck!

From the Manufacturer

How many towers can you place? ThinkFun challenges you to solve our 36 Cube. Start by removing the towers following two simple rules: there must be only one of each colored tower in every row and column, and the towers must fit into the base so each tower is at the same height. Sound simple? Think again. There a 6 levels of success, so keep trying it to improve upon your previous effort.

Customer Questions & Answers

Customer Reviews

I knew I had tried LITERALLY every possible combination.
elise hammond
I would recommend this product to people who would like to challenge their mind while at the same time still enjoy themselves and have fun.
Scott
He enjoys the challenge and it is great to find something he can do on his own without assistance.
D. Mattingly

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

52 of 57 people found the following review helpful By Douglas Chin on January 1, 2010
My 11 year old son got a 36 cube for his birthday and played with it for many hours. From that standpoint, it's a reasonable toy. I found it interesting to think about just how difficult a puzzle this is. There are 6 different colors and each color has 6 pieces of 6 different heights. At first thought, there could be a huge number of possibilities but there are also posts that the pieces have to sit on and they constrain the possible locations of the colored pieces. The next paragraph of this review contains something that many would consider a spoiler but I feel it needs to be said. If you plan to buy this puzzle for someone else and have no intention of trying to solve it yourself, you should read on. If you think a good puzzle is one that is easy to understand but a challenge to solve, like a rubic's cube, you might want to read on because you might not like this puzzle.

ThinkFun describes this puzzle as having an Aha moment when solving it. There are many types of Aha moments, like the moment you realize a new way to deduce a value in Sudoku, or, when you realize you have been betrayed by someone you trusted. I enjoy the first type but not the second. Unfortunately, I consider the Aha moment in this puzzle to be in the second category. With this hint, some may want to stop reading here and take the challenge this puzzle offers.

After wondering how many combinations there really are in this puzzle, I decided to write a computer program to explore its possibilities. My program determined that there were no solutions. I checked my logic carefully and there were no mistakes. This prompted me to do a quick web search and I found that the Aha moment in the solution is when you realize that this puzzle is not what it first appears to be.
Read more ›
6 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By K. Butler on April 17, 2009
Verified Purchase
I purchased two of these puzzles for my classroom. My high school students love it! In fact, one of my juniors asked if he could take it home to work on it! It is highly engaging and promotes verbal communication - my students eagerly share their thinking and reasoning while trying to solve it (without any prompting from me!). So far, they have gotten all but two in place (on three separate occasions), so it is still "unsolved" after several weeks of attempts by at least eight individuals, six pairs, and five small groups of students! (Several students have made multiple attempts!) I plan to buy more to give as gifts for friends and relatives who like fun and challenging puzzles! It is well worth the investment!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Jeremy Slavkin on January 22, 2010
Verified Purchase
There is definately a solution. 24 solutions if you count all the variations in color once you find the height solution.

Fun for all ages. Our 4 year old was intrigued for a while. And even our 2 year old liked to stack the pieces (although the pieces are small so he could choke if not supervised).

I recommend solving one color at a time.

Spoiler alert (see below):

There is a hint provided by the manufacturer (puzzle itself provides a clue). I won't reveal the solution only to completely ruin the "fun" for all!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Jason Roy on November 20, 2009
Verified Purchase
I too am a high school math teacher and have a copy of this puzzle in my classroom! It is fantastic, the puzzle seems like it would be pretty easy at first but is actually deceptively difficult. Groups of students have worked on it throughout the past year, but it has only been solved once (by again a student who took it home over the weekend). The puzzle definitely encourages persistence and problem solving skills, and comes with a built in Aha moment... Ideal classroom puzzle.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Ashley on August 1, 2011
I bought this puzzle for my husband who loves puzzles. I couldn't understand why he gave up on solving it so quickly until several months later.

Although this is presented as a logic puzzle, it's not. Only when we came across the 36 officer problem did we realize that it's impossible to solve by logic- thus the reason my husband hated it.

There's a trick in the heights of the bases which makes it a "trick" puzzle and not a "logic" puzzle.

Blah.... not impressed.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Dr H on January 17, 2013
Verified Purchase
I purchased several of these as gifts and kept one for myself. After working on it for almost two hours and getting 34 of the 36 pegs placed correctly several times, something started to bug me about it. So I cracked out an old math book, and sure enough, the 36-Cube is an example of Euler's "36-officers" problem.

The catch is, the 36-officers problem has been proven to be insoluble.

This caused me to take a closer look at the physical construction of the puzzle, and, sure enough, there is a trick. It's the nature of that trick which caused my disappointment. This is presented as a logic puzzle, but it's not really a logic puzzle. The solution depends on the chance discovery of a physical anomaly in the way the puzzle pieces are built. There is absolutely no hint of this in the "two rules" given for the puzzle, and the "solution" is akin to finding out that you need to put a round peg in a square hole.

To me this is like someone handing you a crossword puzzle, and you can get /almost/ all the words except for one or two -- and then they tell you that even though all the clues are in English all the answers are supposed to be in French. There isn't any particluar reason why you would expect this, since English puzzles typically have English clues and French puzzles have French clues. Yes, you might accidentally stumble on the key, but it would pretty much have to be by accident, because the key has nothing to do with the typical rules and expectations involved in solving crossword puzzles.

Unfortunately, this is true of the 36 cube.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews