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4.2 out of 5 stars
Think: Straight Talk for Women to Stay Smart in a Dumbed-Down World
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43 of 46 people found the following review helpful
on July 14, 2011
Format: Kindle EditionVerified Purchase
This book gave me a rude awakening. I found myself questioning the things I knew... Lisa was right. I could name more Kardashians (all of them) before I could name a correct level of government. I knew nothing of any world events. But I definitely knew about Brangelina, Speidi, etc. Throughout reading this book, my ears perked up, and I found myself reading something Lisa said and going to google it to find out how true it actually was! Haha! When I finished this book, I started reading her recommended books and I love them. They're not something I would EVER pick out for myself, but she suggested the right books to give me more information on topics I should probalby know more about. I should know what I'm eating instead of being ignorant as to how it got to my plate. I should know more about world events and what goes on in other countries, and it's lead me to writing to our Prime Minister, Stephen Harper. It's sparked educated discussions with my husband, family and friends. THings I oculd have never talked about before. I would say this is the most awakening, real, and motivating book I've ever read. But it does mean taking a look at, and changing, some tough things I've accepted about myself for 25 years - celebrity media and start reading the newspaper.
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86 of 98 people found the following review helpful
on July 2, 2011
Format: Hardcover
I enjoyed some aspects of this book, but question some of the premises. I will begin with what I got out of it, then move on to aspects that I believe bear more discussion, if not scrutiny.
First, some of the solutions were clever and very practical. "Cross-reading," that is, reading something you disagree with or is written from a viewpoint other than your own is terrific advice. I will try to pick up an occasional one of those. The book reads well, and I enjoyed her personal passages about her grandmother, mother and father. We'd all do well to think about the origins of our world view. Another major point we are in agreement over is that the media does not cover important issues adequately. The insipid and banal stories some mainstream news outlets serve up should make the editors blush.
The aspects I am not on board with follow: First, the breathless tone of some of the statements remind me of Wolf Blitzer jazzing you up with excitement with that piercing disaster-reporting tone. Usually after he has your ear, you realize he is talking about something quite mundane. Second, Bloom's statement about how only beautiful people get friends and get ahead in this society does not ring true to me. I just tossed the barely-used tube of lipstick I bought when I got married over thirty years ago. I don't wear makeup and am only dimly aware of current fashion. I have never lacked for friends or been passed over for a promotion. One should be clean and tidy, yes, but wear makeup and have plastic surgery? That is overstatement. Finally, I fail to see the harm in watching reality tv. It is not my cup of tea, but, like the weather, it gives afficionados something to discuss and therefore provides social lubrication. I am surprised some women still wear high heels after we worked so hard to get out of the compulsory mini-skirts of my youth. But Ms. Bloom, they are OPTIONAL today. And I fail to see a correlation between them and lack of thinking. There are equal numbers of thoughtful young women in heels and vapid creatures in flats.
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40 of 44 people found the following review helpful
on May 12, 2011
Format: Hardcover
This book was not only captivating to read in one sitting, but it also had a lasting impact and has evolved my perspective on decisions I make in my own life and also the role I play in the collective. I am so grateful for the author taking a stand for the fullest expression of each woman by tapping into her powerful ability to think. Imagine a whole world of women who read this book and remembered the importance of tapping into their own ideas, big dreams, desires and finding the place where they want to use their gifts to make a positive impact in the world. Imagine all these powerful women rising up vs. being weak, uninformed and allowing themselves to be herded by modern media to buy this, not eat that and look like everyone else. Our world needs people to wake up and to innovate and this book is the perfect wake-up call for us all to reclaim the joy of life through our ability to use our mind. A great gift for any woman, any age.
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44 of 53 people found the following review helpful
on August 23, 2012
Format: PaperbackVerified Purchase
I thought this would be a good book to share with my 11 year old daughter -- to show her truly how to "Think in a Dumbed-Down World." In Ms. Bloom's 200 page book, she spends 100 pages talking about how dumb Americans are. Anyone who picks up this book already agrees with this thesis. She then painstakingly and repetitively details a myriad of examples of how truly dumb we are. Once again, agreed! But before the end of her explaining her thesis, I have learned more vapid information about Angelina Jolie, Britney Spears and Lindsay Lohan than I EVER wanted to know.

Then her solution -- READ -- which we do [I bought your book!]. And her solution if you don't have time to read: "don't do housework, cook simply, enforce bedtime..." Really!?! I spent $10 for this. I think the only person benefiting from this book is Ms. Bloom herself.

One of her rules is "if you find a book you don't like -- put it down!" That is exactly what I did. Also, I have never posted a review on Amazon and find myself doing so tonight to save all you other smart women and mothers from making the same mistake.
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24 of 28 people found the following review helpful
on May 17, 2011
Format: Hardcover
Whenever I hear Lisa Bloom speak, I know I'll get the straight story backed up by logic, facts and years of experience. Now, with this book, I can refer to Lisa whenever I face a dilemma. This book has already helped me explain the right path to my daughter and talk my friend out of a harmful decision. It pays for itself in just one smart move you might have missed. I am looking forward to the paperback so I can keep it in my handbag at all times.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
on July 18, 2011
Format: HardcoverVerified Purchase
Loved this book! Every woman, especially women with girls, needs to read this book and embrace her intelligence and her full potential. Inspired to continue to grow, and after reading this I've decided, that although I'm 45, I'm not too old to keep learning and growing...I'm starting my PhD in the fall.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful
on October 11, 2011
Format: Hardcover
I first heard about Lisa Bloom from a Huffington Post piece she'd written about encouraging girls to use their brains by talking about books with them as opposed to complimenting them on their looks. When I saw that she'd written a whole book about this, I had to get it. Unfortunately, there were not enough of those types of stories and there was more of a "it's my way or the highway" vibe with this book.

While some of her arguments and solutions are interesting, Bloom spends too much time trying to force feed her opinions onto the masses. Yes, she's a vegetarian who cares about global issues, but there are people out there who love meat and who care equally about the trials and tribulations people in our nation go through. She mentions "pretty missing white girl" syndrome and yes, I feel the media is horrible about giving more attention to that demographic than others, but other than briefly mentioning three minority boys, what could she suggest to counter that? I will suggest an online forum called "Black and Missing but Not Forgotten," which does highlight cases of missing black people. I'm surprised she didn't know about them.

I did learn more about Angelina Jolie's humanitarian efforts from reading Bloom's book, but instead of focusing on someone who's also known for her looks and acting, why didn't Bloom focus on someone who is solely a humanitarian and who doesn't get any media attention at all? I think Bloom's stuck in a conundrum---she claims she wants to change how women in this world think but she's unfortunately caught up in that mess to a degree, being a member of said media herself.

I thought it was a ridiculous solution to tell her overworked female friends to "hire a housekeeper," when it sounds like these women have husbands and children that could have chores delegated to them. Also, her recommended reading list is limited to certain types of books. I noticed she listed more dour books and maybe three or so humorous books. I have read Nicholas Kristof's Times columns, and have read Ayaan Hirsi Ali's books and Jeannette Walls's memoir, all of which she mentions frequently in this book. While her recommended books list may be all fine and dandy for her, I still need a balance with more levity.

I think this book was written for Bloom to showcase herself, with the smartening up of women being an afterthought. Had she written this solely about herself without trying to peddle it to another demographic, I would've given it a higher rating. (Though I'm sure if she did that she'd get negative reviews for being so "me-me-me.")

This book reminded me that I am a woman who thinks and who has her own opinion, and one who is glad that she didn't fall for this author's method of trying to get her readers to conform to her standards.
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17 of 20 people found the following review helpful
on May 12, 2011
Format: HardcoverVerified Purchase
Wow -- Lisa Bloom is a force of nature -- smart, funny, informative, and she pulls no punches. I hate the tired cliche' "must-read", but this IS a must-read for women and girls, parents of girls, teachers and mentors of girls, people who like girls. . . okay, everyone. This book shows why caring about good education is more important than caring about how your butt looks in those jeans. And it makes you laugh at the same time!
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on July 3, 2011
Format: HardcoverVerified Purchase
Pretty well written and witty. Lisa Bloom gets straight to the point. Informative and entertaining at the same time. All young college women should read this book; it would give them something to think about and an opportunity to broaden their horizon.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon July 12, 2011
Format: Hardcover
My father-in-law has a simple note pinned to the door that leads to his garage. It reads : THINK.
The simple word is meant to help him remember the things he needs to take with him when he leaves the house to run errands. One final reminder to check to make sure he didn't forget the checks he needs to deposit at the bank or the the books he means to return to the library.

Lisa Bloom's recently published book Think : Straight Talk for Women to Stay Smart in A Dumbed-Down World is a reminder for women to use our brains. Quite simply, to think.

You probably already know Lisa Bloom. I didn't. I don't watch television and so I haven't seen her as a legal analyst on shows like The Early Show and Dr. Phil's or on CNN. I just got acquainted with her in this book. Ms. Bloom and I are on opposite sides of the political spectrum. We don't see eye-to-eye on many issues. However, on a few very important things we absolutely agree.

We both agree that women are smart. Women have amazing brains and are capable of doing most everything. Unfortunately, so many of us fail to use our brains to think. As Bloom points out in her book, too many women become overly enmeshed and concerned with pop culture. We know everything about the personal lives of celebrities, yet ignore the crises and horrors taking place around the world. We are too focused and spend too much time and money on our appearance, even risking our lives and health for dangerous procedures and the perfect tan. And many women think it is actually better to be "hot" than "smart". One third of the population won't read a single book after graduating from high school. SAY IT ISN'T SO!

As Bloom writes in her hard-hitting, honest style, it's hard not to be defensive. Really. Even so, her arguments ring true and even though I think I use my brain quite a bit, I know there are always ways I can use it more. Obviously.

In spite of our political differences, by the time I got to the section about books (hello! read more good books, people), I felt like Lisa Bloom and I were old friends chatting about our favorites. She and I also have similar parenting styles or at least a style I am attempting to apply in my home. Bloom even mentions my personal favorite parenting expert Wendy Mogel. (Read my review of her fabulous book The Blessing of a Skinned Knee.)

Lisa Bloom is funny. She points out the obvious with a wicked wit. I chuckled out loud several times and then read whole sections aloud for Utah Dad's enjoyment and enlightenment.

Bloom's advice is brilliant and simple and frankly rather straight forward if you think about it. Following her suggestions and using your brain more will help you be happier, smarter and will even help the world be a better place. You have a brain. Use it.
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