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29 of 37 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars No need to think twice: this one's terrific
Wow...it's good to have the original cast back again, making progress in their lives but tougher than ever. This time Scottoline tells the tale from the perspective of Bennie Rosato, owner of the all-woman law firm where Mary and Judy work. There's also Anne, who appeared briefly in an earlier novel, but she is conveniently on vacation in this volume...
Published on January 27, 2010 by Dr. Cathy Goodwin

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95 of 106 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Very, very disappointing
I've been a long-time Scottoline fan, owning all of her books, most in First Edition hardback. I've corresponded personally with Lisa, and she's a charming and very nice person. I've really enjoyed spending time in the world of Bennie Rosato and her associates. It's very painful for me to say that I didn't like this book very much at all.

I understand the...
Published on January 29, 2010 by Brian Baker


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95 of 106 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Very, very disappointing, January 29, 2010
By 
Brian Baker (Santa Clarita, CA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Think Twice (Rosato & Associates) (Hardcover)
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I've been a long-time Scottoline fan, owning all of her books, most in First Edition hardback. I've corresponded personally with Lisa, and she's a charming and very nice person. I've really enjoyed spending time in the world of Bennie Rosato and her associates. It's very painful for me to say that I didn't like this book very much at all.

I understand the artistic urge to take an established character into new and uncharted territory. It keeps it fresh for the author as well as, hopefully, the reader. But as with any risk, there's always the chance of failure.

In general, I don't think much of the doppelganger device in literature and movies. It has been used successfully - and rarely - to illustrate issues of morality and the duality of human nature, but there's a reason the phrase "evil twin" has become such a clichéd joke in our lexicon.

I didn't care all that much for the previous book in which Bennie's twin sister was introduced - it seemed contrived - and this book takes the whole thing way over the top.

The Bennie Rosato of the series is a cool and self-controlled character, with plenty of sang froid to spare, a woman who knows what she wants and how to achieve it. The Bennie in this book is completely unglued, running around like a lunatic with her hair on fire. The pacing and structure of the book reflect this frenzy: my Advance Reader's Copy has 371 pages divided into 128 chapters. Do the math; that works out to 2.9 pages per chapter. This book reads more like a movie script than a novel, and suffers accordingly. There's no real sense of setting in any of the scenes, no inner dialogues to speak of, a pretty complete lack of the kind of narrative of which Scottoline has proven she's capable.

I found the idea that these two women could change places so easily and successfully, given their respective lives, completely unbelievable. The idea that Alice - the "evil twin" - could simply step in and run a successful law firm without any formal legal training was, to me, preposterous.

There were other problems: WAY too much of Mary Di Nunzio's parents, for example, minor "characters" good as comedic foils in previous books, but far too overexposed here. A visiting "Italian aunt" who seems to have psychic powers and serves as a Deus ex machina device. Other things, but I think you get the idea.

Lisa, I know you sometimes read the Amazon reviews. I'm sorry, but I have to call it like I see it.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars And 1 Star is Generous, August 14, 2010
This review is from: Think Twice (Rosato & Associates) (Hardcover)
First let me admit two things up front;

1. I'm a big fan of Lisa Scottoline, have read all of her previous novels, and have enjoyed them very much, especially the Rosato and Associates ones.

2. I did not finish "Think Twice". I couldn't. It's dreadful. I stuck it out until page 202 but then couldn't stand the thought of reading another page, let alone another of those short, choppy chapters. The plot path she was taking was obvious, and I no longer cared what happened to a character I always had cared a great deal about in the past.

The evil twin part is bad enough, but we've seen Alice before. It's the use of two of the worst possilble plot elements that made this a second (or third or tenth) rate work. They are, first, the overuse of coincidence and, second, that everyone is suddenly struck stupid. They are the hallmarks of bad writing and of authors who no longer care or are no longer able to write anything worth reading. I was incredibly disappointed that one of my favorite authors would stoop so low. It was like reading one of those awful "Ludlum novels" that "he" wrote years after his death. (Or, even worse, one of the Van Lustbadder Bourne novels.)

This book raises an interesting question. Did Lisa Scottoline really write "Think Twice"? Maybe she has an evil twin who took her place and wrote this mess. Maybe every one around her is too stupid to figure this out. That would be more plausable than anything that happened in this book.

The plot involves Bennie Rosato's twin sister replacing her and everyone who knows Bennie either being on vacation (by coincidence) or too wrapped up in their own agendas (due to sudden stupidity syndrome) to tell the difference. Bennie herself joins the idiot parade, which includes her previously intelligent associates Mary and Judy. This is particularly evident on the above mentioned page 202. It was at this point that all Bennie had to was ask the cops to fingerprint her to prove who she is, or at least who she isn't. Instead, she runs away. I realze that proving her identity on page 202 would have ended the book around page 215, and you can't sell a book that short. However, I didn't care enough to see if she got caught to continue reading.

And does anyone really believe Bennie's dog was put down? I didn't finish the book, but I suspect the ex boy friend went back and paid for the operation. I'm sure that was intended to be the big, surprise, heart breaking ending.

I doubt Lisa Scottoline reads these reviews, but just in case she does: Lisa, you should be ashamed of herself for writing this. The worst part about the everyone is struck stupid plot device is that the author assumes everyone reading the book is stupid as well. Of course, she may be right about this more than she's wrong. Look at how many reviewers in here thought this mess was good and, even worse, original.

Lisa Scottoline owed her readers, many of us loyal for years, better than this. We have come to expect a lot from her. Instead we got something that seems to have been thrown together in time to beat a contractual deadline. One wonders if we will all "Think Twice" before ever trusting her with our money or time again.
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21 of 24 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars improbable, at best!, February 14, 2010
This review is from: Think Twice (Rosato & Associates) (Hardcover)
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I have have liked the other Scottoline's that I have read before - but not this one! The story is just too unbelievable. The evil twin takes over Bennie's life almost without a hitch! She knows the law with just a quick glance at a case. She is a computer expert who ferrets out passwords and masters international banking without difficulty. Not in this or any other lifetime! There are just a plethora of skills that nasty Alice manages without getting caught immediately. No one seems to realize the differences in Bennie's new, i.e. nicer, personality. It is too much of a stretch to consider. Bennie is a tough cookie who takes no nonsense from anyone. The Alice clone is not believable.
Topping this is the over-the-top DeNunzio Italian stereotypes. Basta, girl! The ethnic group isn't all spaghetti and Nona Stregas! Mary's family is almost a lousy t.v. sit com. This is not a book that I could recommend.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Too Idiotic, December 11, 2010
This review is from: Think Twice (Rosato & Associates) (Hardcover)
This is the first time I have felt compelled to review a book. I have read all of Lisa Scottoline's previous books and have really liked them. I don't think I can manage to make it through to the end of this one. The character of Bennie is usually so in charge and take charge and not so in Think Twice. She stumbles in and out of such stupid situations I actually felt like I was reading a soap opera plot. This is one that people shouldn't waste their money on. Hopefully, this series can continue in the way it started...and not end on this sad note.
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29 of 37 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars No need to think twice: this one's terrific, January 27, 2010
This review is from: Think Twice (Rosato & Associates) (Hardcover)
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
Wow...it's good to have the original cast back again, making progress in their lives but tougher than ever. This time Scottoline tells the tale from the perspective of Bennie Rosato, owner of the all-woman law firm where Mary and Judy work. There's also Anne, who appeared briefly in an earlier novel, but she is conveniently on vacation in this volume.

Scottoline's trademark is putting people in impossible situations and watching them carry it off. One she had a lawyer pretend to be an employee of another law firm. This time, she has Bennie's twin sister, Alice, impersonating Bennie.

It all begins when Bennie tries to be supportive of her troubled twin, accepting a dinner invitation where Alice claims to be living. Bennie foils Alice's attempt to kill her but then (as the reader will expect) Bennie's troubles really begin. She has to convince the cops that's she's Bennie, not Alice, which is hard to do when she's dressed like Alice. She has to stop Alice's elaborate scheme to steal her life.

Scottoline really hammers the reader. She juggles character viewpoints smoothly and convincingly. Her tone changes when we switch among Alice, Mary and Bennie. Mary and Judy are consistent with the characters Scottoline created in her very first book. We know just enough about Judy to keep interested. For a moment I thought we'd get to meet Judy's parents but no: we get more than enough of Mary's family. Let's just say that Judy's role in the plot was not surprising, given her character.

Following mystery conventions, Scottoline ends every chapter with a cliffhanger. She introduces, for the first time I can remember in the series, something new in the character of Fiorella, a distant cousin who claims to be a witch.

A finicky reader might complain about two points. First one character turns up a little too conveniently on the scene; however, this character creates a special test for Alice's deception and ultimately affects mostly Bennie's dog, Bear. Second, there was a lot of discussion about Mary becoming a partner in Bennie's firm, but wasn't Mary made partner in the very first book in the series, with a different firm? Wouldn't Mary and Judy remember so being made a partner would feel different the second time around? .

Alas, this is one of those books that's hard to put down, yet leaves the reader sorry it's over at the end.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars To what length would you go to regain and prove your identity?, February 6, 2010
This review is from: Think Twice (Rosato & Associates) (Hardcover)
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
I normally don't end up reading Lisa Scottoline's books when they first come out. No real reason... just don't tend to pick up on them early. But when Amazon Vine had her latest, Think Twice, up for review, I figured I'd get an early jump on this one. Think Twice is an interesting concept using twins to show how low someone might be able to go to regain their identity. I probably lost a bit of the impact given that the characters have a history from other books that I didn't read, but it was still an enjoyable book nonetheless.

The plot revolves around Bennie Rosato and her twin sister Alice Connolly. Bennie is the successful lawyer who has the money through careful living. Alice is her twin sister with an evil streak that runs very deep. Bennie successfully defended Alice from a murder charge awhile back, but they still are not close by any stretch. Alice lures Bennie to her "home" for a dinner gathering, basically to just "catch up." Alice has different plans, however. She drugs Bennie's drink and proceeds to box her up and bury her, pretty much thinking she'll die a cruel and slow death. Meanwhile, Alice steals Bennie's identity and impersonates her just long enough to get an off-shore account set up to transfer three million dollars. As a con artist, she's *almost* fully convinced everyone that she really is Bennie, but there are a few lingering doubters still left. And what she didn't plan on was Bennie somehow surviving her burial and returning to hunt her down with a score to settle...

Overall, Think Twice was an enjoyable read. Yes, there's a bit of "suspension of reality" that needs to occur, but it's a novel... just go with it. It also made you think about what it might be like to have no way to prove you are who you say you are, especially when someone else has taken over your identity and convinced everyone that you're someone else. A few of the secondary characters seemed to be missing some development, but I can chalk that up to this being a series of novels using the same people, and me not having read the previous ones. When Think Twice makes it out to your bookstore, it'd be worth the read.

Disclosure:
Obtained From: Amazon Vine Review Program
Payment: Free
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Horrible, July 17, 2010
By 
Mom24 "Sue" (Cambridgeshire, UK) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Think Twice (Rosato & Associates) (Hardcover)
I've always enjoyed the author's books, but this one was horrible! Weak story, unbelieveable, definately not up to par with the author's other books. Very disappointing!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Serious Identity Theft, April 7, 2011
When one twin steals the identity of the other, it's all too easy to move ahead with a deadly and devious plot to take over all bank accounts, the house, the boy friend, and the law firm. Another Scottoline gem! Don't miss it!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Grabbed Me Early, but Later Chapters Left Me Wondering, April 15, 2010
By 
Gregg Eldred (Avon Lake, OH USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Think Twice (Rosato & Associates) (Hardcover)
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
A friend has read many of Lisa Scottoline's books and I have read his reviews with interest. However, it wasn't until her most recent book, Think Twice, was offered to me that I decided that the time was right to experience her writing. It was an excellent book, until I hit the later chapters.

Benedetta "Bennie" Rosato is a very successful lawyer, who owns her own law firm. Her identical twin, Alice Connolly, is the opposite; a con artist, drug dealer, murderer. Shortly after the birth of the twins, their mother put one up for adoption, Alice. Alice's parents gave her everything. While Bennie's mother struggled to cope with her life and slipped slowly into dementia, A few years before the start of this book, Bennie successfully defended Alice against murder charges, however everyone could tell that Alice was bad. Under guise of reconcilement, Alice invites Bennie to her house. After drugging her, Alice buries Bennie alive and proceeds to steal her identity and her money. Alice does a good job of impersonating Bennie, but a couple of Bennie's coworkers are not convinced that she is Bennie. Finally, Alice never anticipated that her twin could actually escape, or once she did, have revenge on her mind.

The early chapters are excellent; the plot, the characters, the action, all flow easily and naturally. Scottoline does a great job of moving the story along, while increasing the suspense. As Alice impersonates Bennie and starts to assume her life, it was believable. It was also scary at how well Alice was able to accomplish this, once she found Bennie's passwords, adjusted her appearance, and performed some basic social networking. The parallels to the current internet environment were striking. The sense of Bennie's situation was driven home when, at every corner, she would discover that Alice was still a step ahead. It was easy to empathize with Bennie, which made her circumstance more desperate. A few of the secondary characters were introduced, developed a little, and then left to wander until the final chapters. When they made their final appearance, it was as if they materialized out of thin air. I suppose it would have been best just to suspend belief and allow the story to wash over me. Overall, Think Twice is a very good introduction to Lisa Scottoline and because of this book, I will start reading her earlier novels.

Disclosure:
Obtained from: Amazon Vine Review Program
Payment: Free
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Oh yes you do have to think twice before considering whether to waste precious time on this book, September 19, 2010
This review is from: Think Twice (Rosato & Associates) (Hardcover)
I haven't read a book quite this bad in a long time, and once again I notice when reading a terrible book that there is an author note at the end. Unfortunately even with the guilting I cannot hold back from a scathing review.

The book begins with the introduction of twins, nobody and nobody. One is an ultra-slut, the other a prim and proper successful lawyer. As predicted by the blurb, prim is drugged and thrown in a coffin, while slutty goes out and steals her life.

The story continues from here like a slap-stick comedy. Slutty repeatedly tries to sleep with Prim's boyfriend, impossibly manages to fake her way as partner lawyer (and almost steal every cent of Prim's money). Aside from all this being so unbelievable, it's all just so terribly predictable. Even once Prim gets free, she struggles to convince others of her identity (quick fact: even identical twins have different fingerprints) as everyone she knows is on vacation (way to add plot tension woah!)

Worst of all we spend far too much time with Prim's associate, half of her family, and all her real-estate and boyfriend issues, as if the author thought that between the identity theft and potential murder that we needed some character development. I admit something was needed to save this plot, but mundane minor characters is not it.

Like all cheese-fests, the books ends without any hard choices, terrible consequences, or any tragedy to speak of. In fact if the author had ended with the line "and they all lived happily ever after" I think it would have made the novel marginally better.
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Think Twice (Rosato & Associates)
Think Twice (Rosato & Associates) by Lisa Scottoline (Hardcover - March 16, 2010)
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