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Thinking. Loving. Doing.: A Call to Glorify God with Heart and Mind Paperback – September 8, 2011


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Thinking. Loving. Doing.: A Call to Glorify God with Heart and Mind + Inquiring After God: Classic and Contemporary Readings (Blackwell Readings in Modern Theology) + A Survey of the Old Testament
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 176 pages
  • Publisher: Crossway (September 8, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1433526514
  • ISBN-13: 978-1433526510
  • Product Dimensions: 8.4 x 5.5 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (64 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #201,385 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

I found this book to be a fascinating, challenging, insightful, practical, and surprisingly personal discussion of how Christians can grow in both knowledge and love. --Wayne Grudem, Research Professor of Bible and Theology, Phoenix Seminary, Phoenix, Arizona

I know most of the contributors of this book pretty well. A couple of them I am glad to call friends. And a couple of them, to be honest, I have found myself at odds with on a few occasions. But thats why I like this book. It shows the possibility for civil discourse, and it reminds us that its just as important to be nice as it is to be right. Allow it to move you closer to Jesus and closer to the poor. So read it and then think. love. and act. --Shane Claiborne, cofounder, The Simple Way; author, The Irresistible Revolution --This text refers to the Audio CD edition.

Review

“I found this book to be a fascinating, challenging, insightful, practical, and surprisingly personal discussion of how Christians can grow in both knowledge and love.”
Wayne Grudem, Research Professor of Theology and Biblical Studies, Phoenix Seminary

“I know most of the contributors of this book pretty well. A couple of them I am glad to call friends. And a couple of them, to be honest, I have found myself at odds with on a few occasions. But that’s why I like this book. It shows the possibility for civil discourse, and it reminds us that it’s just as important to be nice as it is to be right. Allow it to move you closer to Jesus and closer to the poor. So read it and then—think. love. and act.”
Shane Claiborne, cofounder, The Simple Way; author, The Irresistible Revolution


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Customer Reviews

This book is short, but very challenging.
William D. Curnutt
This book is actually a collection of essays/chapters by such heavyweights as RC Sproul, Francis Chan and yes, even Rick Warren.
Keith G
Our minds are powerful instruments that God has given us to love Him and love others.
Reid Mccormick

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on December 20, 2011
Format: Paperback
The book is set up as follows:
Chapter 1: The Battle for Your Mind- Rick Warren
Chapter 2: The Way the World Thinks- R. Albert Mohler Jr.
Chapter 3: Thinking Deeply in the Ocean of Revelation- R. C. Sproul
Chapter 4: Thinking for the Sake of Global Faithfulness- Thabiti Anyabwile
Chapter 5: Think Hard, Stay Humble- Francis Chan
Conclusion: Thinking for the Sake of Joy- John Piper
Q&A with the contributors

As you can see above, this book is a compilation. Some chapters are stronger than others, and some chapters will "connect" more with the readers than others. I enjoyed this book, as it challenged the way I think and explained how my thought life affects the way I love and express that love to others.

In Chapter 1, Rick Warren starts the book off strong by emphasizing the importance of thought in the Christian life. He points out that the heart is deceitful, our thinking is darkened, and we must take every thought captive and hold it up to the light of the Word. Since "wise men store up knowledge" (Pr 10:14), Warren lays out and explains the five levels of learning: knowledge, wisdom, conviction, character, and skill. He ends with a challenge to test every thought, hold onto salvation and God's promises, nourish a godly mind, and continue to learn.

In Chapters 2 and 3, Mohler and Sproul compare and contrast Christian thinking with Western worldviews of thought and belief. I get the feeling these chapters were meant to be apologetic. While they are too short and simplistic and reductionist to provide a proper apologetic to those who are looking for answers, I do think that it offers a decent cursory overview for those in the church wondering how their beliefs differ from those outside the church. It's a starting point.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Tom Carpenter VINE VOICE on April 5, 2013
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
The book could have used more thinking. It could have been written with more love. It could have been edited with more doing. It feels like several sermons combined together - even worse - sermons by different preachers, because that's what it is. Sadly, it's not even the best I've seen at this process. Don't be fooled by the inclusion of Piper's name in large letters, this is not even close to the writing you've come to expect in one of his books. That being said, it is filled with important and valuable information - it's just that the information is disjointed and even, at times, somewhat contradictory.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By David P. Craig TOP 1000 REVIEWER on September 30, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is a compilation of several outstanding pastoral addresses given by experienced Christian leaders from a recent Desiring God Conference on the theme of balancing the mind, the heart (emotions), and the hands. I will seek to summarize what each chapter/leader addresses in their specific topic of choice and what I benefited from in my reading of each chapter:

The Introduction is written by David Mathis (an elder at Bethlehem Baptist Church in Minneapolis). He makes a helpful distinction between churches that focus on being pure and those that focus on unity and encourages those who lean one way or the other to learn from the other side. He then proceeds to use Dr. John Frames helpful distinctions of tri-perspectivalism, whereby some churches emphasis The Kingly role, some the Priestly role, and others the Prophetic role of Christ. He then sets up the following chapters in the book and shows how each contributes to bring balance to how we can love Christ with our minds, hearts, and hands.

I personally really enjoyed this chapter as it caused me to reflect on my own strengths and weaknesses in my personal and corporate involvement in the body of Christ and what I have to offer others and what I can learn from others in becoming more Christ-like in balancing the tri-perspectivalism as described in the chapter via John Frames helpful schema.

Chapter Two is entitled "The Battle for Your Mind" by Rick Warren (everyone knows who he is - if you are on planet Earth). He does a topical study from the Scriptures on the pitfalls we wrestle with in the battle between our ears, and then proceeds to give four principles on thinking; five levels of learning; and five things to remember when we are teaching others.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By M. Rodriguez VINE VOICE on January 30, 2012
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I was very excited about reading this book b/c I think it's great to figure out ways to put my faith into practice. I was a little disappointed when I started reading. There is very little continuity from one chapter to the next-I know that these were all written by different scholars and pastors, but I was hoping there would be a more continual thread holding them together. When I finished the book and read the Acknowledgment section I figured out the reason this book seems so disjointed-it thanks the 5 contributors for speaking at a conference in 2010 and then helping add and edit their sermons for the book. While a lot of speakers, pastors, and scholars are doing this now, most of them do it with a sermon series all by the same speaker. Because this book has 5 very different types of speakers, and you can't actually physically hear the differences each one uses in speaking styles (inflections, tones, etc.) it seems choppy.

Some of the essays (R.C. Sproul's in particular) were incredibly insightful and really helped me look at things in a different way. I agree with the whole point of the book being that as Christians we need to be intellectually engaging our faith, not just believing something or someone simply b/c they claim their ideas are Biblical. There was one essay that really didn't fit at all. Thabiti Anyabwile's piece on Islam was actually offensive. Not b/c it was so convicting that I felt moved, but b/c it assumes I'm scared of Muslims and the religion of Islam. He makes a good point (and what I guess was his main idea, although it was hard to tell b/c of the way it is written) is simply that yes, all people are created equal, but not all ideas are-IE we shouldn't be assuming that all religions have the same goals as Christianity.
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