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Third Man Out


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Product Details

  • Actors: Chad Allen, Sebastian Spence, Jack Wetherall, Woody Jeffreys, Sean Young
  • Directors: Ron Oliver
  • Writers: Mark Saltzman, Richard Stevenson
  • Producers: Barry Krost, James Shavick, Kirk Shaw, Paul Colichman, Randall H. Zalken
  • Format: Color, Widescreen, NTSC
  • Language: English
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.78:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: Unrated
  • Studio: Liberation Ent
  • DVD Release Date: August 8, 2006
  • Run Time: 99 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (57 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000FZEU1K
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #74,040 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "Third Man Out" on IMDb

Special Features

None.

Editorial Reviews

A gay detective is hired to find who has been been threatening a notorious member of the gay community noted for outing people. First in a series, based on the novels by Richard Stevenson and set in Albany, NY, rather than in "the big city."

Customer Reviews

The acting was very good and story line was great.
Roller
The plots thickens and surprises are everywhere just as good detective mysteries should have.
Grady Harp
In this film, "Donald and Tim", are a modern couple that today's gay audience can relate to.
Daniel White

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

86 of 96 people found the following review helpful By A. Hickman on August 2, 2006
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
This is one of the most satisfying "gay" films I've seen since "Beautiful Thing," and one of the best mystery-married pairings since John and Sherlock, or should I say Nick and Nora. It's the story of Donald Strachey, tough guy P.I. with a shady past and a sweet tooth for guy pal Sebastian Spence. It's a good story, not a great one, with a sultry jazz score and topical references to such controversial subjects as celebrity outing and pedophiliac priests. What makes it work is the unconventional casting of Chad Allen (who is gay himself, but whose somewhat beat-up good looks don't conform to cinematic stereotypes of gay--although one character dubs him "Nancy-boy Drew") as Strachey, who just happens to be very happily married to Timothy (played by Sebastian Spence, who is apparently straight, and maybe that's why his character overdoes the nelly a bit). Allen, as Strachey, is developing very nicely as an actor, and he's more interesting looking now than he ever was as a child. In "Third Man Out," he gets solid support from QAF's Jack Wetherall and Sean Young. Apparently, this is the first in a series, based on the novels by Richard Stevenson and set, contrarily, in Albany, rather than in New York City or San Francisco. Hopefully, it will prove popular enough with its intended audience that other books in the series will also be filmed. Apart from the rather pedestrian direction (by Ron Oliver) and a couple of too obvious twists in the plot, "Third Man" is entertaining throughout.
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22 of 22 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 14, 2006
Format: DVD
Having just read an interview with Morgan Fairchild in the local gay press about her role in the newest Donald Strachey thriller Shock to the System, it's a real treat to watch the first Strachey film now just released on video and starring the talented and out gay actor Chad Allen.

Based on one of the early novels by Richard Stevenson, Third Man Out is a gorgeously campy homage the forties noirish thrillers - except that there's one twist - the handsome, hunky detective is decidedly gay and lives a respectable suburban life with his boyfriend and love of his life Timmy Callahan (Sebastian Spence), they're even in the middle of renovating their home.

Things get nasty when Strachey is called upon to protect John Rutka (Jack Wetherall), a local gay activist, who runs a webzine dedicated to outing important people, particularly hypocritical politicians. Someone is trying to murder Rutka and although Strachey is initially hesitant to help the man out, he is eventually convinced Rutka is telling the truth when he turns up dead.

Director Ron Oliver keeps the action and suspense flowing, cleverly shuffling around characters, clues, red herrings and various plot machinations. In one instance, suspicion falls on Rutka's younger boyfriend Eddie (Woody Jefferies) as he was seen walking past just as a firebomb was thrown at Rutka's house. Strachey also mistrusts Rutka's sister (Sean Young), who is out to inherit most of her brother's property.

But in typical noir style, the narrative builds as clues and missteps are piled on top of each other and Strachey eventually discovers a furtive pornographic blackmail plot.
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39 of 43 people found the following review helpful By M. Tietjen on August 23, 2006
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Having read the original novel "Third Man Out," I have to agree that the screenplay for the movie version was reasonably well adapted. Since I wasn't a huge fan of the book, "reasonably well adapted" to me means that 90% of the book was changed. The movie is loaded with gritty sex and violence that the novel was just missing. Occupations were changed (in the case of one character, from a meteorologist to a singing, puppet-wielding, male Shari Lewis wannabe), motives were changed, personalities were beefed up or changed, scenes were added, a distasteful, unnecessary, and preachy subplot was completely deleted, and the story was transplanted from an obviously early 1990's setting to a vaguely 30's-era seeming present day. None of these are complaints, mind you; everything has been improved. Dramatically.

Unfortunately, whoever adapted the screenplay neglected to change the atrociously bad ending. It negates scenes which took place earlier in the movie, tries to make a point and fails, and is altogether best left unviewed--stop your DVD player about fifteen minutes before the end if you want a satisfactory viewing experience. Without spoiling anything, the twist itself was fine--clever, actually--but various characters' reactions to it were so untrue to life as to be almost offensive. When a character in a movie makes a grand speech at the end that causes other characters to hang their heads in shame, you at least expect the speech to make an ounce of sense and to have any persuasive power whatsoever. Instead, my reaction (to both the book and the movie) was a simple, "Uh huh. Right." Actually, the movie's version of the ending was even worse than the book's, for various reasons.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Darien Wells on May 27, 2007
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
"Third Man Out" proves to be a pretty good movie packed with "film noir" moments and a lot of mystery, suspense and drama. The best part of this film is without doubt, it's star actor Chad Allen, who gives a wonderful performance as "Donald Strachey". Strachey is a gay private detective hired to find who has been threatening a notorious member of the gay community noted for outing prominent people living a double life. When he refuses the case and the notorious John Rutka is reported to have been murdered, Strachey is compelled to solve the crime in spite of his personal disdain for the deceased. To do so, Strachey must protect hundreds of extensive files Rutka kept on high profile individuals he felt were a threat to the gay community. All hell breaks loose when he and his lover become the target of those who had a motive to kill Rutka and are seeking to destroy any evidence which might place them at the top of the list of suspects.

I was intrigued throughout the film to stick with it and find out "who dunnit". Never really a dull moment in this first gay mystery movie. The acting was very well done by almost every one of the nearly all-gay cast. A little overacting on the part of Sebastian Spence, who plays the part of Strachey's boyfriend. Not a bad performance, but probably not best suited for the particular role of the more feminine character. This was a role for which I felt the writing could have been more realistic. Allen's character was perfect, macho and more "straight natured" which fit him to a tee. His acting was flawless. I felt the scripting for the character of Rutka to be written a bit sloppy, and the combination of John Wetherall (Rutka) and Woody Jeffreys as his gay lover Eddie, to be a bit strange, but somehow it worked in spite of that.
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