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Third Ways: How Bulgarian Greens, Swedish Housewives, and Beer-Swilling Englishmen Created Family-Centered Economies - And Why They Disappeared (Culture of Enterprise) Hardcover – October 15, 2007


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Third Ways: How Bulgarian Greens, Swedish Housewives, and Beer-Swilling Englishmen Created Family-Centered Economies - And Why They Disappeared (Culture of Enterprise) + The Natural Family Where It Belongs: New Agrarian Essays
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Product Details

  • Series: Culture of Enterprise
  • Hardcover: 225 pages
  • Publisher: Intercollegiate Studies Institute (October 15, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1933859407
  • ISBN-13: 978-1933859408
  • Product Dimensions: 8.8 x 6 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #700,052 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Allan C. Carlson is president of the Howard Center for Family, Religion & Society and international secretary of the World Congress of Families. In 1988, President Ronald Reagan appointed him to the National Commission on Children, on which he served until 1993. Over the last ten years he has advised various congressional leaders and presidential candidates on how to craft family-friendly policies and legislation.

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22 of 24 people found the following review helpful By New Age of Barbarism on September 6, 2008
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
_Third Ways: How Bulgarian Greens, Swedish Housewives, and Beer-Swilling Englishmen Created Family-Centered Economies - And Why They Disappeared_, published in 2007 in the Culture of Enterprise Series by ISI Books, by leading family scholar Allan C. Carlson is a fascinating examination of some of the early attempts to promote a sort of "third way" economic system that differed and was opposed to both liberal capitalism and communism and that was centered on the family. The third way was frequently aligned with agrarian interests, advocated widespread ownership of private property, and in particular placed a strong emphasis on the family, frequently calling for the creation of a "family wage". The third way also differed from fascism and Nazism in its commitment to democratic institutions and pluralism. The third way emphasized "natural" communities of family, village, neighborhood, and parish and was frequently linked to religious interests. In particular, following the papal encyclical of Leo XIII, _Rerum Novarum_, both G. K. Chesterton and Hilaire Belloc developed an economic system they referred to as Distributism to oppose what they perceived as the excesses of both capitalism and socialism and the dread mergence of the two in the "Servile State" as envisioned by Belloc. This book offers a fascinating examination of some of these economic developments with their emphasis on private property, small-scale ownership, agrarianism, and in particular the role of the family and the household economy.

The book begins with a "Preface" in which the author explains the developments of the twentieth century in which Communism emerged as a significant force to compete with economic liberal capitalism.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By D. J. Taylor on October 11, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is one of the most exciting books I have read in a long time. British and American readers are seriously under-educated about the religious history and politics of Continental Europe, and here the clash between the democratic policies of physically and family-grounded thinkers and the monarchic ambitions of conservative ideologues of whatever temperament (liberal, socialist or tyranical) is set out with the recurring tension of an adventure story. Yet it is not just an adventure story. The deluge of ideas and personalities one is not familiar with but perhaps vaguely aware of makes it also extremely thought-provoking - and very importantly so in the present period of economic crisis and looming ecological catastrophe.

The writer is an American, and on certain important issues I think he is missing the mark (though putting forward points of view well worthy of consideration). Most important of these (understandable given America's revolt against Britain) is his accepting the opinion of a Dutch Protestant that the French Revolution of 1789 marked "the birth [and catastrophe] of modern life". He has not looked back far enough, i.e. for the economic causes of that revolution: to the successful banking fraud which financed Britain's "Glorious Revolution" of 1688 and subsequent era of "stately home" building - inspired by its nouveau riche enjoying the European "Grand Tour". This was the system John Law in 1716 took to a France struggling with the costs of its war with Spain, and which (eventually taken over by state) had continued to impoverish French peasants as enclosure impoverished British laborers. Napoleonic wars impoverished both.
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By Joseph Graves on January 17, 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Third Ways has some fascinating ideas for keeping the wicked human heart from wielding too much power by giving family the opportunity to raise their own food and children by owning a small farm. It illustrated a "third way," not government control of production but also not the opportunity to accumulate great wealth. Interesting read.
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2 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Ashtar Command on April 10, 2011
Format: Hardcover
"Third Ways" by Allan C. Carlson is something of a disappointment. There is very little analysis and background, and the whole book feels like a compilation of quotations from other sources. It doesn't feel like a scholarly work. Rather, the author comes across as a librarian or archivist. Perhaps he *is* a librarian? The dustjucket doesn't list any particular scholarly merits.

The chapter on peasant populism in East Europe is particularly weak. The various peasant parties did *not* have a similar political orientation, and Carlson's attempts to claim Bulgarian peasant leader Stamboliski (essentially a socialist) as one of the Distributist crowd, is particularly weak.

For a better introduction to peasant parties in interwar Eastern Europe, see "Peasants in power" by John D. Bell and "Comintern and Peasant in Eastern Europe 1919-1930" by George D. Jackson.

But yes, the fact that Carlson is a Chesterton look-alike is quite funny.

Beer, anyone?
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