Qty:1
  • List Price: $15.00
  • Save: $1.76 (12%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 5 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Thirst for Love has been added to your Cart
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Light wear. In Amazon's warehouse and eligible for free shipping promotions.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Thirst for Love Paperback – February 22, 1999


See all 21 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$10.00
Paperback
"Please retry"
$13.24
$7.84 $3.59
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
$7.50
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

The Amazon Book Review
The Amazon Book Review
Check out The Amazon Book Review, our editors' fresh new blog featuring interviews with authors, book reviews, quirky essays on book trends, and regular columns by our editors. Explore now
$13.24 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Only 5 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Thirst for Love + After the Banquet + Death in Midsummer: And Other Stories (New Directions Paperbook)
Price for all three: $36.95

Buy the selected items together


Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

Published in the United States during the 1960s but written years earlier, this Mishima trio, while vastly different in plot, all sport the common theme of idealism destroyed by reality. Nearly three decades after his death, Mishima continues to be a compelling novelist. (LJ 1/15/63, LJ 3/15/68, LJ 9/1/69)
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Review

"Japan's foremost man of letters" Spectator "Thirst for Love contains all of the elements that make Mishima a compelling, disturbing writer" Columbus Dispatch --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

"Imperial Woman" by Peral S. Buck
In "Imperial Woman", Pearl S. Buck brings to life the amazing story of Tzu Hsi, who rose from concubine status to become the working head of the Qing Dynasty. See more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Vintage; 1st Vintage International ed edition (February 22, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0375705074
  • ISBN-13: 978-0375705076
  • Product Dimensions: 5.2 x 0.5 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 0.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #880,779 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

3.5 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 15, 1999
Format: Paperback
The intensity of the jealousies and frustrations simmering under the surface of this superficially simple story explodes in the last few pages in a way which is surprising and shocking enough to linger in the memory.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 23, 1998
Format: Paperback
One of Mishima's more restrained works, "Thirst for Love" has a quiet elegance. As we follow the narrator down her lonely and doomed path, it is clear that we are in the hands of a skilled storyteller.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 14 people found the following review helpful By RLS on October 20, 2004
Format: Paperback
Mishima's _Thirst for Love_ is most readily understood in the context of his other writings and thematic concerns. Throughout his literary career, Mishima was deeply troubled by changes in Japanese culture during modernity (starting around the 19th century) and beyond, particularly after the Asia-Pacific War (1931-1945). He viewed the loss of tradition as devastating to any culture, leaving them without an initial way to healthily exist and understand the processes of life and death. Japan, with its slow accretion of Western culture, was merely one macrocosmic example of this historical trend.

_Thirst for Love_ is in part a fictional presentation of this cultural decline: examples of decay are present throughout the novel, such as Miyo's rejection of traditional dress and customs, Etsuko's obsession with the lower-class farmhand, Kensuke's pathetic pseudo-intellectualism, Saburo's physical transgressions against Etsuko, and numerous others. It is imperative, then, that each of these chracters be frustrated with their actions in life and ultimately reach a sort of destruction, for they are all encapsulations of Mishima's "fallen man," the one without guidance from tradition and sane, known ways of living.

A psychological reading of the book would prove fascinating, particularly of Etsuko, Saburo, Takichi, and Kensuke.

Mishima's characterization in this work is admittedly rather weak, relative to his other novel-length works. Perhaps this is because adding satisfactory details and back history to each of the many characters introduced throughout the book would have proven difficult, if not impossible.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By 777 on October 10, 1999
Format: Paperback
Mishima is a fascinating and intoxicating author to me, but I felt a little disappointed with Thirst for Love after having read the Sailor Who Fell From Grace With the Sea. It seems less focused somehow; I found certain segments a bit dull and the end somewhat dissatisfying (not just because it wasn't "happy.") But, those are just the cons -- I still think this is quite a book. Etsuko's psychology is fascinating, and there are some great moments. Quality, unconventional stuff.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Kiwifunlad on January 24, 2011
Format: Paperback
Published in 1950 Thirst for Love was one of Mishima's early novels and written shortly after his Confessions of a Mask which had already gained him celebrated public acclaim. The novel is set on a ten acre property on the outskirts of Osaka owned by Yakichi, a retired businessman and widower in his sixties but wishing to return to traditional life living off the land. With Yakichi is his indolent intellectual son Kensuke and his wife Cheiko, daughter-in-law Asako (whose husband is in Siberia) 8 year old daughter Nobuko and 5 year old son Natsuo, and the recently widowed third daughter-in-law Etsuko. The household is completed by a young peasant maid Miyo and 18 year old gardener, Saburo. Mishima focuses on the relationships between the above especially Etsuko whose husband had been a very unfaithful philanderer and now Etsuko has become the mistress of her father-in-law, Yakichi. Her passionate obsession is for the young tanned and good looking gardener, Saburo. Saburo is a naïve innocent young man who is having a physical relationship with Miyo and unaware of Etsuko's obsession and jealousy. Mishima's contrasts the relationships in the household: the intellectual cynical detached relationship of Kensuke and Chieko and the physical but loveless relationship between Miyo and Saburo. The mix of love, sex, death, obsession, jealousy is central to a number of Mishima's works and Thirst for Love lacks appeal largely for the very detached manner the characters interact. Mishima's writing I enjoy and I have loved several of his other novels Confessions of a Mask, Spring Snow and Forbidden Colours but Thirst for Love is not as good.Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?