This Day All Gods Die (The Gap Cycle) and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy Used
$4.00
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: This book has already been loved by someone else. It MIGHT have some wear and tear on the edges, have some markings in it, or be an ex-library book. Over-all it is still a good book at a great price! (if it is supposed to contain a CD or access code, that may be missing)
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

This Day All Gods Die: The Gap Into Ruin (Gap Series/Stephen R. Donaldson) Hardcover – April 1, 1996


See all 9 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$5.65 $0.01

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New Adult Fiction by Rainbow Rowell
Acclaimed author Rainbow Rowell's latest book, Landline, offers a poignant, humorous look at relationships and marriage. Learn more

Product Details

  • Series: Gap Series/Stephen R. Donaldson
  • Hardcover: 564 pages
  • Publisher: Spectra (April 1, 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0553071807
  • ISBN-13: 978-0553071801
  • Product Dimensions: 9.4 x 6.6 x 1.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (64 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,116,418 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Tough-as-nails Morn Hyland, pirate-turned-cyborg Angus Thermopyle, and the whole crew from the United Mining Company Police are back in the final book of the Gap series, This Day All Gods Die. The Gap plot has raced through the galaxy at breakneck speeds, and the conclusion is no exception.

Morn, her alien-grown son Davies, geneticist/engineer Vector Sheed, competent Mikka, and her cabin-boy brother Ciro wait aboard Trumpet. Angus lies unconscious, possibly in permanent stasis. Ciro plots to destroy the ship, driven insane by the knowledge that alien mutagens have been shot into him by Nick Succorso's sworn enemy, Sorus Chatelaine. Following nearby, Min Donner, faithful head of the UMCP Executive Division, watches the action and grits her teeth aboard Captain Dolph's battle-fatigued Punisher. Will Morn trust her? Will her voice commands over Angus's programming prevail? Who has survived the strange journey and battles since leaving the Lab? Back at United Mining headquarters, the Dragon and UMCP Chief Warden Dios's strange, twisted duel of manipulation, assassination, and corruption comes to a head when an Amnion warship sets course for Earth... and that's just the first few pages.

Get set for more of the action, betrayal, characterizataion, intrigue, corruption, and adventure you've enjoyed in the previous Gap books. If it has been a few years since you read the last installment, you may have trouble remembering some names and particularly insidious points of plot and government intrigue; you may even be tempted to reread the preceding books. Also troubling is Angus's continual rumination of a couple phrases, including "We've committed a crime against your soul" and "It's got to stop." However, you may be reading so fast you won't notice.

From Publishers Weekly

Drawing on a rich vein of science fiction, Donaldson brings to a resounding, though not triumphant, conclusion his Gap series, begun with The Gap into Conflict (1992) and continued through The Gap into Madness (1994). The struggle between Warden Dios, director of the United Mining Companies Police, and Horst Fasner, CEO of United Mining Companies itself, reaches a climax here. So does the tension between the human race and the alien Amnion, exacerbated by human development of a drug that prevents people from being mutated into the aliens. Meanwhile, much-victimized Morn Hyland and her motley crew are heading for Earth and arrive at the same time as an Amnion warship. The first third of the novel wins no marks for pacing, but later portions pick up speed, with the final battles near Earth satisfying all requirements for logic, excitement and catharsis. Donaldson's usual weaknesses are in evidence: substitution of scenery-chewing and angst for characterization, and an abundance of prolix passages. Too, this volume may confound those new to the series. But it's a crowd-pleasing story told on a grand scale, SF adventure with a genuinely galactic feel.
Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

Popular Discussion Topics

beta: what do you think?
  • "Characters" 10
  • "Writing" 10
  • "Action" 3
  • "Emotional" 2
  • All Topics

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 1, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I feel this series is truly one of the best I have ever read, and the most overlooked by serious science fiction readers. Those who were looking for the Thomas Covenant series would not find it here. I admit, I thought The Real Story was not as strong of a start as it could have been, but in my opinion each book was better than the last, and this climax is truly one of the most incredible books I have read. The characters have depth and expression provided by the contrasts between their flaws and their strengths -- and the complexity of the tale weaving through the books pulls together well. The beauty of the tale is summed up by Warden Dios -- he did not choose Morn because of who she was, but merely because she was conveniently at hand -- but she and the rest of everyone he put his trust in transcended him.
I have read this series many, many times over and am always awed when I come to this last book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 17, 1997
Format: Mass Market Paperback
You will see both good and bad reviews of this book (and series) here. Personally I believe this is one of the the hardest books to put down I've ever read. Yes the ending is somewhat predictable; after so much suffering the good guys have to win. But the path to the violent climax of this book is very unique. The characters are complex and finely crafted--(do you hate or admire Warden Dios?; is Angus a pathological criminal or a victim?; is Morn a strong or weak?). There is no relaxing in this book. Donaldson keeps things finely balanced--you know it's coming, but don't know when chaos will errupt again.

For those of you that have read the Thomas Covenant books: this is just as serious and just as depressing. The characters are less shallow for the most part. This series not a fantasy, but a hard core SF story.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Omar Siddique TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on November 13, 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This volume caps Donaldson's amazing Gap series. Those familiar with my reviews know that I don't lightly describe something as amazing. This is easily the most captivating SF series I have read in years, and unlike many series, it does not peter out or become predictable in later volumes.
As you would expect of Donaldson's work, the real story is about the characters and their flaws and struggles -- he takes us deep into the well developed personalities of each major character, and how they persevere, or fail, despite their weaknesses.
The series is pretty cleanly wrapped up in this volume, with few unanswered questions left at the end. If you've come this far in the series, of course you want to read this one too!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By J. D. Edwards on January 18, 2001
Format: Mass Market Paperback
When I started reading the series, I was wary. Various people warned me of the brutality I would encounter. Thus, I read out of curiosity. After finishing book one, I decided that I had encountered neither the brutality nor the intricate characters or plot I had expected.
However, I plowed forward. As the books went on, the characters gained depth, the plot twisted and grew more precarious, and I started taking sides.
By the time I reached this final book of the saga, I was fully hooked, and rightly so. Donaldson ties it all together in the final volume. The intrigue unwinds with a domino effect and plays itself out quite nicely. Further, although many plots and subplots reach fruition, he does not insult the reader by leaving us with a happy world with carefree characters. This is as it should be - a series about a period in time, not a novel claiming to encompass all relavant times.
I would recommend that readers not stop with the first book of the series, or even the second. Keep reading and you will understand the politics at work, which makes this final book all the more satisfying.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 18, 1997
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Stephen Donaldson infuses his fiction with the ideas and import of great art and philosophy of the past. The Thomas Covenant Chronicles is largely a Biblical allegory. The Mordant's Need series has its roots in King Lear.

The Gap series, as Donaldson points out in the afterword to the first of five volumes, is a functional allegory to Wagner's Der Ring des Nibelungen (the Ring of the Nibelungen), a cycle of four operas based in the Norse and Teutonic mythologies that also gave considerable inspiration to Tolkien.

Though the novels function more than adequately without a working knowledge of the Ring, the power and intricacy of Donaldson's plotting and structure is all the more powerful when the allegory is understood.

Some of the reviews below confuse me in the points they find to be unpleasant -- predictability, etc. There seems to be a general consternation in the fact that "the good guys win." Yet, as far as I can remember, they do so in Tolkien, earlier Donaldson, Brooks, Eddings, and every other fantasy series, science fiction movie and "genre" entertainment that I've ever run across.

What needs to be remembered here is Donaldson's ability to structure and create is absolutely virtuosic. The first novel was originally conceived as a stand-alone short story and it remains the weakest of the five. It is unbearably brutal, harsh, and a character study, as his afterwords points out, in changing the roles of victim, persecutor and rescuer among the three characters. In its closed goal, it's still hard to read, but nonetheless succeeds in changing Morn Hyland from victim to rescuer, Angus Thermopylae from persecutor to victim, and Nick Succorso from rescuer to persecutor within a particualr context.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?