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This Is the Way We Eat Our Lunch: A Book About Children Around the World Library Binding – September 1, 1995


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 5 and up
  • Library Binding: 32 pages
  • Publisher: Scholastic Trade; 1St Edition edition (September 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0590468871
  • ISBN-13: 978-0590468879
  • Product Dimensions: 9.9 x 8 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #117,287 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Kindergarten-Grade 2?As they did in This Is the Way We Go to School (Scholastic, 1990), Baer and Bjorkman have again teamed up to broaden the horizons of youngsters, this time by introducing them to different cuisines from around the world. They follow the format of the earlier title, presenting two rhyming lines per location, beginning with various U.S. sites and then extending outward to Canada, South America, and so on. Additional features include a world map highlighting locations mentioned, three recipes, and a listing of dishes and types of cookery at the book's end. While the watercolor and pen cartoons are fine for conveying local flavor, they sometimes fall short of adequate depictions of some dishes, especially the gumbo, couscous, and Chinese dumplings. Sometimes the food is impossible to detect?the curry, pita bread, and Ghanan beans and rice are completely hidden within their pictures. Thus This Is the Way We Eat Our Lunch will be best presented if followed by further research or taste testing.?Claudia Cooper, Ft. Stockton Independent School District, TX
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Booklist

Ages 2^-8. Baer's sprightly rhyme canters on a lunchtime tour around the world through nine states, two Canadian provinces, and 11 countries. An appended world map charts the journey from clam chowder in Massachusetts and hot dogs at Coney Island through soufflein Quebec, plantains in Puerto Rico, couscous in North Africa, curry in India, and tempura in Japan. Food facts and recipes for fruit salad, hummus, and wild rice soup round out the book. Complemented by Bjx9a rkman's delicate, airy pen drawings washed in a wide palette of watercolor tones, the lively rhyme will appeal to a wide range of children, from toddlers who will relish the pictures to young students just beginning to savor the wider world. Linda Ward-Callaghan

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Erika Mitchell TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on December 9, 2003
Format: Library Binding
This book is a whirlwind tour of eating habits of children around the world. In the first part of the book, we see and learn about regional menu items that North American children might eat for lunch, such as clam chowder or gumbo. In the remainder of the book, we visit other continents, and see lunches in countries such as Ghana, Israel, Italy, and China. There is a map at the end of the book, and recipes for fruit salad, hummus, and soup. There is a also a glossary of some of the new words used in the book. The text rhymes, and there are about 270 words.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Catherine S. Vodrey on July 19, 2002
Format: Library Binding
Edith Baer's rhyming text explores lunch the world over, going far beyond the typical American lunch of peanut butter and jelly sandwiches. She uses simple couplets to cover everything from veggie burgers to tacos to fish chowder (in the United States) and then goes well beyond American borders to look at Colombia, Italy, Puerto Rico, Japan, England, Australia, China, India, and more.
Not only do the lunches sound delicious (and teach children reading the book of the astonishing diversity of culinary habits the world over), but Steve Bjorkman's cheerful, colorful illustrations go a long way towards making the unusual seem utterly appetizing. This talented artist's work has appeared in national publications (he used to illustrate regularly for BETTER HOMES & GARDENS magazine, and I miss seeing his work there!). The simple lines and happy look of his pictures perfectly suit Edith Baer's text.
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Format: Library Binding
One of the most positive forces to arise in the American educational system in the last few decades has been the increase in multicultural studies. As the world becomes much more intertwined and interdependent, it has become critical that people have a greater understanding of those in other places and cultures. Few, if any markets are completely local anymore, using the Internet, it is now possible to sell your goods to someone anywhere in the world.
That education needs to start early and one of the best ways to begin is to learn what other people eat. Children will have an instinctive understanding of this and having the referenced foods made available for in-class snacks can reinforce the terms from the book. Therefore, this book is an excellent resource for multicultural studies at the elementary school level and children will enjoy the associated research projects.
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By Tammy on December 10, 2008
Format: Library Binding Verified Purchase
I used this book (in conjunction with 3 others) to make a lesson plan about the history of immigration in the United States and diversity. Children really enjoy learning about what other kids do (and eat). I think this is a wonderful book to teach children about different cultures and customs.
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