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This World We Live In (The Last Survivors, Book 3) [Hardcover] Unknown Binding – 2010

4 out of 5 stars 268 customer reviews
Book 3 of 4 in the Life As We Knew It Series

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Product Details

  • Unknown Binding
  • ASIN: B004CSK7TA
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (268 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #13,741,421 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

SUSAN BETH PFEFFER is the author of many books for teens, including Life As We Knew It and the bestselling novel The Year Without Michael. She lives in Middletown, New York.

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
THIS WORLD WE LIVE IN is not the follow-up to LIFE AS WE KNEW IT that I was hoping for.

I think the root of the problem is that the diary format just doesn't work for this installment. In book one, it was interesting enough to follow Miranda's personal journey via her written thoughts. She goes from a girl who has the whole world open to her to a girl trapped in a dark, cold room with only her starving family (and, yes, the family cat). However, this time around, Miranda's character arc is so scant that it can't sustain 300 pages of her whining.

The diary format also makes the creation of sympathetic, three-dimensional supporting characters difficult. I do recall caring about the fate of Miranda's family in the first book, but here all we see through Miranda's eyes is mom being an agoraphobic shrew, older brother Matt being a selfish jerk, and everyone else just existing.

The romance between Miranda and Alex (the "hero" of book 2) is dead in the water. These two have so little chemistry together, I cringed when they touched. And c'mon Miranda - I know you don't have a lot of options for romance, but Alex is NOT boyfriend material. He wants to be monk. He's super controlling and stubborn. And he's obsessed with his sister. (Good at finding food though. I'll give him that.)

And what's up with everyone just moping around the entire novel until a tragic event (in the last 20 pages) forces them into action? Why couldn't we have gotten more exploration of the "safe town" idea for instance?

Unless you are just really in love with the characters and world of LIFE AS WE KNEW IT, I'd probably recommended putting this one near the bottom of your reading pile.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I just finished Life as we Knew It, and was blown away. When I saw there was a follow up, I had to see what happened. I kind of wish I hadn't.

This World We Live In by Susan Beth Pfeffer takes place a month after Life as we Knew it. After getting halfway through this book, I realized there was a second book I hadn't read, but didn't feel I needed that book to read this one. Miranda continues to write about how life is after the meteor disaster and the struggle to find food and other necessities. Except it seems like all of the characters have regressed in their maturity. Miranda starts whining about how bad life is again and fights with her mom about ridiculous things. Matt, who may have been my favorite character in the last book, now is completely self centered and can only talk about a girl he's found while fishing. New characters enter the book, but they only add to the whine and dine that is this book.

I was completely underwhelmed by this new entry in this series and hope that this is the last one. Life as we knew it is a wonderful book and can act as a stand alone. I encourage people to see it that way.
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Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
First Line: I'm shivering, and I can't tell if it's because something strange is going on or because of the dream I had or just because I'm in the kitchen, away from the warmth of the woodstove.

A year ago, an asteroid crashed into the moon, forcing it closer to Earth with catastrophic results. Teenager Miranda Evans is almost accustomed to friends and neighbors being dead, to food shortages, to the relentless gray skies and freezing temperatures.

The struggle to survive gets worse when Miranda's father, stepmother, their baby, and three strangers show up on the doorstep. One of the strangers is Alex Morales, the young boy in the dead & the gone, the second book in the trilogy by Pfeffer. Alex is going to cause some very profound changes, not only in Miranda's life, but in the lives of all the others struggling to survive in this nearly deserted town in Pennsylvania.

I loved the first book in the trilogy, Life As We Knew It. The scenario involving the asteroid crashing into the moon and forcing it closer to the earth captured my imagination. Miranda's voice rang true to me: typical whiny, self-absorbed teenager at the beginning, she matured before my eyes and really made me care about her and her family.

the dead & the gone I didn't care for as much, mostly because of Alex's insistence on being The Man of the Family who always knows best and who must be obeyed at all times. This reaction is undoubtedly personal, since I've never dealt well with anyone who's had that attitude.

In many ways, I wish Life As We Knew It had been a standalone, because I had no real emotional investment in this third book.
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Format: Paperback
I understand this is a young adult series but the worst thing a writer can do is write "down" to her audience regardless of age and I think for some reason Ms. Pfeffer did exactly that with this third installment.
I too, was rooting for the family in the first book, the second book was much darker but gave a completely different perspective of what life was like for people living in a big city. Book three was just very disappointing. I was so looking forward to getting back to Howell and seeing what the family dynamic was doing however, it wasn't doing much and where I found the characters in the first book interesting enough for me to want to know more the third book sadly did not deliver. Boring: nothing happens except for the ex-husband coming back with wife, baby and 3 stragglers. I was looking forward to seeing how they would all interact but was very disheartened to see them all pair off. Miranda and Alex was too predictable. The rest of the characters from book one got real nasty and mean or maudlin, like completely different characters from the first book especially the Mom and Matt character. THEN the religious overtones kicked in...why? All of a sudden, everyone is praying in different corners of the house, having bible studies and even Miranda (though not religious) sings a hymn...how did she know a hymn if she isn't religious? (That would be like me humming a Gregorian Chant...trust me I wouldn't have a clue.) So many religious overtones I almost thought it was one of those teen-christian books. And WHY, WHY was Alex so bound and determined to get his little sister to a convent? He says he wanted her safe...well, if I had to leave my little sister somewhere "safe" it wouldn't be in a convent with a bunch of old nuns...
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