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Thomas Jefferson: Genius of Liberty Hardcover – April 3, 2000


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 176 pages
  • Publisher: Studio; 1st edition (April 3, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0670889334
  • ISBN-13: 978-0670889334
  • Product Dimensions: 8.8 x 0.8 x 11.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,615,829 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A. Reed on April 19, 2006
Format: Hardcover
Apparently the reviewer from Swizerland is an an expert on looking at history with 20/20 hindsight. This book discusses the views of liberty and philosophy that Thomas Jefferson admired, and gives a better insight into the kind of person he was. The book details how Jefferson greatly admired John Locke, and worked to build the United States with the philosophy of Locke in mind. If the reviewer from Swizerland has a problem with Jefferson's ideas of philosophy, he must also have a problem with the natural rights of life, liberty and estate that Locke proposed! What many who criticize Jefferson fail to realize is that in our current day and age, minorities have been able to embrace Jefferson's views of liberty and equality. According to black scholar Annette Gordon-Reed, (who spoke about this book at a Library of Congress seminar,) "American minorities have taken Jeffersonian ideals of liberty and equality to heart, expanding their meaning in ways Jefferson himself never believed possible." The book is written in a patriotic tone, as one would expect from the Library of Congress, however it is written in an objective voice, and does describe Jefferson's hardships and shortcomings. It addresses the controversy of Jefferson's relationship with Sally Hemmings and discusses the failure of Monticello to sustain itself as a plantation. The book also covers Jefferson's personal love of art and architecture. While any figure in history has their fair share of controversy, this book is an excellent look at the man and his life, and does not get bogged down in speculation and opinion, as a more subjective biography might do.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 25, 2003
Format: Hardcover
It's hard to argue that Jefferson was a man of great contrasts and contradictions. At the same time, it's hard to argue that his contributions to America--and to the world--are enduring. This volume contains many elements of interest, and helps the reader understand not only Jefferson the man, but also the historic context that made him the man that he was. He was a product of his times, in many ways, but was also able to transcend those times and create a vision that helped America become a land of both flaws and genius. The legacy of the U.S. rests on the shoulders of no individual person, but is a result of the efforts of countless men and women. Among those who are known to history, Jefferson is one essential to be reckoned with. This volume provides insights into the man and his times.
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By Michael Madden on August 31, 2014
Format: Hardcover
Great read
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4 of 31 people found the following review helpful By reviewer on January 12, 2003
Format: Hardcover
If the meaning of liberty is the act of enslaving innocent men, women and children, (throughout their natural lives), then I completely agree with the "scholars" that compiled this book. If not, I disagree.
In the same vein, I would have no comments if any horizontal 'scholar' emerges tomorrow with a book titled, "Osama Bin-Laden: The Genius of Justice".
Well, this book, ("Thomas Jefferson: Genius of Liberty"), made mockery of its subject. It swarms with undeserved sycophantic accolades. Professor Ellis edited it shortly before he came of age. Its contents are no accident. Call it the irony of 'a civilized world'.
My dear, you will like this book if you are fanatical about anything U.S.A. However, if you are a conscientious patriot, who strives to be morally reasonable (no matter what), do not bother to read it. It does not worth your time. It contains more praise-songs than honest analyses. It profanes the very ideals that you would expect it to protect.
Thomas Jefferson and true liberty are at best, two parallel lines. They have nothing in common, and will never meet.
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