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Thomas Paine: Common Sense and Revolutionary Pamphleteering (The Library of American Lives and Times Series)

3 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Grade Level: 4 - 6
  • Series: The Library of American Lives and Times Series
  • Audio CD
  • Publisher: Brilliance Audio; Unabridged edition (October 20, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1423394402
  • ISBN-13: 978-1423394402
  • Product Dimensions: 5 x 1.4 x 7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #6,840,464 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Library Binding
This slim volume is a fair introduction (or refresher) to the subject for middle-schoolers on up.

The chapter titles are as follows:

Introduction
1. Courage Under Fire
2. English Born
3. Understanding the Nature of Things
4. The Adventure Begins
5. A Journeyman's Search
6. A Crisis in the Colonies
7. The Power of Revolutionary Prose
8. The Birth of American Freedom
9. Setting the World on Fire
10. A Citizen of the New World
11. Paine's Legacy

After the brief introduction and first chapter telling who Paine was and why he is important, McCartin devotes a chapter to placing Paine firmly in the societal & political context of 18th-century England. From there, he proceeds with Paine's life in a more-or-less chronological manner. We read a bit about Paine's boyhood (mostly via life in general in the town of Thetford, England), early education, and apprenticeship as a staymaker. We learn of Paine's move to London, a brief flirtation with privateering, his intense interest in science, and a growing interest in socio-political issues, leading to his becoming a community leader and labor activist.

As chapter 6 begins, it is 1774 and Paine is going through both personal and professional hardship, so he sails off to America. The narrative slows down quite a bit from here on, as McCartin spends the bulk of the remaining chapters on Paine's significant contributions to both the American Revolution and the French Revolution. Many excerpts are quoted or reproduced from Common Sense, An American Crisis, Rights of Man, Age of Reason, etc.
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
i have this in hard copy, Im in the process of losing my eye sight, this audio brings my love back to me.
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
The discs took almost two minutes to start playing and then each disc abruptly stopped several minutes after starting. Each time I started the car and the discs were still in the player, the same problems occurred.
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