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Those the Brokes


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Audio CD, July 17, 2007
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Amazon's The Magic Numbers Store

Music

Image of album by The Magic Numbers

Photos

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Biography

The Magic Numbers release ALIAS the new album on 18th August.

After a successful jaunt to SXSW and the premiering of their new song ‘Roy Orbison’ by Steve Lamacq on 6music last week, The Magic Numbers announce a 12-date autumn tour of the UK.

Armed with a new album that will be released on Caroline/Universal this summer, The Magic Numbers kick off their tour in Glasgow ... Read more in Amazon's The Magic Numbers Store

Visit Amazon's The Magic Numbers Store
for 14 albums, 7 photos, discussions, and more.

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Product Details

  • Audio CD (July 17, 2007)
  • Original Release Date: 2007
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Astralwerks
  • ASIN: B000R7I2JW
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #286,722 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. This Is a Song
2. You Never Had It
3. Take a Chance
4. Boy
5. Undecided
6. Slow Down (The Way It Goes)
7. Keep It In The Pocket
8. Take Me or Leave Me
9. Let Somebody In
10. Runnin' Out
11. Goodnight
12. All I See (hidden track)

Editorial Reviews

Product Description

The second album from the Magic Numbers, Those the Brokes find this hirsute UK foursome--comprised of two brother/sister pairs, Michele and Romeo Stodart with Angela and Sean Gannon--expanding on the florid, harmonic pop vision showcased on their Mercury Music Prize-nominated 2005 debut. Importantly, Those the Brokes doesn't just mimic that album's most obvious tricks--or, indeed, the tricks of their forefathers (the Beach Boys, the Mamas and the Papas). Indeed, these 13 tracks often find the Magic Numbers eschewing straightforward breezy sing-alongs for more complex outings that boast a more nuanced understanding of shade and space, or hide firm, beating hearts underneath their diaphanous pop exteriors. Oh, okay, the opening "This Is a Song" prances along at a fleet-footed tempo, all lilting, interlocking voices and tumbling guitars. But "Take a Chance" comes on like a candy-flavoured Sonic Youth, breathy harmonies hiding choppy guitar crunch, while "Undecided" --a mid-album delight that sees Angela take the microphone for a bruised, bluesy paean to breaking up and making up--boasts the sort of vintage soul muscle that few, to date, have given the Magic Numbers credit for. Time to reconsider. --Louis Pattison

Amazon.com

The second album from the Magic Numbers, Those the Brokes, finds this hirsute UK foursome-–comprised of two brother/sister pairs, Michele and Romeo Stodart with Angela and Sean Gannon--expanding on the florid, harmonic pop vision showcased on their Mercury Music Prize-nominated 2005 debut. Importantly, it doesn't just mimic that album's most obvious tricks--or, indeed, the tricks of their forefathers (The Beach Boys, the Mamas and the Papas). Indeed, these 13 tracks often find the Magic Numbers eschewing straightforward breezy sing-alongs for more complex outings that boast a more nuanced understanding of shade and space, or hide firm, beating hearts underneath their diaphanous pop exteriors. Oh, OK, the opening "This Is a Song" prances along at a fleet-footed tempo, all lilting, interlocking voices and tumbling guitars. But "Take a Chance" comes on like a candy-flavoured Sonic Youth, breathy harmonies hiding choppy guitar crunch, while "Undecided"--a mid-album delight that sees Angela take the microphone for a bruised, bluesy paean to breaking up and making up-–boasts the sort of vintage soul muscle that few, to date, have given the Magic Numbers credit for. Time to reconsider. --Louis Pattison

Customer Reviews

3.6 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By E. A Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on July 16, 2007
Format: Audio CD
Longing and broken love, played in uptempo indiepop and wistful ballads.

That's what the Magic Numbers played in their self-titled debut, and that's what they play in their sophomore album "Those the Brokes" -- painful, prettily sparkling pop music. It would have benefited from a song or two being trimmed off, but the English quartet sound more polished and assured.

It opens with gentle glockenspiel and a murky guitar melody, before blooming out into a sprightly little pop tune. "I don't wanna tell her/No don't want to tell her/I lie awake in the dark/Lost in the beat of my heart," Romeo Stodart sings mournfully. "And if it hurts me baby you know why/I go it alone/Hurt me baby if you like/It's already gone..."

It's a bit too pop, I have to admit. But they embrace a more sweeping, catchy melody in the layered "You Never Had It," with some squiggle synth and ringing guitar riffs. From there, they try out all sorts of pop music: peppy dancey stuff, mellow bouncy tunes, some fun alt-rock, folk-edged string melodies, and meditative little ballads, ending with the folksy, fond "Goodnight."

If "Those the Brokes" has a flaw, it's that it's about two songs too long. But on a musical level, it's a great combination -- like Camera Obscura, the two brother-sister pairs meld the mournful, wistful, achy lyrics encapsulated in shimmering, smooth pop confections. You're sad, but still the music is a bit uplifting.

Those melodies are spun out of some solid guitars (both solidly acoustic and blurrily cycling), some undulating basslines and drums for the basic beats. But they're also dressed up in some extra instrumentation -- melodica, weeping strings, some really exquisite glockenspiel tinkling, and what sounds like a trumpet in "Undecided.
Read more ›
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Full iPod on November 29, 2006
Format: Audio CD
I've been looking for something different and refreshing and have found the magic number! I just bought both Those The Brokes as well as their 2005 release and find both excellent. Looking at some of the other album reviews, they have been referred to as lost 60's group and compared to the Mama's and Papa's. Although there are similarities; brothers and sisters, two men and two women, I think they are unique and very much worth your time and money. Highly recommended. You can't go wrong. These guys have tremendous natural songwriting abilities.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By H. Lane Sowinski on December 3, 2006
Format: Audio CD
Catchy is the only way to begin to describe The Magic Numbers newest release. Their harmonies are something that you haven't heard in a while, invoking thoughts of male and female pop groups of the 60's, with psychedelic bits and kibbles and a certain indie twinge. It's really beautiful music and I think the past 3 generations could really like the sound if they are given the chance to listen. Strings, xylophones, classical music of some sort is thrown in for a new twist but still Those The Brokes is more pop rock oriented, while their last release was just a bit slower and more melodic. I prefer this new one but both are great albums to start with. You could dance in your underwear to this, bop your head in the car, and even make a perfect Valentine's Day mix. This album is infinitely versatile to different styles, uses, moods, and people in general.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By IRate on February 7, 2009
Format: Audio CD
3 1/2

The album looses a little steam about halfway through, opting for a slower section which the band doesn't dazzle with quite as much as a first side of upbeat numbers, but altogether this is a good example of how a few modifications to a tried and true indie-pop format can breathe urgency back into the compositions.
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Format: Audio CD
Longing and broken love, played in uptempo indiepop and wistful ballads.

That's what the Magic Numbers played in their self-titled debut, and that's what they play in their sophomore album "Those the Brokes" -- painful, prettily sparkling pop music. It would have benefited from a song or two being trimmed off, but the English quartet sound more polished and assured.

It opens with gentle glockenspiel and a murky guitar melody, before blooming out into a sprightly little pop tune. "I don't wanna tell her/No don't want to tell her/I lie awake in the dark/Lost in the beat of my heart," Romeo Stodart sings mournfully. "And if it hurts me baby you know why/I go it alone/Hurt me baby if you like/It's already gone..."

It's a bit too pop, I have to admit. But they embrace a more sweeping, catchy melody in the layered "You Never Had It," with some squiggle synth and ringing guitar riffs. From there, they try out all sorts of pop music: peppy dancey stuff, mellow bouncy tunes, some fun alt-rock, folk-edged string melodies, and meditative little ballads, ending with the folksy, fond "Goodnight."

If "Those the Brokes" has a flaw, it's that it's about two songs too long. But on a musical level, it's a great combination -- like Camera Obscura, the two brother-sister pairs meld the mournful, wistful, achy lyrics encapsulated in shimmering, smooth pop confections. You're sad, but still the music is a bit uplifting.

Those melodies are spun out of some solid guitars (both solidly acoustic and blurrily cycling), some undulating basslines and drums for the basic beats. But they're also dressed up in some extra instrumentation -- melodica, weeping strings, some really exquisite glockenspiel tinkling, and what sounds like a trumpet in "Undecided.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
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