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Thou Shall Prosper: Ten Commandments for Making Money Paperback – February 8, 2005

ISBN-13: 978-0471710233 ISBN-10: 0471710237 Edition: 1st

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 368 pages
  • Publisher: Wiley; 1 edition (February 8, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0471710237
  • ISBN-13: 978-0471710233
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 1 x 9.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (75 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #386,953 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Combining pop psychology, snippets of Jewish lore, homespun homilies and quotations from a daunting variety of sources, Lapin offers a manual on how to make money by succeeding in business. Lapin, a super-conservative Orthodox rabbi and talk show host, insists that everyone is in business "unless you are a Supreme Court judge [sic] or a tenured university professor." (Excluding professors fits with Lapin's devaluation of them, since he believes that higher education doesn't prepare for "real life.") The material is organized into 10 chapters of advice, beginning with the notion that "business is moral, noble and worthy," and ending with the admonition not to retire. Throughout, Lapin urges behavior that will produce more business and, thus, more money. For example, he unabashedly recommends attending synagogue or church services in order to make business contacts. Similarly, he encourages giving charity to an organization that has members who "are in the best position to advance your business objectives." Lapin justifies these dubious actions by interpreting the fifth commandment ("Honor thy father and thy mother") as a mandate to form relationships for business purposes. His struggle to ground his financial advice in Jewish tradition is abandoned as he expounds an anti-environmentalist stance. He digresses still further from both Judaism and wealth-building when he gives tips for public speaking based on what his father taught him (talking without a manuscript or notes and not grasping the rostrum). Lapin's book may appeal to patient readers who share his conservative political and economic views.
Copyright 2002 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

Combining pop psychology, snippet of Jewish lore, homespun homilies and quotations from a daunting variety of sources, Lapin offers a manual on how to make money by succeeding in business. Lapin, a super conservative Orthodox rabbi and talk show host, insists that everyone is in business "unless you are a Supreme Court judge (sic) or a tenured university professor." (Excluding professors fits with Lapin's devaluation of them, since he believes that higher education doesn't prepare for "real Life.") The material is organized into 10 chapters of advice, beginning with the notion that "business is moral, noble and worthy," and ending with the admonition not to retire. Throughout, Lapin urges behavior that will produce more business and, thus, more money. For example, he unabashedly recommends attending synagogue or church services in order to make business contacts. Similarly, he encourages giving charity to an organization that has members who "are in the best position to advance your business objectives." Lapin justifies these dubious actions by interpreting the fifth commandment ("Honor thy father and thy mother") as a mandate to form relationships for business purposes. His struggle to ground his financial advice in Jewish tradition is abandoned as he expounds an anti-evnironmentalist stance. He digresses still further from both Judaism and wealth-building when he gives tips for public speaking based on what his father taught him (talking without a manuscript or notes and not grasping the rostrum). Lapin's book may appear to patient readers who share his conservative political and economic views. (Oct. 11) (Publishers Weekly, September 30, 2002) --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

www.RabbiDanielLapin.com

America's rabbi: A gifted communicator and ardent advocate for faith, family & fortune; Jewish community leader; broadcaster; scholar; speaker, and author.

Rabbi Daniel Lapin, noted rabbinic scholar, best-selling author and host of The Rabbi Daniel Lapin Radio Show on San Francisco's KSFO is one of America's most eloquent speakers. He is famous for his ability to extract life principles from ancient Jewish wisdom and make them accessible to people of all background in entertaining and practical ways. His books and audio CD programs are credited with encouraging vast numbers of Christians and Jews to re-embrace their respective faiths. Newsweek magazine included him in its first list of America's fifty most influential rabbis.
With his wife Susan he hosts the daily TCT television show Ancient Jewish Wisdom.

He is president of the American Alliance of Jews and Christians, the national organization promoting Biblically-based Judeo-Christian values. Through his books, broadcasts and speeches, he has become one of America's most compelling and persuasive voices in defense of what he calls Ethical Capitalism.

Before immigrating to the United States in 1973, Rabbi Lapin studied Torah, physics, economics and mathematics in Johannesburg, London and Jerusalem. This seemingly unlikely combination forms the bedrock of his conviction that no conflict exists between the physical and spiritual, virtue and strength, or faith and wealth.

Lapin was the founding rabbi of Pacific Jewish Center, a now legendary Orthodox synagogue in Venice, California.

"The more things change, the more you must depend upon those things that never change" is a theme that the rabbi injects into his presentations. With his compelling application of permanent principles that address the practical problems that plague individuals, families and our nation, he has won the admiration of followers and fans all around the world.

Rabbi Lapin is a frequent speaker for hundreds of trade groups, political, social and civic institutions, financial conferences, organizations, and companies. He speaks regularly at universities, synagogues and churches throughout the country. He regularly appears on both national and local radio and television shows.

Rabbi Lapin is a noted writer. His articles have appeared in the Wall Street Journal, National Review, Commentary, The Jewish Press, The American Enterprise, The Washington Times, Crisis, and other publications. His first book, America's Real War was a national best seller. His second book Buried Treasure; the Secrets for Living from the Lord's Language, was published in 2012. His best-seller Thou Shall Prosper: The Ten Commandments for Making Money published by John Wiley in 2009 has also been translated into Chinese and Korean. His latest project is the production of audio CD's that present thousands of years of Jewish wisdom emanating from the Bible, in ways that enhance peoples faith, finances, and friendships.

An enthusiastic boater who has sailed his family across the Pacific in their own boat, Lapin lives with his wife Susan who home schooled their seven children on Mercer Island, Washington.




Customer Reviews

If you want to change, this book can help you do so.
Elie Gindi
This is a wonderful book about human culture and the beliefs, attitudes and culture of wealth and prosperity.
B. L. Linvill
Despite its flaws, I personally found the book very, very interesting.
P. Scott Pope

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

137 of 142 people found the following review helpful By Elie Gindi on October 30, 2002
Format: Hardcover
As a business owner in a service industry I have gained more from this book than almost any other personal finance or business management book that I have read. Unlike so many others, Rabbi Daniel Lapin does not offer any quick tricks or simple solutions. He describes a powerful process of self improvement and real change that I have found to be personally exhilarating as well as already profitable. I can see how my many financially successful Jewish friends seem to follow the rabbi's prescriptions almost subconsciously. Now after seeing the business process through Rabbi Lapin's eyes I find myself finding opportunity where I never saw it before. Through the practical steps that conclude each chapter I have been able to adjust my intuitive response to people and situations and this has allowed me to negotiate more effectively. The most amazing thing is how often during my first read of Thou Shall Prosper, I exclaimed "Wow! He's right!" This stuff isn't rocket science but it is often counterintuitive. I could have used some more diagrams and clarification of some of the more complex principles but with a few rereadings, it was fine. I recommend this book for its practical ability to make you really prosper whereas before you might just have been doing OK. He says that if you want to make different things happen to you it isn't enough to do different things, you must actually become different. If you want to change, this book can help you do so. It is going to be my present of choice for many friends and relatives during this holiday season. You won't regret having it in your business library.
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83 of 86 people found the following review helpful By "billwagoner" on November 8, 2002
Format: Hardcover
There is at least one brilliant insight on almost every page of this unusual book. The author is braver than most business and personal succeess book writers. The rabbi is willing to say that you can't increase your wealth long term by merely accumulating a collection of clever tricks. Instead you actually have to become a different person. He doesn't say it because this is a finance book not a religious book but I sense that what he is dancing around is almost a 'being born again experience'. You have to help yourself be 'reborn' as a proud, confident, friendly, trustworthy business professional. Well he is right and my experiences with his advice prove it for me.
Lapin comes close to perpetuating the old anti-Semitic canard about Jews being good with money, but he does effectively condense the ancient wisdom that puts far more Jews onto the Forbes 400 list than their population figures would suggest. This is a life-changing book and one that not only can make one more financially successful but can also help one integrate one's money earning activities with one's sense of values and convictions. You'll find yourself, like me, reading it and rereading it. Great value!
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47 of 50 people found the following review helpful By Julie Celeste on November 5, 2006
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I've never been a people person, never realized the point of being one, until now. The author put this into perspective for me with this; "Judaism teaches that God designed the system to reward people for not remaining isolated from one another". I also didn't realize my own bias toward the idea of making money. Also, it isn't just about material wealth, it's about properity in all areas of your life, wealth naturally follows. This is about changing your life by changing your attitude and implementing good habits to influence prosperity in one's life. I really enjoyed this book and have recommended to everyone I know.
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28 of 29 people found the following review helpful By Judith Pieprz on October 31, 2002
Format: Hardcover
I was so thoroughly impressed with Rabbi Daniel Lapin's book, Thou Shall Prosper, that I had to write a review. In clear, concise words Rabbi Daniel Lapin explains how a few, important teachings can help you increase your financial success. For example, he explains why giving to charity in the end will help you make MORE money. Or how understanding that making money at all is a good thing and not to feel guilty that you want financial success.
After reading his book I am seeing very clearly how our society has become biased against the good 'ol American businessman. What a shame. It is just this guy who is keeping others employed and fueling our investments.
I commend Rabbi for writing this book and strongly encourage others to see how a few simple teachings can change the whole way you see your career and prosperity.
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22 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Susan Pulley on March 31, 2008
Format: Paperback
I have purchased many 'money' books over the years, and, for the most part, most of them are filled with pages and pages of 'nothing new' information (like how many times do you need to be told how to do a budget?). This book is very different. First, it contains NO fluff. It's filled with meaty stuff and one needs to be able to focus and concentrate in order to digest it all. It not only gives you valuable new ways to view money;it also gives you an inside look at the Jewish culture and why so many Jewish people are wealthy. I'm only a quarter of the way through the book, but Its already changed my attitude about money, in a positive way. This book can help you make more money if you're in business, just by changing your the way you currently approach sales. If you're looking for a substantial book on money and how to view it from a 'hope someday to be properous' perspective - this book can only help.
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