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Thoughts for Thinking Paperback – Import, 1963


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 45 pages
  • Publisher: J Giertych (1963)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0902064037
  • ISBN-13: 978-0902064034
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Jan Peczkis on January 1, 2012
Format: Paperback
This short (45-page) book consists of several paragraphs each on topics as diverse as child rearing, the nature and limitations of free will, types of love, equality of humans, and much more. Relatively little of the overall content is directly on political issues.

Probably the most interesting part of this book is Giertych's brief exposition of Roman Dmowski's views on people who vote in democracies. (pp. 27-29. Giertych knew Dmowski personally). Dmowski's views on this subject were never published, except for brief renditions in obscure Polish-language publications of the late 1920's.

Dmowski is quoted as believing in the following: "The main aspect of this system is that electing of the countries' leaders should be performed by people who are interested in the affairs of the country as a whole, and not in their interests only." (p. 28). Rich and poor citizens should pay a pro-rated fee in order to vote, and a lawbreaker would have to pay extra in order to have the privilege of voting. Voting should not be easy: There should be red-tape and other obstacles to voting.

The purpose of all this would be the following: "This would raise the electioneering on to a higher level--it would elevate the important qualities of candidates and reduce the popular appeal aspect." (p. 29). The informed reader will realize that some modern American conservatives have voiced similar ideas. For instance, those on public assistance (welfare) would not be able to vote while they are on welfare. This would give them an incentive to get off welfare, would prevent them for voting for candidates who sustain their economic dependency, and would prevent politicians from pandering to those who receive "free" monies.
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This short (45-page) book consists of several paragraphs each on topics as diverse as child rearing, the nature and limitations of free will, types of love, equality of humans, and much more. Relatively little of it is directly on political issues.

Probably the most interesting part of this book is Giertych's brief exposition of Roman Dmowski's views on people who vote in democracies. (pp. 27-29. Giertych knew Dmowski personally). Dmowski's views on this subject were never published, except for brief renditions in obscure Polish-language publications of the late 1920's.

Dmowski is quoted as believing in the following: "The main aspect of this system is that electing of the countries' leaders should be performed by people who are interested in the affairs of the country as a whole, and not in their interests only." (p. 28). Rich and poor citizens should pay a pro-rated fee in order to vote, and a lawbreaker would have to pay extra in order to have the privilege of voting. Voting should not be easy: There should be red-tape and other obstacles to voting.

The purpose of all this would be the following: "This would raise the electioneering on to a higher level--it would elevate the important qualities of candidates and reduce the popular appeal aspect." (p. 29). The informed reader will realize that some modern American conservatives have voiced similar ideas. For instance, those on public assistance (welfare) would not be able to vote while they are on welfare. This would give them an incentive to get off welfare, would prevent them for voting for candidates who sustain their economic dependency, and would prevent politicians from pandering to those who receive "free" monies.
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