Start reading A Thousand Names for Joy on the free Kindle Reading App or on your Kindle in under a minute. Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Enter a promotion code
or gift card
 
 
 

Try it free

Sample the beginning of this book for free

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Color:
Image not available

To view this video download Flash Player

 

A Thousand Names for Joy: Living in Harmony with the Way Things Are [Kindle Edition]

Byron Katie , Stephen Mitchell
4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (165 customer reviews)

Print List Price: $15.00
Kindle Price: $10.57
You Save: $4.43 (30%)
Sold by: Random House LLC

Free Kindle Reading App Anybody can read Kindle books—even without a Kindle device—with the FREE Kindle app for smartphones, tablets and computers.

To get the free app, enter your email address or mobile phone number.

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition $10.57  
Hardcover --  
Paperback $11.13  
Audible Audio Edition, Abridged $0.00 Free with your Audible trial
Audio, CD, Abridged, Audiobook $20.57  
Best Books of the Year
Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Book Description

In her first two books, Byron Katie showed how suffering can be ended by questioning the stressful thoughts that create it, through a process of self-inquiry she calls The Work. Now, in A Thousand Names for Joy, she encourages us to discover the freedom that lives on the other side of inquiry.Stephen Mitchell—the renowned translator of the Tao Te Ching—selected provocative excerpts from that ancient text as a stimulus for Katie to talk about the most essential issues that face us all: life and death, good and evil, love, work, and fulfillment. The result is a book that allows the timeless insights of the Tao Te Ching to resonate anew for us today, while offering a vivid and illuminating glimpse into the life of someone who for twenty years—ever since she “woke up to reality” one morning in 1986—has been living what Lao-tzu wrote more than 2,500 years ago.Katie’s profound, lighthearted wisdom is not theoretical; it is absolutely authentic. That is what makes this book so compelling. It’s a portrait of a woman who is imperturbably joyous, whether she is dancing with her infant granddaughter or finds that her house has been emptied out by burglars, whether she stands before a man about to kill her or embarks on the adventure of walking to the kitchen, whether she learns that she is going blind, flunks a “How Good a Lover Are You?” test, or is diagnosed with cancer. With her stories of total ease in all circumstances, Katie does more than describe the awakened mind; she lets you see it, feel it, in action. And she shows you how that mind is yours as well.


From the Hardcover edition.


Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

This unusual collaboration brings together the Way (the Tao) and the Work, Katie's form of self-inquiry and path to joy. Katie is the author of Loving What Is, and Mitchell, the noted translator of the Tao, is her husband. In each chapter of this new book, Mitchell has presented Katie with a passage from the Tao and noted down her exposition on the theme. (This oral format can result in choppy, repetitive text.) Katie's own "awakening" came in 1986, after 10 years of depression. One morning she felt a sense of freedom from her overwhelming distress, a feeling she calls "a falling-away of the self." This freedom, she claims, is available to anyone who practices the Work, which consists of asking oneself four questions intended to turn around fixed ideas and dismantle painful, knotted thoughts about the past. Four dialogues Katie has conducted with seekers illustrate the Work in action. Her belief that reality is good and can only be grasped if we live in the present moment resonates with many traditional spiritual teachings, and in this genuine and fresh spiritual manifesto, Katie's engaging personality springs from the page. (Feb. 6)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Review

“Byron Katie is one of the truly great and inspiring teachers of our time. She has been enormously helpful to me personally. I love this very wise woman, and I encourage everyone to immerse themselves in this phenomenal book.”
—Dr. Wayne W. Dyer

A Thousand Names for Joy is a vivid and powerful portrait of the awakened mind. I am captivated by Katie’s clear mind and loving heart, which offer the world a simple process to find joy. Who knew? Katie did, and what a blessing she offers to us all.”
—Iyanla Vanzant, founder, Inner Visions Institute

“Katie’s teachings and everyday life are pure wisdom. A Thousand Names for Joy shows us the way to inner peace, and she directs us there fearlessly, relentlessly, and with utmost generosity. I have rarely seen anyone—spiritual teachers included—embody wisdom as powerfully as Katie in her passionate embrace of each and every moment.”
—Roshi Bernie Glassman

“Byron Katie’s Work . . . acts like a razor-sharp sword that cuts through illusion and enables you to know for yourself the timeless essence of your being.”
—Eckhart Tolle, author of The Power of Now


From the Hardcover edition.

Product Details

  • File Size: 236 KB
  • Print Length: 306 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 0307339238
  • Publisher: Harmony (February 6, 2007)
  • Sold by: Random House LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B000NJL7MI
  • Text-to-Speech: Not enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #59,831 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images?


Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
127 of 132 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A GUIDE TO FEARLESSNESS February 6, 2007
By Susan
Format:Hardcover
Katie's work is absolutely different from anyone else's. Most self-help books aren't really about anyone's "self" except the author's. They provide you with their ideas about how you can be happy, and these ideas are supposed to work for everyone. But instead of offering a one-size-fits-all strategy, Katie has shown me how to craft my own solutions, under any and all circumstances. The value of this really can't be overstated.

In addition to helping me with problems after they've arisen, Katie's work showed me how to stop the problems from arising in the first place. I've learned that the way to counterbalance difficult emotions is not necessarily to explore or analyze them, but to catch them as they present themselves, question their validity, and then simply let them go. Once I examine any thought whatsoever, I'm struck by what it really, truly is in the first place: a thought. A thought has no bearing on reality. If you're suffering from a broken heart, for example, when you look, you see that your heart is not really broken. No matter how hard you try, you literally cannot find a broken heart. There is only the thought that a broken heart exists. The funny thing is that if you stop thinking that thought, the heartbreak also stops--not because you've healed it, but because it was never there anyway.

It can be difficult to believe that it's this simple, but it is. Most self-help strategies are detailed commentaries on complex psychological or spiritual theories. But Katie's suggestions are almost pre-psychology and even pre-spirituality. They're about how the mind naturally works, no matter how you were raised or what you believe.
Read more ›
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
225 of 239 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars This book doesn't make as much sense to me October 30, 2007
Format:Hardcover
I wrote a glowing review for "Loving What Is," so it only seems right that I give my impression of this book. I didn't enjoy it as much, and it left me with a very confused impression of who Byron Katie is, and what she actually believes.

I'm not discounting Katie's experiences, but in reading it I occasionally got a sense of contrived ingenuousness. Sometimes it's innocent enough ("I trip and fall down. It must be time for a rest!") other times it's almost heartless, such as when she runs into friends of the family she hasn't seen in several years, and when they ask "how is your dear mother" she replies, "She's wonderful. She's dead." She goes on to write: "Silence. The smiles were gone. I saw that they were having a problem, but I didn't know what it was. When [my daughter] and I were outside the store, she turned to me and said "Mom, when you talk to people like that, they can't handle it." That hadn't occurred to me. I was just telling the truth."

This is a sixty year old woman writing. No matter what happened to her to change her worldview so substantially, surely she still has an idea of social mores and compassion. When my mother dies someday, and if I run into some old friends of hers, I would expect to tell them the news in a kinder way.

Later in the book she talks about the fact that loving what is can seem heartless, and says that no matter what happens -- no matter how terrible -- she rejoices in it. "When I woke up from the dream of Byron Katie, there was nothing left, and the nothing was benevolent. It's so benevolent that it wouldn't reappear, it wouldn't re-create itself. The worst thing could happen, the worst imagination of horror...and it would see that as grace, it would even celebrate, it would open its arms and sing "Hallelujah! ...
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you?
143 of 152 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Tao Meets The Work March 5, 2007
Format:Hardcover
"To think that we need sadness or outrage to motivate us to do what's right is insane. As if the clearer and happier you get, the less kind you become. As if when someone finds freedom, she just sits around all day with drool running down her chin. My experience is the opposite. Love is action. It's clear, it's kind, it's effortless, and it's irresistible." - From A Thousand Names for Joy

Several years ago, Loving What Is: Four Questions That Can Change Your Life by Byron Katie hit the bestseller list and introduced thousands of people to The Work. Katie then took readers further into this simple, but profound, process in her book I Need Your Love--Is That True?, whereby Katie invited individuals to question everything they say, do or think in order to secure love, approval, or appreciation from others.

Now, in the book A Thousand Names for Joy: Living in Harmony with the Way Things Are, Katie provides an intimate glimpse into a subject that she doesn't normally talk about--her everyday life. From babysitting her grandchild to experiencing painful corneal blisters, sipping a cup of tea to sitting with a dying friend, Katie show us The Work in action--and how she exquisitely inhabits a fluid world without boundaries or demarcation.

Teaming up with her author/translator husband Stephen Mitchell, Katie elaborates on short excerpts from the Tao Te Ching from her own unique standpoint. At core, Katie challenges us--and our most cherished beliefs--by reminding us that unquestioned thoughts are the source of all stress and suffering. No person, lack, diagnosis, death, accident, tsunami, war, or illness causes suffering--only our unquestioned thoughts about such things.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Recent Customer Reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
Love Byron Katie. Had a we ekend with her at Kripalu a few years ago. Very helpful
Published 1 day ago by Ann R. Levine
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
So much good food for thought.
Published 4 days ago by mo
4.0 out of 5 stars Four Stars
I like the connection with the Tao writtings. Can pick it up and read short sections anytime.
Published 1 month ago by Liz
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
She's great. What's not to love?
Published 1 month ago by K-lee Starland
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
I really enjoy her philosophy on life. Everything is really for you, not against you.
Published 1 month ago by Alan F. Burd
5.0 out of 5 stars Katie and the Tao
My gratitude for Byron Katie (whose incredibly skillful tool for investigation called “The Work” has been one of the great gifts of my life) increased when reading this book. Read more
Published 1 month ago by Joyce
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
gift
Published 2 months ago by BEK DARR
5.0 out of 5 stars What an awesome way to perceive being alive
Yet another life changing book by Byron Katie. Such a fresh perspective that can shift you even out of a long-standing depression, into a lighter, happier more fulfilling way of... Read more
Published 2 months ago by Lisa Talev
5.0 out of 5 stars Collection of quotes to meditate on...
I love all Katie's works, and 'The Work'. It has totally transformed my life, and thus has also touched those close to me as well. This book reads like a collection of meditations. Read more
Published 2 months ago by emrm
5.0 out of 5 stars This woman has tapped into something like "universal understanding'...
This woman has tapped into something like "universal understanding' and she has been able to articulate it so beautifully! Reading this book immediately calms me down!...
Published 3 months ago by Georgina Thompson
Search Customer Reviews
Search these reviews only

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.


Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 


Look for Similar Items by Category