Buy New
$14.09
Qty:1
  • List Price: $17.00
  • Save: $2.91 (17%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Three Plays by Terrence Mcnally (Plume Drama) Paperback – August 31, 1990


Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$14.09
$9.61 $0.01

Frequently Bought Together

Three Plays by Terrence Mcnally (Plume Drama) + The Collected Plays of Edward Albee: 1966 - 1977
Price for both: $33.89

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Series: Plume Drama
  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Plume (August 31, 1990)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0452264251
  • ISBN-13: 978-0452264250
  • Product Dimensions: 7.9 x 5.5 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #480,685 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Terrence McNally is the author of numerous plays, including Love! Valour! Compassion! (winner of the Tony Award for best play), The Ritz, and Frankie and Johnny in the Claire de Lune, which was made into a feature film starring Al Pacino and Michelle Pfeiffer, and the books for the musicals The Rink, and Kiss of the Spider Woman (winner of the Tony Award for the best book of a musical). Other successes include Lips Together, Teeth Apart and The Lisbon Traviata. McNally has received two Guggenheim Fellowships, a Rockefeller Grant, and a citation from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. He also serves as vice president for the Dramatists Guild, the national orgainzation of playwrights, composers, and lyricists. He lives in New York City.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
3
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 4 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Sean on January 1, 2002
Format: Paperback
This collection of three plays is such an amazing example of McNally's work. "The Libson Traviata" is an emotional play, dealt with such tenderness and wit. "Frankie and Johnnie" is a wonderful play full of compassion and humor, making light of a situation. "It's Only A Play" is a very funny, yet touching play that is a must-read for fans of McNally. Terrence McNally, you are amazing!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Kelly on May 19, 2000
Format: Paperback
This collection is worth getting simply for the second play 'Frankie and Johnny in the Clair de Lune'. Yes, I'm sure you have all seen the film with Al Pacino, but the play version is much more detailed. The relationship between Frankie and Johnny, as seen from dusk till dawn, is one of the most intense, moving and powerful ever written.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Terrence McNally's works are sort of fickle creatures. Compelling to read, intimidating and overwhelming to produce.

McNally's greatest strength in all three works are the unparalleled depth of character. There are no cliches, there are no stock characters, there are no moments of reliance on tired or established conventions. He has done what should be considered the pinnacle of any creative writing: created living breathing people with their own wants, desires, histories and futures. Where the plays fall short as pieces designed to be produced is in their lack of relatability. This is less palpalbe with Franie and Johnny, which is a love story at heart and as such will always be relatable on a basic level. But all three are so unapologitically east coast, undeniably new york and unmistakably 80's that it makes them incredibly hard to relate to if you don't have a familiarity or connection to those three things. I dare say that "It's only a Play", a comedy about the 1980's NY theatre seen using real people as characters, would be unproducable today outside of NYC and even then only as a "period piece" for an aging crowd.

In short, any devotee of the theatre and any student of playwriting should read the Lisbon Traviata and Frankie and Johnny (It's Only a Play can wait until you've got extra time). They are marvels of character development and a benchmark that we all should strive for. Just take care when thinking about producing.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback
The Lisbon Traviata has its moments, and again and again Frankie and Johnnie has been revived with great success, but for me It's Only a Play is the real winner of this indispensable collection by Terrence McNally, who wrote the book for THE RINK many moons ago. The madcap life of the theater has not so well been written about since the heyday of Moss Hart and his 1948 comedy-drama Light Up The Sky. In McNally's play, a Manhattan producer is celebrating the first night of a new play by throwing a wild party to which Lauren Bacall and Lena Horne are only two of the celebrity guests to show up. (There's also the whole cast of Singin' In The Rain, in yellow slickers.) We see none of this, however, for the action of the play is confined to the top floor bedroom in the swank apartment of Julia, whose dog, the ferocious Torch, is locked up in the bathroom barking furiously. The dog is said to have mauled the face off of poor Arlene Francis, from TV's "What's My Line?" -- Yes, the play is very much set in its own time (the 1980s) and many of the celebrities said to be attending Julia's party below are now, alas, no longer with us (Mary Martin, Helen Hayes, etc).

Meanwhile the theater's meanest critic, Ira Drew, is circulating, wondering why people don't appreciate his bon mots. The drugged up leading lady, Virginia, is so high she can rarely recognize the people she's speaking to. And the poor author, Peter, is waiting biting his nails, hoping for a favorable New York Times review from Frank Rich for that, after all, is what determines if any particular play closes or stays afloat. There's a wannabe actor, Gus, whose job is to haul all the mink coats upstairs and plop them on the bed.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?