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Comment: TITLE: THREE VIEWS ON THE MILLENNIUM & BEYONDAUTHOR: BOCK, DARRELLISBN 10: 0310201438ISBN 13: 9780310201434BINDING: PaperbackPUBLICATION DATE: 1999PAGES: 330DESCRIPTION: This volume will have extensive marking/highlighting and-or bent pages and-or dinged pages/corners and-or weak/broken hinges and-or library stickers, stamps, or pouches and-or mildew and-or water damage. This volume will be usable but won't be pretty. Transit time: 5-24 Days.
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Product Details

  • Series: Counterpoints: Bible and Theology
  • Paperback: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Zondervan; 1ST edition (February 23, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0310201438
  • ISBN-13: 978-0310201434
  • Product Dimensions: 5.3 x 0.9 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #86,174 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

The Book of Revelation. The Millennium. Two of the most fascinating and widely disputed topics in modern Christianity. What are we to make of the Bible's rich apocalyptic imagery? How much of it is a historical account? How much is prophecy that is unfolding today or that has yet to unfold, and how much illustrates timeless truths that transcend specific events of the past, present, or future? Two additions to the Counterpoints series now provide a forum for presentation and critique of, and interaction among, the predominant views on the book of Revelation and on the millennial reign of Christ and his Church. The contributors are eminently qualified to represent their various schools of thought. Like the other Counterpoints books, each of these volumes allows the reader to set the different views side by side to compare their strengths and weaknesses, gaining a better appreciation for other perspectives while strengthening or redefining his or her own. The premillennial, amillennial, and postmillennial views are presented, critiqued, and defended in turn, beginning with editor Darrell Bock's overview of the different viewpoints.

From the Author

Darrell L. Bock (Ph.D., University of Aberdeen) is professor of New Testament at Dallas Theological Seminary. Craig A. Blaising (Ph.D., University of Aberdeen) is the Joseph Emerson Brown professor of Christian Theology at Southern Baptist Theological College in Louisville, Kentucky. Kenneth L. Gentry Jr. (Th.D., Whitefield Theological Seminary) is professor of New Testament at Bahnsen Theological Seminary in Placentia, California. Robert Strimple (Ph.D., Trinity College, University of Toronto) is professor of Systematic Theology at Westminster Theological Seminary

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Customer Reviews

Gentry - His presentation is very well done- I've read his works before.
"kerry195"
A great introduction that I encourage those interested in eschatology to purchase.
John Wolf
This book gives a great presentation of the postmillennial and amillennial views.
David R. Bess

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

33 of 34 people found the following review helpful By Robert Burns on December 7, 2004
Format: Paperback
In investigating the issue of the millennium, where should you start? Ultimately, I think this book makes the wrong choices in answering this question. While the discussion is interesting at times, I can't help but feel that Darrell Bock's summary essay should have been re-worked and presented at the beginning of the work. Basically, Bock writes that one's hermeneutical approach (the prism by which one interprets Scripture) largely determines what you believe the end times looks like. Bock notes how each passage deals with eschatological texts, and what questions each feels are key to understanding the nature of Jesus' return. If he had placed this at the beginning, I think it would be more helpful to the reader. Perhaps he could have then placed another essay "wrapping things up" at the end.

Kenneth Gentry Jr. contributes the postmillennial perspective, but does a much better job critiquing the positions of the others than advancing his own case. In his own essay, he really needed to a) explain his own hermeneutical approach in a coherent and distinctive fashion, rather than use generalities, and b) take the time to formulate a detailed explanation of how postmillennialism interprets Revelation 20 (the key text). As someone who considers himself sympathetic to postmillennialism's expectation that God's Kingdom is irrestibly advancing even in this current age, I really wanted Gentry to make a solid case. After all, Jonathan Edwards (arguably the greatest American mind ever) was post-mil, so surely it's a reasonable position. Alas.

Robert Strimple presents the amillennial position and does an excellent job presenting his overall hermeneutic and understanding of key passages. Of all the essays, his is probably the best.
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32 of 35 people found the following review helpful By David R. Bess VINE VOICE on January 8, 2002
Format: Paperback
I have read a few comparison books on eschatology in general and the millennium in particular. This one is the best yet on the millennium. I would have given it five stars, except for the mediocrity of the premillennial presentation.
Gentry, as usual, expresses himself very well and is very convincing, both in his own essay as well as in his responses. Strimple, considering the limitations of this work, does a fine job of covering various Scriptures that address the amillennialist position. The worst essay of the three is penned by Blaising, who takes entirely too many pages to explain the premillennial stance. He gets bogged down in the history of premillennialism, and then is so technical in the actual presentation of his own view that he is very tough to follow. The reader comes away scratching his/her head wondering what in the world did Blaising actually say! Premillennialism, however, is so commonplace that it requires the least explanation of the three positions.
Bock provides a very cordial, conciliatory conclusion, touching upon points that are crucial to formulating one's own view of Revelation 20:1-6. I was rather surprised when he revealed his own position near the end of his essay, for I certainly did not detect it through his earlier remarks.
This book gives a great presentation of the postmillennial and amillennial views. The presentation for premillennialism pales in comparison, but other readers may find Blaising's essay more helpful than I did.
Overall, this work is a good investment for anyone wanting to compare the three basic millennial views.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Todd Grotenhuis on December 20, 1999
Format: Paperback
This book is an excellent exploration into the varying millennial views. Each author presents myriads of Biblical and theological evidence in making his case. For those who are uncertain of the basis for differing millennial views, this volume will clear up the questions. The responses that each author presents to his colleagues' views are also very well thought out. The book is somewhat technical and assumes the reader's understanding of some basic theological terms; I found myself needing to take extensive notes on the book to adequately process the information presented. Nonetheless, Bock and company do a marvelously comprehensive job of highlighting the strengths and weaknesses of the differing positions, allowing the reader to make a fully informed decision him- or herself.
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15 of 20 people found the following review helpful By "kerry195" on July 3, 2000
Format: Paperback
I picked up this book almost immediately after it came in the store. I found it both enlightening and very educational, as I learned more about the pressupositional mindset that underlies the hermeutical methodology that all three viewpoints uses in approaching scripture.
Gentry - His presentation is very well done- I've read his works before. However, his rebuttal of the premill position was very poor in quality (all he did was restate his previous arguments...which are really only impressive to postmill and amill folks).
Strimple - spends most of his time attacking premillennialism, sadly. He does, however, present an accurate case for amillennialism. In fact, he confuses premillennialism and dispensationalism, treating them as synonyms. His rebuttals to the other positions aren't really too impressive and he and Gentry pretty much did the same thing (repeat their earlier arguments instead of really interacting with Blaising's presentation).
Blaising - does a wonderful job of exegetically presenting his case for premillennialism. Blaising's response to amillennialism and postmillennialism is pretty good.
Bock's essay - Bock's essay summed up the whole book well. This book won't really 'convince' anyone of either view if you already come to it holding certain viewpoints about what is 'proper' and 'fitting' in our understanding and application hermenutics to the text.
Overall- I'd recommend this book. I find it interesting that myself (I'm premill dispensational) and another reader (amill) both read the book and came to two different conclusions about who 'won' the debate.
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