Thucydides: Narrative and Explanation and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$51.33
Qty:1
  • List Price: $55.00
  • Save: $3.67 (7%)
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Trade in your item
Get a $1.72
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Thucydides: Narrative and Explanation (Oxford Classical Monographs) Paperback – October 7, 2004

ISBN-13: 978-0199275854 ISBN-10: 0199275858

Buy New
Price: $51.33
21 New from $46.31 18 Used from $47.18
Amazon Price New from Used from
eTextbook
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$51.33
$46.31 $47.18

Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

The Good Girl by Mary Kubica
Discover an addictive, suspenseful debut thriller filled with twists and turns that will keep you engrossed from start to finish. Learn more

Product Details

  • Series: Oxford Classical Monographs
  • Paperback: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press (October 7, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0199275858
  • ISBN-13: 978-0199275854
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.9 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.1 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,050,525 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review


"Stimulating and important.... Rood has much to say that is new and exciting. He has brought to the task wide reading and a great sensitivity to his author, and he has applied the techniques of narratology to Thucydides' text (dare I say, to any ancient historical text) more expertly than anyone before.... A rich and sensitive reading of Thucydides.... The fundamental starting point for future analyses."--Bryn Mawr Classical Review


"A careful and subtle book, and a very important one for historians as well as literary students of Thucydides.... A really accomplished work of scholarship."--Classical Philology


"A fascinating and important work."--Classical Review


"All students of Thucydides will benefit from this book, and undergraduates will be particularly well served by the introduction, which offers an unbeatable summary of the Peloponnesian War and overview of Thucydides' oeuvre."--The Classical Outlook


"Rood succeeds admirably and convincingly in showing how internal disunity led to Athens' defeat in war.... The real merit of Rood's study consists in the detail with which he supports his contentions."--Classical World


"Rood makes the case for a fresh reading of the great Greek historian, literary stylist, and student of human nature using the tools of modern narratology....Upper-division undergraduates and above."--Choice


About the Author


Tim Rood is Lecturer in Classical Languages and Literature at the University of Oxford.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

3.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
0
4 star
1
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By James Jan Sullivan on October 4, 2005
Format: Paperback
Tim Rood's book has become a must read for students of Thucydides, a rare accomplishment for an author so widely written about. Rood, building upon the foundations of W.R. Connor's 1984 THUCYDIDES and the work of Simon Hornblower, which are both scrupulously noted, applies the theoretical approach of narratology to Thucydides' history. In short, narratology, when applied to historical works, argues that we read the text not as an objective representation of past reality but as a rhetorical product. To this end, Rood and the narratologists suggest applying tools culled from the workshop of literary criticism to help explicate the text, e.g. focalization, temporal anachrony, etc.

This is an obviously salutary approach, judging by the results. Many passages that have long frustrated critics have been addressed from fresh angles and the history as a whole has been given a new explanation. The theoretical approach will frustrate those who are used to more conventional approaches and the insistence on the non-objective status of historical texts is always a kind of heresy to some. But for those willing to accept (or overlook) these matters, there is much to admire in Rood's incisive and careful analyses.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on March 23, 2000
Format: Hardcover
As a relative new-comer to the delights of Thucydides I was at first a little in awe of the author's obvious scholarship. The book was rigorous and well-ordered, as I had expected, having heard much of Timothy Rood's abilities while at University. In particular, the areas of the book where Mr Rood moved from the specific to the general were a delight, and I hope that he should see fit to expand his horizons a little were he to author another work in this field. Chapter 5 of the book, where he animadverts to the inevitable tension between the narrative and dialogic elements of the "History", is particularly luminous. Areas that could have been explicated better include the bizarre episode involving the bathing of soldiers' feet in hot water, referred to in Chapter 7, something that has mystified Thucydides scholars for years, and the barely comprehensible references to drunkenness that pepper later parts of the "History". Aside from those few omissions and a litter of singular infelicities of expression in the last two chapters, the work is a numinous one, indispensable for all advanced students wishing to immerse themselves, to quote Gustave Sephier, in "the clamorous and vociferating uproar of Thucydidean narrative".
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search