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Thuvia, Maid of Mars (Martian Tales #4) Mass Market Paperback – April 12, 1979


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Product Details

  • Series: Mars (del Rey Books Numbered) (Book 4)
  • Mass Market Paperback: 160 pages
  • Publisher: Del Rey (April 12, 1979)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0345278372
  • ISBN-13: 978-0345278371
  • Product Dimensions: 6.9 x 4.1 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (105 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,566,493 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

This, the fourth in Burroughs's Martian series, is not expected to make B&B rich, but it does appeal to fans like company president Beth Baxter and Burroughs's faithful audience. Stan Winiarski takes on the narration.
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From the Publisher

This book is a standard print version using a minimum of 10 point type in a 6 by 9 inch size and perfect bound - a paperback. As with all Quiet Vision print books, it use a high grade, acid free paper for long life. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

I wish I had read the books first.
Richard
I first read this book and this series some 52 years ago...I recently dug them out and had another go.
D. Blankenship
I highly reccomend this book to anyone who loves sci fi.
Thomas Paul Loy

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By s.ferber on February 18, 2003
Format: Paperback
"Thuvia, Maid of Mars" is the 4th of 11 John Carter novels from the pen of Edgar Rice Burroughs. It first appeared in April 1916, as a three-part serial in the magazine "All Story Weekly." This is the first Carter novel that does not feature John Carter himself as the central character; he only makes a brief cameo appearance early on. Instead, the action mantle is taken up by Carthoris, Carter's son, but fortunately, Carter Junior turns out to be just as good a swashbuckler as the old man. In this installment, Princess Thuvia of Ptarth has been kidnapped by the spineless Prince Astok of Dusar, which abduction almost causes a world war on Barsoom (Mars). Young Carthoris, in his quest to free his beloved princess, runs across deserted cities, a forgotten kingdom, banths (10-legged Barsoomian lions), ethereal warriors, mucho swordplay, giant white apes, and on and on. As is usual for these books, the amount of action that Burroughs packs into a small compass is quite surprising. Whereas previous Carter books seem to read more like fantasy/fairy tales than science fiction, this installment veers even more to the fantastic, mainly in the use of those phantom warriors just mentioned. These bowmen are called up from the minds of the remaining members of the lost city of Lothar, and have no "real" concrete existence. However, their arrows can still kill. In this book we also get, for the first time, a nice, detailed look at life in Helium; what the people do, how they live and the like. We also receive a biological explanation of how Carthoris, who was 10 years old but a seeming adult in the previous books, got to be that way.Read more ›
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By D. Blankenship HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on October 2, 2004
Format: Paperback
I first read this book and this series some 52 years ago...I recently dug them out and had another go. They are as fun now as they were then. Burroughs' style is absolutely great and needs to be savored. The books are action packed and certainly reflet a time in our society long past. I feel to understand current SiFi and S&S, you really need to start during this time period. We certainly have come along way, in may ways, but it is very evident that this writer and his contemporaries certainly had a profound influence on what we are getting today. This are books for little boys and girls and thank goodness I have enough of that little boy in me to still enjoy them.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Lawrance M. Bernabo HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on August 26, 2003
Format: Audio CD
It took the first three volumes of his Martian series for Edgar Rice Burroughs to get his hero John Carter, former cavalier of Virginia, and Dejah Thoris, princess of Helium to the point where they could live happily ever after. Satisfied with the combination of romance and pulp adventure, this fourth Martian novel turns to the next generation of Barsoomians. Cathoris, son of the Warlord of Mars and his beloved princess, is one of two princes and a Jeddak who are seeking the hand of the Thuvia of Ptarth. When she is kidnapped by the sinister Prince Astok of Dusar, the entire planet is about to be thrown into a bloody war and Cathoris has to follow in his father's footstep and deal with savage beasts and phantom armies as he rescues Thuvia and saves Barsoom from a costly war. Of course, by the time he catches up with his beloved, Cathoris finds the situation is slightly more complicated than he thought, mainly because ERB never provides a smooth ending for his couples.
"Thuvia, Maid of Mars" was originally serialized in "All-Story Weekly" in April 1916, which explains the novel's subtext about world war, since one was going on in Europe at that point in time. The original title was "Cathoris," but apparently when it was published as a novel in 1920 somebody wised up and changed it. Thuvia is not as great a name as Deja Thoris, but it is not bad. In many ways this is like the previous novel, "The Warlord of Mars," where the hero chases his beloved across the landscape of Barsoom and has to deal with green men and white apes. Fortunately, unlike ERB's Tarzan series, "Thuvia, Maid of Mars" is really the only time that repeats himself like this in the Martian series, which stands out as his best as he proves in the next and most inventive volume in the series, "Chessmen of Mars."
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25 of 33 people found the following review helpful By "tom@callahan.org" on February 28, 2001
Format: Paperback
Don't take the star rating wrong - this is as good as any of the other books in this series, but this edition (Quiet Vision Publishing - paperback, printed in 2000) is the cheapest printing of a book I've ever seen. Only about 20 pages into it, pages started falling out of the back. The type is huge and goes all the way to the edge of the page so your thumbs are constantly in the way while you're trying to read, and there are typographical errors like using two hyphens instead of em dashes. I know they make an electronic version of this book. As part of my job I convert a lot of print-intended content to digital publishing formats, and that's what usually happens to em dashes during that process, so I almost wonder if they just printed out their digital version and bound it. It looks like it was printed on a laser printer (especially the terrible cover illustration which looks like it was drawn by a 12-year old), and the fonts look like they're just PC-standard 'Times'. There are also several footnotes, which in the original edition that I read years ago were placed at the bottom of the page they were referenced from. In this edition they're in the back of the book.
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