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Tied Up in Tinsel (Roderick Alleyn Mysteries) MP3 CD – November 20, 2010


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Product Details

  • Series: Roderick Alleyn Mysteries
  • MP3 CD
  • Publisher: Blackstone Audiobooks; MP3 Una edition (November 20, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1441746838
  • ISBN-13: 978-1441746832
  • Product Dimensions: 7.4 x 5.4 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 0.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,660,128 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"It's time to start comparing Christie to Marsh instead of the other way around."--New York magazine
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

From her first book in 1934 to her final volume just before her death on 1982, Ngaio Marsh's work has remained legendary, and is often compared to that of Agatha Christie, Margery Allingham, and Dorothy L. Sayers. During her celebrated fifty-year career, Marsh was made a Grand Master by the Mystery Writers of America, was named a Dame Commander, Order of the British Empire, won numerous prestigious awards, and penned 32 mystery novels. So sit back, draw the curtains, lock the doors, and put yourself in the hands of the Grande Dame of detective novels...
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Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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The plot was full of twists, and the characters were very well developed.
Llioana
If you enjoy Agatha Christie, Georgette Heyer's crime novels and Patricia Wentworth's writing then you may enjoy Ngaio Marsh.
Damaskcat
I would have ranked the book higher, except that the identity of the murderer became fairly clear a little too early.
MK Writer

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Patrick W. Crabtree VINE VOICE on October 3, 2008
Format: Paperback
Ngaio Marsh (1895-1982) wrote this one just ten years prior to her death. It's a formula cozy murder, much in the vein of her other Inspector Roderick Alleyn/Detective Fox series entries.

THE STORY here is that a rich aristocrat (Hilary Bill-Tasman) has re-purchased his noble family's run-down former estate and he's restoring the Manor House (Halberds Manor). Along with that he's bringing a young and beautiful wife into the home, a caveat of which not everyone approves. To add even more to the accoutrements Hilary has hired Inspector Alleyns' wife, the renowned Troy, to paint his portrait (a Marsh theme that we've seen before in Final Curtain, 1947).

To commemorate the event, Hilary has invited his close relatives to celebrate a community Christmas at his not-quite-finished home, where the locals and their children are provided with gifts and subsequently fed a nice supper. Instead of Santa, Hilary opts for an ancient folklore Druid character to deliver the gifts. Providing the domestic service at the event is Hilary's staff, comprised in part of five men who have previously been convicted of murder -- but they've all been rehabilitated... or have they?

In any case, Hilary's eccentric and aged Uncle F. Fleaton Forrester ("Uncle Flea") is supposed to play the Druid role but he falls ill and his personal manservant, Moult, has to take on the task at the last minute. Moult has been somewhat at odds with Hilary's unusual house staff members but it comes as a great surprise to all when Moult comes up missing just after the gifts are distributed.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By MK Writer on September 5, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Very entertaining mystery that takes place in a wealthy eccentric's enormous home. Troy Alleyn has been commissioned to paint Hilary (a man) Bill-Tasman's portrait during the Christmas holiday. While she knows that he's eccentric, she doesn't count on the fact that he likes to staff his house with ex-convicts ("onecers")from the local prison. When their crimes start repeating themselves in the great house and a missing person turns up dead, Inspector Alleyn is unwillingly pulled into the picture, taking charge of the investigation. I would have ranked the book higher, except that the identity of the murderer became fairly clear a little too early.
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 20, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I really liked this particular Inspector Alleyn mystery. I've read quite a few of Marsh's books, and this one really sucked me in. I read it over the holidays on purpose, to put me in the mood. Didn't really work since it doesn't snow here, but it was nice to *read* about snow. At any rate, I loved the notion of the Man of the House having ex-convicts as his staff. I knew who had actually committed the murder in question, from the start (I had a hunch), and I was right, in the end. However, that in no way detracted from the pleasure of the story. I was glad, too, that the central figure was Troy, this time, rather than Roderick. Made a nice change. Her character is wonderful! Anyhoo, great story, all around. I just finished "Artists in Crime", too, and would give that 5 stars, also. There's a few Alleyn mysteries I would *not* give 5 stars to, so don't think me a fawning fan. These two books were exceptional.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Geneva Christie on August 11, 2009
Format: Audio Cassette
First, let me be clear. I do like this mystery. In fact, I very much like all of Ngaio Marsh's body of work. However, this audio narrator chose to pronounce the leading character's name differently than the author intended, which unfortunately was distracting to me, and interfered more than a bit with my listening enjoyment.
The case in point is that Chief Detective Inspector Roderick Alleyn's name ought to sound like Allen/Allan. Ngaio Marsh gently pointed it out in another of her novels featuring Alleyn (Vintage Murder, c1937) by including not one, but three, mentions at different points that individuals hearing Alleyn's name wrongly assumed that it was Allen. Even the passenger list for his Pacific crossing had his name misspelled. In the storyline, Alleyn hadn't corrected the shipboard listing from "Mr. R. Allen" to his actual name because he welcomed the anonymity it afforded him. Vintage Murder is set during a journey while Alleyn was traveling abroad for health reasons but had recently led several highly-publicized murder investigations back in England. Alleyn wants the peace of being casually taken for a "Mr. Allen" of no particular distinction or notability.
In addition, the source and the reason for choosing Alleyn's name and its pronounciation are explained by Ngaio Marsh in Death In The Air.
Enjoy Tied Up In Tinsel, this mystery at Halberds Manor. Enjoy the storyline and its glimpse into the long-gone elegance of the 1930's. Enjoy Alleyn and his artist wife Troy, and each of the quite remarkable characters assembled at Halberds Manor over the festive season.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Kristen A. Criado on December 30, 2001
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This was the first Inspector Alleyn mystery I ever read so it holds an extra special place in my heart. Marvelous characters and a great mystery make this one of Marsh's best. The character of Troy Alleyn, a respected portrait painter, starts off the tale never expecting to be plunged into intrigue. She more than manages to hold her own until her husband is called in to solve the case. Quirky players, a little twisted holiday spirit, and the standard Ngaio Marsh wit make this book stellar. A must read and a great first book for Marsh newcomers.
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