Customer Reviews

3,649
4.2 out of 5 stars
Tiffen 62mm UV Protection Filter
Size: 62mmPackage Type: Standard PackagingChange
Price:$7.74 + Free shipping
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96 of 114 people found the following review helpful
on March 14, 2005
Tiffen filters use cheap, optically low-grade "GREEN" glass. Get a Hoya UV filter. It's only $6 more.
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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
on February 17, 2006
The product felt strong, solid, and well put together. The glass was clear with no visible tint or imperfections. Although this and another filter (same type different size) both arrived with smudges on the glass. The smudges were fairly easy to wipe off, but I suspect the items are either not cleaned before packaging, or I received someone's returned item. However, I had to return this item since they DON'T contain any anti-glare/reflective coating on them. When shooting towards a light source (light bulb, tv, sun, etc) a green reflection of the light source would appear on the recorded image. The green reflected image was caused by a reflection bouncing off of my lens's green tinted anti-glare coating which was bounced right back into the camera by this filter. If your lens isn't coated in an anti-glare coating the result will be even worse.

Instead I picked up Quantaray filters from a local Wolf Camera that were coated with the anti-glare. They only cost a little more, and the green reflection is now gone. Make sure you look for a filter with the anti-glare

Camera: Canon 20d, Lenses tested: 18-55, 28-135, 70-300
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40 of 46 people found the following review helpful
on September 24, 2008
People- please, think! If you're spending over $1000 on a precision piece of optics, why would you put an cheap window pane in front of it? It sucks that filters cost a bit of money, but seriously, you need to get something that's at least multicoated, and preferably B&W or Heliopan or some other good brand. For a $200 lens, this is fine. But it breaks my heart to see this "bundled" with an $1100 L lens.
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19 of 20 people found the following review helpful
on September 4, 2008
Amazon lumps together ALL the Tiffen filter reviews. So unless you specify which specific filter you are reviewing, no one will know! This makes all those reviews that say something like, "this filter made my pictures too dark/light/red/green/whatever" totally useless.

Amazon tends to lump together similar products (like all or many cameras from one manufacturer), so in general it is a good idea to specify the product you are reviewing in your Amazon reviews.
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22 of 24 people found the following review helpful
on October 24, 2006
Tiffen has been in the filter business for as long as I can remember and they make a good product for the money. Their typical filter has better quality glass than most camera store off brand filters. Not nearly as good as a Nikon or Canon branded filter some of which are built by Tiffen but to a better specification using better coatings. All that said, if you are just looking for basic UV function or lens protection from the this filter it is just fine as long as you don't have an ultra wide angle zoom or ulta wide angle lens as this filter does vignette on my Nikon 12-24mm lens. There is a newer filter made especially for ultra wide angle lenses that has a reduced ring sidewall thickness. It is naturally priced at double the price of this filter (go figure huh?).
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
This UV filter does it job to protect the lens well. The build is solid (metal construction). The glass is also descent quality.

About the performance, it absorbs some UV light. The UV light absorbtion is hardly noticeable, probably the sky 1-A and the haze filter version will absorb more UV light than this lens which is fine for me.

Now, about the one problem which is the internal reflection. I've heard many people say that it mostly happens during night or low light shooting. I found out that it is not caused directly by the low light/night situation. The internal reflection will appear when there is a strong/bright source of light in comparison to the overall exposure (the surrounding environment). To put it in example (which hopefully is easier to understand), when you take a picture of a lamp during nightime and the light is much brighter than the surrounding area then you will see the internal reflection. as you move the position of the light to be closer to the sides/corner of the picture (and not in the center of the picture), the internal reflection reduces and finally dissapear (if you move the light far enough from the center). And if the light isn't too bright/contrast compare to the surrounding environment then there will be no internal reflection. but of course most of the time, a lamp at nightime is often very bright. But the point that I'm trying to make is that the internal reflection doesn't happen all the time during low light or night time.

Additionally, the internal reflection isn't only happening at night. it can also happen in the afternoon if you are taking a picture of a sun for example. basically same rule as above, on how bright is the light source compared to the surrounding area, and as you move the sun from the center of the photo and near the side the internal reflection will move to the side/dissapear (also depending the angle). But the best way is just to remove the filter during these situations.

Hope this explanation helps you to reduce the occurence of internal reflection by identifying correctly when the internal reflection will occur and then remove the filter during those situation (which is not hard to do).

I'm actually not a fan of lens filter (any filter) as I think it will only degrade picture quality as we added another layer between the sensor and object, but I decided to use them anyway for all my lens. And I would recommend everyone to get one of this filter if you don't have any filter for your lens yet.
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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful
on March 24, 2006
I bought this filter to put on the front of the 18-70 DX lens on my Nikon D50. It works well and protects the front element of the lens from dust, dirt, fingerprints and whatnot.

It seems to cause a little vignetting (slightly darkened corners) at extreme wide angles (~18mm) -- but from what I've seen so far it isn't terribly noticeable, 'specially for the price.
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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful
on December 19, 2007
I purchased this or rather say got it FREE with Nikon d40 promotion and I was really upset with the picture quality I was getting from Nikon d40 with this filter on, one day I decided to remove this filter and try..O man what a difference...this filter add lot of whiteness in photos and you can easily see reflections...dont waste money and buy Hoya...I am going to do the same
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32 of 37 people found the following review helpful
This UV filter does it job to protect the lens well. The build is solid (metal construction). The glass is also descent quality.

About the performance, it absorbs some UV light. The UV light absorbtion is hardly noticeable, probably the sky 1-A and the haze filter version will absorb more UV light than this lens which is fine for me.

Now, about the one problem which is the internal reflection. I've heard many people say that it mostly happens during night or low light shooting. I found out that it is not caused directly by the low light/night situation. The internal reflection will appear when there is a strong/bright source of light in comparison to the overall exposure (the surrounding environment). To put it in example (which hopefully is easier to understand), when you take a picture of a lamp during nightime and the light is much brighter than the surrounding area then you will see the internal reflection. as you move the position of the light to be closer to the sides/corner of the picture (and not in the center of the picture), the internal reflection reduces and finally dissapear (if you move the light far enough from the center). And if the light isn't too bright/contrast compare to the surrounding environment then there will be no internal reflection. but of course most of the time, a lamp at nightime is often very bright. But the point that I'm trying to make is that the internal reflection doesn't happen all the time during low light or night time.

Additionally, the internal reflection isn't only happening at night. it can also happen in the afternoon if you are taking a picture of a sun for example. basically same rule as above, on how bright is the light source compared to the surrounding area, and as you move the sun from the center of the photo and near the side the internal reflection will move to the side/dissapear (also depending the angle). But the best way is just to remove the filter during these situations.

Hope this explanation helps you to reduce the occurence of internal reflection by identifying correctly when the internal reflection will occur and then remove the filter during those situation (which is not hard to do).

I'm actually not a fan of lens filter (any filter) as I think it will only degrade picture quality as we added another layer between the sensor and object, but I decided to use them anyway for all my lens. And I would recommend everyone to get one of this filter if you don't have any filter for your lens yet.

I use this filter on my Nikon 80-200mm AF-D ED IF f/2.8 lens. Very sharp and highly recommended lens.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
This UV filter does it job to protect the lens well. The build is solid (metal construction). The glass is also descent quality.

About the performance, it absorbs some UV light. The UV light absorbtion is hardly noticeable, probably the sky 1-A and the haze filter version will absorb more UV light than this lens which is fine for me.

Now, about the one problem which is the internal reflection. I've heard many people say that it mostly happens during night or low light shooting. I found out that it is not caused directly by the low light/night situation. The internal reflection will appear when there is a strong/bright source of light in comparison to the overall exposure (the surrounding environment). To put it in example (which hopefully is easier to understand), when you take a picture of a lamp during nightime and the light is much brighter than the surrounding area then you will see the internal reflection. as you move the position of the light to be closer to the sides/corner of the picture (and not in the center of the picture), the internal reflection reduces and finally dissapear (if you move the light far enough from the center). And if the light isn't too bright/contrast compare to the surrounding environment then there will be no internal reflection. but of course most of the time, a lamp at nightime is often very bright. But the point that I'm trying to make is that the internal reflection doesn't happen all the time during low light or night time.

Additionally, the internal reflection isn't only happening at night. it can also happen in the afternoon if you are taking a picture of a sun for example. basically same rule as above, on how bright is the light source compared to the surrounding area, and as you move the sun from the center of the photo and near the side the internal reflection will move to the side/dissapear (also depending the angle). But the best way is just to remove the filter during these situations.

Hope this explanation helps you to reduce the occurence of internal reflection by identifying correctly when the internal reflection will occur and then remove the filter during those situation (which is not hard to do).

I'm actually not a fan of lens filter (any filter) as I think it will only degrade picture quality as we added another layer between the sensor and object, but I decided to use them anyway for all my lens. And I would recommend everyone to get one of this filter if you don't have any filter for your lens yet.
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