Tiger Eyes and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 3 left in stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: This book has already been loved by someone else. It MIGHT have some wear and tear on the edges, have some markings in it, or be an ex-library book. Over-all it is still a good book at a great price! (if it is supposed to contain a CD or access code, that may be missing)
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Tiger Eyes Paperback – April 13, 2010


See all 39 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback, April 13, 2010
$8.99
$5.50 $0.01
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
$3.45
Best%20Books%20of%202014


Frequently Bought Together

Tiger Eyes + Just As Long As We're Together + Deenie
Price for all three: $23.38

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Gifts for Young Readers
Visit our Children's Books store to find great gifts for every child. Shop by age: Baby-2 | Ages 3-5 | Ages 6-8 | Ages 9-12.

Product Details

  • Age Range: 12 and up
  • Grade Level: 7 and up
  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Delacorte Books for Young Readers; 1 Reprint edition (April 13, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0385739893
  • ISBN-13: 978-0385739894
  • Product Dimensions: 5.6 x 0.5 x 8.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (161 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #851,561 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

After Davey's father is killed in a hold-up, she and her mother and younger brother visit relatives in New Mexico. Here Davey is befriended by a young man who helps her find the strength to carry on and conquer her fears. "This is a masterly novel."--Jean Fritz, The New York Times Book Review. Dorothy Canfield Fisher Award, An ALA Best Book for Young Adults. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From the Inside Flap

After Davey's father is killed in a hold-up, she and her mother and younger brother visit relatives in New Mexico. Here Davey is befriended by a young man who helps her find the strength to carry on and conquer her fears. "This is a masterly novel."--Jean Fritz, The New York Times Book Review. Dorothy Canfield Fisher Award, An ALA Best Book for Young Adults. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Judy Blume spent her childhood in Elizabeth, NJ, making up stories inside her head. She has spent her adult years in many places, doing the same thing, only now she writes her stories down on paper. Adults as well as children will recognize such Blume titles as: Are You There God? It's Me, Margaret; Superfudge; Blubber; Just As Long As We're Together; and Forever. She has also written the best-selling novels Wifey; Smart Women; and, Summer Sisters. More than 75 million copies of her books have been sold, and her work has been translated into twenty-six languages.
She receives thousands of letters each month from readers of all ages who share their feelings and
concerns with her.
Judy received a B.S. in education from New York University in 1961, which named her a Distinguished Alumna in 1996, the same year that American Library Association honored her with the Margaret A. Edwards Award for Lifetime Achievement. She has won more than ninety awards, none more important than those coming directly from her youngest readers.
She serves on the boards of the Author's Guild, currently as Vice President; the Society of Children's Book Writers and Illustrators, where she sponsors an award for contemporary fiction; and the National Coalition Against Censorship, working to protect intellectual freedom. In Spring 2002, Judy was a spokesperson for the Cheerios "A Book for Every Child" literacy campaign which benefited Reading is Fundamental, America's largest literacy organization. She is also the founder and trustee of The Kids Fund, a charitable and educational foundation.
Judy's first book in the Fudge series, Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing, was published in 1972. She is thrilled to be celebrating its 30th Anniversary with the publication of Double Fudge. Just as generations of fans have loved the Fudge books, generations of Judy's family have inspired them. Thirty years ago, Fudge was inspired by her son, Larry, and now Double Fudge was written at the request of her grandson, Elliot.
Judy lives on islands up and down the East Coast with her husband George Cooper. They have three grown children and one grandchild.

Customer Reviews

I would definitely recommend this book to young readers.
Michelle B. R.
Judy Blume wrote those kinds of books who helped shape me and feel like what I was going through as a kid and teenager was normal.
Crusader Rabbit
I related to the main character so I enjoyed this book, it was an easy read.
GinaDee

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

40 of 41 people found the following review helpful By Amy Aldrich on June 10, 2007
Format: Paperback
I read this because it's on the ALA's list of 100 Most Frequently Challenged Books (1990-2000) and I'm slowly working my way though the list. This is one of the few Judy Blume books I managed to miss when I was younger and I have to say, I'm quite surprised that it's on this list at all. I found absolutely nothing objectionable about the book at all. I agree that the subject matter might be unpleasant to some, but for anyone who's experienced (or might experience) the sudden (and possibly violent) loss of a loved one (and everyone does at some point in their lives) this book is an exceptional read. Not only does it deal with one families struggle to deal with the sudden, violent death of their father/husband it also deals with other types of loss and grief issues. Included in this book are the difficulty of being childless for a couple that wants children (the aunt and uncle), Wolf's experiences with the inevitable loss of his father to cancer, Jane's drinking to cope with the intense and often unrealistic expectations of her family and her own fears about wanting to live her own life but being afraid to at the same time. Tiger Eyes manages to convey an intensity of emotion with regards to each family members fear, grief, anger, and depression...and manages to do it without being depressing or having the main character wallow in it. The struggles of Davey and her Mother are very real, they "feel" authentic, you get a depth of emotion in the reading and I think that is what makes this an excellent book. I think it's a shame anyone would try to censor this, to pretend that death doesn't occur or that there aren't difficult issues in families that lead to children and/or parents making bad/self-destructive choices.Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By doctor_beth #1 HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on August 19, 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
15-year old Davey has just experienced the tragic loss of her beloved father via a robbery shooting. Her mother, unable to cope alone, accepts an offer of help from her sister-in-law, and thus Davey moves with her mother and younger brother from their home in Atlantic City to live with an aunt and uncle who are practically strangers to them in New Mexico. While there, Davey encounters unfamiliar rules, unexpected complications (eg, a friend's drinking problem), and some unlikely sources of support. As her mother deteriorates, Davey learns to cope with her own grief while at the same time negotiating the usual trials of being a high school student. A wonderful, moving book that would be especially appropriate for teens who have experienced a loss in their own lives.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By QUEEN_OF_EVERYTHING on June 14, 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Davey Wexler is merely 15 years old when her father is shot to death in a hold-up that takes place at his 7-11 store. His death means that he's not only gone for good, but that a ton of new changes are to follow. It means Davey, her mother, and her younger brother, Jason, will be moving to New Mexico to cope. It also means leaving behind the old life, along with other people she loves, such as her best friend, Lenaya, and her boyfriend, Hugh.
It takes awhile for reality to settle in over the denial Davey should naturally - and does - feel. It's ever-so hard for her to believe that, at the funeral, it is her father's body in the casket and not someone else's. She contemplates life without him and wonders if it is feasible. Perhaps this book should be titled It's Not the End of the World, rather than Judy's middle school read about divorce and how it affects a suburban family. This novel is titled TIGER EYES because Davey has gorgeous hazel eyes.
Once she arrives at Los Alamos, she naturally feels what one might feel. She's nervous about meeting people, about making new friends. She worries about how her life at a new high school will turn out. Although many parts of this story are intense, the entire novel flows smoothly and believably together and is not at all aimed at shocking audiences through violence like some may think. True to form, Judy addresses how to cope with loss and creates likable characters. I feel lucky I have yet to experience the death of a loved one and hope I don't have to any time soon. But it's something today's youth faces daily, so why not address it in modern-day literature? That's an especially wonderful way to go about it, a great way to reach readers.
After therapy, Davey's mother decides it's time to move back to New Jersey.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on December 20, 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Tiger Eyes is the story of a young woman dealing with the intense grief of the loss of her father. She goes through sadness, anger, and frustration, and yet she never loses herself in darkness; the book is sad but not depressing.

As compelling as Davey's story is, I found equally enjoyable the growth of the minor characters in the book. Her mother, devastated by her husband's death, goes through her own struggles. Although we only get part of her story through her daughter's eyes, it's easy to fill in the details and imagine her perspective. To a lesser extent, the same can be said about her aunt, uncle, Jane, and Wolf. Although not much text is written about these characters, they all feel real and complex, as if each of them has a unique story to tell.

I first read Tiger Eyes as a young adult almost 20 years ago, and I remember just being absorbed by the story line and, of course, having a huge crush on Wolf. As an adult, I find Tiger Eyes more subtle than I remembered it and full of layers -- a definite recommend.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?