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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A must read for all people in emerging markets
A very compelling read indeed. Many similarities with old-new China & India & in my context I could visualize where India would be in next few years & what problems would arise.

Your personal tale & connecting it with your professional work gives diverse perspectives. The struggles of yours are highly motivational.

With 2 kids and having moved them...
Published 7 months ago by Sunil Kulkarni

versus
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars book could have been more analytical
The book is an extremely well written chronicle of the authors life from childhood to the present. She chronicles her childhood and educational upbringing in fascinating detail with the impact of being bought under a strict disciplinarian particularly disturbing.

Though she expounds on her discipline , hard work ethic and ability to overcome many obstacles the...
Published 8 months ago by RH


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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A must read for all people in emerging markets, January 19, 2014
A very compelling read indeed. Many similarities with old-new China & India & in my context I could visualize where India would be in next few years & what problems would arise.

Your personal tale & connecting it with your professional work gives diverse perspectives. The struggles of yours are highly motivational.

With 2 kids and having moved them recently from Japan (IB schooling) to India (local schooling), we as parents are struggling as to which route to take - and your last chapter actually convinced me to choose something that we believed.

Lastly you have explained some financial concepts very simply and overall kept the tone of the book practical(not advisory).

I think this book should be localized in various languages -especially in emerging markets. It is like listening to somebody who has seen the future while still having the time to act on it.

Absolutely a great read and wish all the best.

-- Sunil Kulkarni
Entrepreneur
Fidel Technologies
Tokyo - Pune (India)
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent read. Concise, right to the point. Recommended., November 25, 2013
This review is from: Tiger Woman on Wall Street: Winning Business Strategies from Shanghai to New York and Back (Hardcover)
This book is really good. Not only does Junheng Li give a run down of how she invests, but she uses a sensible approach while investing. She examines how to analyze a company, its operations, its financial statements and various other important factors when making an investment decision. This book is an important one that I will recommend.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Winner Takes All ..., April 9, 2014
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This review is from: Tiger Woman on Wall Street: Winning Business Strategies from Shanghai to New York and Back (Hardcover)
Junheng Li weaves an acutely observed, unsentimental yet poignant narrative
of her journey growing up in the aftermath of China's Cultural Revolution, thriving
in its cutthroat educational regime, then graduating at the top of
her class at Middlebury College and decamping to Wall Street to ultimately
compete successfully with some of the world's leading hedge funds.

Along the way, you'll find yourself charmed by her return visit to Grandma
Yangyang, amused by her savvy observations on China's "Mistress Economy" and
its implications for the world's leading luxury marques and nodding your
head throughout at the woefully compromised labors of many denizens of Wall
Street agencies.

Knowledge is power and Ms. Li lays out her strategies to elicit "tells" from
CEOs and ferret out anomalies from obscure datasets you won't find anytime
soon on Bloomberg. If you seek alpha in emerging markets - or your own
backyard for that matter, Ms. Li's disciplined and relentless application of clever and
near-forensic analysis makes this a must read.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Richly Personal and Highly Informative Investment Insights, January 9, 2014
This is an amazing biography and personal story of how Junheng Li struggled through the setbacks of China's Cultural Revolution in the 60s, brought up under a strict father, fought through multiple challenges in her growing up years, came to America to study, to work, and subsequently to make a huge impact on the investment industry, especially in the area of providing deeper insights about American strategies and Chinese peculiarities in social, political, economic, and other tangible relationships. Richly personal and highly informative, Li (known in the book as Junh) shares her journey from China to America, and how she gleans the best of Chinese discipline and diligent, and the American way of freedom and democracy. Positioning herself as a Wall Street strategist and investment analyst with feet on both Western and Eastern awareness, Li aims to use her own story to help business people (especially from the West) to do business in China.

Li brings to us an up-front-and-personal view of Wall Street and its day to day dealings, as well as an insightful and shrewd take on Shanghai and the culture in China. She highlights her early years of how her family survived China's modern but cruel "Cultural Revolution." She shares the roots of her tenacity that was developed since young, like having to up her TOEFL scores from 480 to 600 in three months. She reveals how her questioning of the norm sharpens her acumen for short-selling opportunities. At the same time, she candidly writes about her boo-boos such as her dozing off when an important client was speaking as well as her failed marriage. Even her company, Aurarian, a small investment firm had to call it quits at the height of the 2009 financial crisis. Most fascinating of it all was her ability to understand the American mentality and ethical upbringing from a mainline Chinese point of view. She knows that there are many who are eager to invest in China. Yet, many of these investors are unable to understand the complexity of the Chinese markets. According to Li, the American model is one that assumes the market is "efficient" and many have unwittingly assumed that the Chinese market is similar. Li seeks to debunk this mistaken belief, arguing that when investing in China, it is critical for investors to know who and what they are investing in. By setting up her own firm (JL Warren), she has positioned herself as the expert in Sino-US investment analyses.

So What?
========
Reading through the various investment snippets gives me an opportunity to refresh my own knowledge about investment, like short selling and long positions; hedge funds and IPOs; company management and stock health; and others. Li writes in such a compelling and honest manner that readers can feel as if they are there with Li. The captivating stories make for a very educational as well as entertaining read. That said, I do have some reservations about some of the conclusions Li had made. First, I think Li may have tried to make things far too black and white, like claiming the Chinese's upbringing is more "shame-based" while the Western model is more "guilt-based"; or Chinese system as "knowledge based" compared to the American system of "idea based." My question is "To what extent is this true? What about those who grow up with mixed parenting?"

Perhaps, as a mainline Chinese working and living the American Dream, Li has that uncanny ability to discern the differences much more than others. However, with rising immigration and globalization, plus inter-marriages and the the merging of cultures, the investment climate is getting more grey and complex. Second, this book is Li's personal story about her journey in the investment angle. Readers need to be careful not to extrapolate too much into the other parts of society, such as politics, social norms, or other cultural idiosyncrasies. There are a lot of things that readers can adopt in terms of questioning the herd mentality and the lack of discernment when investing in an unknown firm. At the same time, it is good to remember that it is just one view. It is not the only view. In a complex environment, there is no one-size-fits-all methodology. Third, the success of any venture is not solely an individual matter. We need communities of discernment. Even Li herself admits seeking out advice from older and more experienced individuals such as her previous mentor, Jason, and business friends like Peter Winn. In a hard-hitting world of business amid a very unforgiving Wall Street attitude toward losses, we all need friends and to learn to see life not just from a money or profits point of view. Seeing that Li's reputation as a "Tiger Woman on Wall Street" has also come at a steep personal price, it is a reminder for me that life is not just about making money or breeding successful endeavours one after another. There will come a time in which the more important things in life will become more significant.

Toward the end of the book, Li becomes more reconciliatry in her outlook of both the American and the Chinese cultures. The "discipline and perseverance" she learned from her Chinese parents and the "integrity and curiosity" she adopted from her American way of life has made her more equipped to deal with both. Keen readers will realize that Li is advocating for change for both sides, for diligence from all, to work together and to flourish together.

I warmly recommend this book for anyone interested in investment, especially those keen to learn and understand more about investing in companies with a Chinese background. Great read!

Rating: 4.75 stars of 5.

conrade
This book is provided to me courtesy of McGraw-Hill Professional and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. All opinions offered above are mine unless otherwise stated or implied.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars book could have been more analytical, December 18, 2013
By 
RH "RH" (Los Angeles, CA) - See all my reviews
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The book is an extremely well written chronicle of the authors life from childhood to the present. She chronicles her childhood and educational upbringing in fascinating detail with the impact of being bought under a strict disciplinarian particularly disturbing.

Though she expounds on her discipline , hard work ethic and ability to overcome many obstacles the book drifts towards an empty rhetoric on the assessment of the financial risks on china. It is thin on details, empty on detailed assessments and rehashes details that is already been chronicled elsewhere in the news.

Other reviews hyped the book as a substantive read on the financial risks associated with china and the book is empty on that score. Would not recommend buying the book if you want to really understand how to assess the risks in china.however it is worth reading if you want to get an insight into life and growing up in contemporary china
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great book to understand the risks & culture of China, April 6, 2014
By 
I won't repeat all the other reviews. I follow China news frequently, and as an anti-corruption adviser (Iraq) & corporate internal audit manager, I tried to separate China hype from reality. I remember working for Nissan and trying to figure out how they operated profitably, deciding it was the government subsidies, and tricks like shifting accounting reports of earnings so all profits were reported in Japan before cars were shipped to the US at a loss.

I read this book completely in 3 days, took notes, and I am not an investor.

This book clarified my belief that China has no ethics, no religious culture to encourage honor and no cheating. They are the opposite culture of cheats, liars and immoral folks who subvert any ethics to focus on winning by each person without thought of how they do it. As Li says, don't county on China investment data being accurate, and only invest in the short term with detailed fact, not Goldman Sachs emotional pitches, to justify an investment.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars She knows China and the culture and risks, but seems a bit self serving to promote her investigative research business, March 9, 2014
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This review is from: Tiger Woman on Wall Street: Winning Business Strategies from Shanghai to New York and Back (Hardcover)
Was very readable and contained very valuable understanding of the differences in integrity and moral compass of the Chinese vs. Western business people. I am also a market researcher specializing in IVD in China (our 20th anniversary) and have a staff that we are very careful about selecting. I have also uncovered cases of outright fraud in companies that were the darlings of the investment world. (China Medical Technologies-NASDAQ CMED).
Overall, worthwhile to spend the time reading if you do business or invest in China.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A triumphal start in what will no doubt be a long literary career, bravo!, December 6, 2013
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This review is from: Tiger Woman on Wall Street: Winning Business Strategies from Shanghai to New York and Back (Hardcover)
As an equities investor myself, of course I found the clear and rational portrayal of what’s really going on with the Chinese economy to be both credible and encouraging for American and European Investors willing to “do their homework”, as the author insists we must in order to avoid becoming KFC-style “Shanghai Road-Kill” (Mr. Knuckle-hedgie notwithstanding). The points you made Junh, regarding peeling back the easy answers to look for real market and company intelligence ring just as true in Silicon Valley as they do in Guangzhou!

I may quibble with some of the technicalities you shared; e.g. IMHO, Apple China’s difficulties weren’t restricted to just the Central Chinese Government’s efforts, in fact the splintered communication & results spotty coordination between Apple HQ an Apple China, along with their way underestimation of Samsung’s prowess in the region certainly made them an easy target to rough-up upon iPhone launches.

Certainly the most compelling aspect of this book is clearly your own human tale; the roughshod Tiger Parenting from early childhood, the clash of realities between the severe conformity of the system you were raised in versus the untethered open-endedness of the American system you encountered at Middlebury, the exchange of marriage for financial success and realities of lost humanity in the process. All speaks to our own human struggles to make it and what we have to do to get there.

Frankly, I found myself wishing you’d spent just a tad more time on the personal-life-saga thread of the story during your skillful oratory on financial markets mechanisms and their Chinese postulates. There’s more to be written along those lines…one can hope that you’ve cleverly done this as a natural on-ramp to the next Tiger Woman book in the series, yes?

Best of luck in all your endeavors!
-Jason Cohen
Independent Investor
Los Angeles, CA
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Multi-Cultural Journey to Wall Street, November 29, 2013
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A fascinating multi-cultural journey from Shanghi to Wall Street. Well worth reading, for it covers several intertwined
stories showing the author's path to success, which required drive, judgement and intelligence.

Tom Gochberg, CEO
TGM Associates
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "Ditto" to the first 40 reviews, April 29, 2014
This review is from: Tiger Woman on Wall Street: Winning Business Strategies from Shanghai to New York and Back (Hardcover)
I recently had the pleasure of meeting the author as she gave a review of her book at a China Investment Group meeting in New York City. The book is well written and provides a historical insight into the author as well as gives the reader a good overview of doing business within China. I give the book a Five Star Rating and a must for anyone attempting to do business within China. Lawrence A. Freeman, Member, China Investment Group
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Tiger Woman on Wall Street: Winning Business Strategies from Shanghai to New York and Back
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