Til The Casket Drops

December 8, 2009 | Format: MP3

$9.99
Also available in CD Format
Song Title Artist
Time
Popularity  
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3:46
2
4:20
3
3:26
4
3:38
5
4:21
6
3:36
7
5:08
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3:21
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3:50
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3:17
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4:14
12
4:21
13
4:27


Product Details

  • Original Release Date: December 4, 2009
  • Release Date: December 4, 2009
  • Label: Columbia
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 51:45
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B002Y5D7JK
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (22 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #87,640 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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See all 22 customer reviews
The Clipse showed their undeniable talent on this album.
A. Carter
Sure they may be a few spots of weakness, but overall this is a very good album not a few good cuts.
B. Hines
Can't wait to hear what's next from these two or even the Trio w/ Ab Liva A.K.A. The Re-Up Gang.
MyZeRy3216

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Akash VINE VOICE on December 8, 2009
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
One of the enduring mysteries of music is how commercial success has eluded Clipse, a group that appeals to every demographic from hipsters to gangsters to suburban teen girls. After two (now three) acclaimed albums, four anthem-filled mixtapes and one staggeringly successful clothing line, Clipse are no longer waiting to be legitimized by the RIAA and have unapologetically assumed their roles as the "best duo ever." Alongside this swagger, Til The Casket Drops showcases a new repertoire that goes beyond the crack rap that has pigeonholed Clipse for so long and instead offers a deeper appreciation for life.

The confidence exuded on this album is exemplified by Pusha's parting words on the album's opening cut (Freedom), "I own you all." The journey through the rest of the record includes the catchy conceit of "Kinda Like a Big Deal" ("Lights, camera, action/ The chain itself's a dang distraction/We claim the belt/ The glory I bask in,") and the simple satisfaction of "I'm Good" ("I'm lookin' good, and I'm feelin' good/ Try and stop my shine/ I wish a brotha would.") On "Doorman" Clipse rap "Big charms, hanging from my big chain/ Swinging side to side, feelin' like I'm T-Pain." While on "Champion" they offer, "Overcame the odds/ So we overdo them cars/ We done balled around the world/ Now we reaching for them stars." The lyrical skill that gave them the swagger in the first place is intact and in full effect.

Til the Casket Drops is also defined by a maturation in mindset that moves beyond the girls, cash, cars mantra of some of the singles. The deep-album cuts offer poignant, insightful rhymes that reveal a duo who've had their fill of materialism and are seeking something more meaningful.
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21 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Rudolph Klapper on December 8, 2009
Format: Audio CD
For Virginia Beach rap duo Clipse, what more fitting time to release their third album than when the weather starts to turn white? Brothers Malice and Pusha T have long made their name on critically-acclaimed, popularly-ignored hardcore rap that largely focused on one thing and one thing only: cocaine, and all the business ventures and death threats that go along with it. From their brutal lyrics, relentless flow, and minimalist Neptunes-provided beats, they've always seemed darker than their contemporaries, more real and, most importantly, more believable. But after yet another long layoff and another sub-standard mixtape to whet their fans' appetites, Clipse have found themselves in a weird place: successful, and with nothing to prove.

Perhaps then they can be forgiven for making their first so-so record, one that on the surface seems to have all the necessary ingredients for another celebrated release. The brothers Thornton have retained their sharp tongues and smooth but distinctive flows, rapping out lyrics like "I keep that dirty money / I'm talkin' fast cash / I'm talkin' razor shaving / I'm talkin' duffle bags" with the same equal amounts of nonchalance and subtle vigor that they use to spit lines like "hell, even my garage a ménage / like my hoes exotic, same as my cars" or "they think it's cute / while they're giving me dome" so viciously. They're still obsessed with coke, although here they focus more on the money and fame it's brought them than the actual travails of drug dealing. And the Neptunes are still on board, providing low-key beats with the focus on the brothers' storytelling.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A. Carter on January 27, 2010
Format: MP3 Music Verified Purchase
The Clipse showed their undeniable talent on this album. I respect Malice for revealing what his real life is like and stating although he raps about certain things in his music his life is totally different from that. First artist I've heard admit that.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on January 13, 2010
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
"I thought life was a bad girl, bad car/ Life is with your kids, watchin' Madagascar."
"Life Change," Malice rhymes "Now I see clearly with a family of four/ Never did I deserve a two-seater Porchse,"
"Wasted so much time stuntin' for folks/ When really the whole time I was stuntin' my growth." On "Footsteps,"
"These footsteps could lead you astray/ Lead you to the cell, or lead you to a grave...Don't let my wrongs give you the right of way."
This album represents why hip-hop/rap will continue to be relevant, because of artists like the Clipse who stay true to what rap is about. It's not just about materialism, crime, drugs and sex. These quotes represent what main stream media doesn't want the masses to know about some of our prominent hip-hop artist-they're thoughtful, introspective, intelligent and creative. They would rather pigeon-hole the entire hip-hip community as ignorant, frivolous and violent individuals. We help them by saying there is no redeeming quality about this album- "it's average"-do those quotes sound average? When did a positive message become "average"? The Clipse give you the good and the bad of their life with excellent lyrical skills. This album is top 2/3 Clipse albums(hell hath...is 3rd), giving you tangible examples of hope and redemption over some tight beats!
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