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Time to Care: Personal Medicine in the Age of Technology Paperback – December 1, 2009

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Editorial Reviews

Review

Time to Care is a must read as the nation struggles with healthcare reform. Dr. Makous' patient-doctor relationship focus could lead to higher quality care, reduced costs and much more satisfaction for both patients and doctors. His research, combined with fascinating personal experiences, makes this a lively read.”  —Joseph P. Sullivan, chairman of the board of advisors, RAND Health



“Young healthcare professionals will gain a sharp perspective on how the modern medical system came to be while always being cautioned not to let technological and operational advances impede the primary cornerstone of medicine the physician-patient relationship.”  —Oliver C. Bullock, D.O., professor of family medicine and division chair of community medicine, Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine



In Time to Care, Dr. Makous shows that, during a period when everybody else seemed determined to snitch a piece of the health insurance money pie, the patient wanted one major thing from the doctor. He wanted to be helped through his illness. The patients loved their doctor, in what was known as the patient-doctor relationship. But a strange thing was also true. The doctors loved their patients, the only group in society who seemed to care what the doctor was trying to do.”  —George Ross Fisher III, MD, author, The Hospital That Ate Chicago

About the Author

Norman Makous practiced medicine for 60 years through a private practice in Kansas City and then Philadelphia. He has held appointments on the faculties of both the University of Pennsylvania Medical School and Thomas Jefferson Medical University, as well as on the boards of several government and health insurance advisory groups. He lives in Coatesville, Pennsylvania. Bruce Makous is a health-care fund-raiser and author of Riding the Brand and Virtually Dead. He lives in Philadelphia.

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 440 pages
  • Publisher: TowPath Publications (December 1, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0977668614
  • ISBN-13: 978-0977668618
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 1.1 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,871,151 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Due to millions of dollars being spent on unnecessary tests and incorrect treatments, technology- based healthcare in the United States has caused an economic squeeze that already has led to rationing of medical care and services. Here Makous, a noted, now retired, extensively trained and credentialed, primary care cardiologist, who practiced in Philadelphia, PA until 2000 (M.D., University of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison, WI, 1947; American Board of Medical Specialties Certification, Internal Medicine, 1957; Subspecialty Certification, Cardiovascular Disease, 1961; faculty of The University of Pennsylvania Medical School, 1959-1995, and Thomas Jefferson Medical University, 1994; formerly, Regional President, American Heart Association; Distinguished Achievement Award, American Heart Association of Pennsylvania; author of The Road Taken (2006); [...]), with the enthusiastic, thematic and directional support of his son Bruce, a leading healthcare fundraiser and published author (Riding the Brand (2004) and Virtually Dead (2006); [...]), proposes that the patient-doctor relationship that was displaced by technology be returned to its central, fundamental position in the delivery of medical care and services in order to humanize treatment, improve the quality of care, reduce unnecessary spending and ineffective practices, increase doctor-patient satisfaction, and result in a happier and healthier society.Read more ›
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 25, 2009
Format: Paperback
As a younger physician, I enjoy stories of the bygone days of medicine, when physicians were held in high esteem and enjoyed autonomy, while providing ethical compassionate care.

This book was a delightful read, full of interesting anecdotes of medical cases, but written in an accessible way without using medical jargon. The reader gets the sense of the person with the disease, his world and perceptions, so the patient's behavior and choices make sense.

I would recommend this book to anyone who wants to know what medical care can be without pressures from the insurance companies and the threat of litigation.

Reading this book is like sitting across the table from a seasoned, kind and compassionate doctor, and hearing him tell stories about his life and work.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By R.J.K. Kendle on December 13, 2009
Format: Paperback
Dr. Norman Makous hits the nail square on the head with this book: Time To Care-Personal Medicine In the Age Of Technology. Dr. Makous realizes the virtue in personal patient-doctor relationship and the health benefits that go along with it.
With the increasing impersonal and vast HMOs a patient may never see the same doctor twice. With this in mind it becomes increasingly difficult to find trust and rapport and thereby personal knowledge that may aid the Dr. in diagnoses and treatment. A Time To Care offers ideas and strategies to overcome the impersonal clinic and advance the personal touch. Love this book. Highly recommend it.
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