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Time Flies (Caldecott Honor Book) Hardcover – March 1, 1994


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 3 - 7 years
  • Grade Level: Preschool - 2
  • Series: Caldecott Honor Book
  • Hardcover: 32 pages
  • Publisher: Crown Books for Young Readers; Reissue edition (March 1, 1994)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0521829984
  • ISBN-13: 978-1857582727
  • ASIN: 0517595982
  • Product Dimensions: 10.2 x 0.4 x 11.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #656,403 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Is it a bird? Is it a plane? Yes, no--it's a metaphor! Rohmann's wordless first book shows a bird flying into a dinosaur museum one dark and stormy night. The bird flits about, perching on a dinosaur jaw and soaring on. As it flies past one particular behemoth, the bones of the creature are suddenly cloaked in flesh; the bird has entered a prehistoric landscape. A dinosaur eventually swallows the bird, but as it wings its way down the creature's throat and through its digestive system, the would-be predator is transformed to a skeleton and the bird returns once again to the museum hall. The meaning of this exercise is unclear, although a jacket note explains that Rohmann was "inspired by the theory that birds are the modern relatives of the dinosaurs." The target audience will likely be mystified. Slightly older readers, however, might be intrigued by the time-travel conceit and the scientifically minded will be wowed by Rohmann's oil paintings, which capture the textures of bone, tooth, eyeball, etc., with as much attentiveness and morbidity as, say, an 18th-century still life of gamebirds. Ages 4-9.
Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From School Library Journal

PreSchool-Grade 3-In this wordless journey back in time, a bird flies into a museum filled with dinosaur skeletons. The walls dissolve and the skeletons take on flesh, coming to life. In a dramatic picture, the bird is eaten by what appears to be a Tyrannosaurus Rex. But the dinosaur's flesh fades away, as gradually and mysteriously as it had first appeared, and the bird flies free, easily escaping from what is again nothing but bones. The columns of the museum's grand hall reappear, and the bird flies off into the sky, watched by a pterodactyl gargoyle. This impressive effort is rather like David Wiesner's Tuesday (Clarion, 1991), sharing its elements of technical expertise and surreal fantasy. Rohmann's oil paintings (all double-page spreads) show the inside of the museum in warm, burnished browns and reds, while the colors are cooler and more varied in the outdoor light of the prehistoric scenes. Unusual perspectives and striking compositions and images make for a dynamic and intriguing book. The picture of the bird balanced on the teeth of the skeleton is a remarkable juxtaposition of delicacy and strength. This title has potential for classroom use- when studying paleontology or evolution, preparing for a field trip, or doing creative writing projects. All in all, a title that children will love.
Lauralyn Persson, Wilmette Public Library, IL
Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
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4 star
33%
3 star
8%
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See all 12 customer reviews
If your kids love dinos, they will enjoy it.
Stephanie Keyes
The detailed illustrations in this wordless picture book carry the story very well... words would have cluttered the adventure of this story.
Kaitlin M. Vanderlinden
This book should be in every classroom library!
"valleyblossom"

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By "valleyblossom" on January 14, 2001
Format: Paperback
I often use this beautifully illustrated book in my classroom of 3-5 year olds. As the children view the pictures they begin talking about what they see happening without any facillitation from me. This is an excellent book to use in the classroom to promote language! Everytime we read it our plot changes a little bit! This book should be in every classroom library!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By E. R. Bird HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on January 12, 2006
Format: Hardcover
I wonder what the process is behind author/illustrators of picture books making their very first wordless title. Is it something they all secretly want to do but only a few dare to? Does everyone make one and then publishers get scared and refuse to publish them? Why are there only a few on the market today? Obviously when Eric Rohmann's, "Time Flies" won the Caldecott Honor it probably raised the status of wordless picture books everywhere. I'm not suggesting that it was the first book of its kind or even the best but since its publication we've enjoyed other wordless titles like fellow Honor, "The Red Book" by Barbara Lehman and "The Boy, the Bear, the Baron, and the Bard" by Gregory Rogers. Eric Rohmann would later go on to garner the full Caldecott Award for, "My Friend Rabbit", a book done in a style entirely different from that of most of his work. By and large Rohmann feels more comfortable with gentle surrealism as in, "Cinder-Eyed Cats" and "Clara and Asha", though he's not afraid to go off and make a "Pumpkinhead" for the heck of it. In "Time Flies" we are taken on a wordless trip back and forth through time with a creature that may well be visiting his own ancestors.

On a dark and stormy orange-skied night, a small bird flies into a natural history museum of some sort. As the bird glides, perches, and looks about the hall full of bones, things begin to change around it. A bolt of lightning lights up the scene and before you know it the bird has been sent back in time to when dinosaurs weren't macabre displays but living breathing creatures. The bird flaps about brontosaurus, flies just in front of pterodactyls, and finally (in a surprise move on Rohmann's part) is snapped up by the T-Rex. Don't fret for the birdy, though.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Gail Cooke HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on April 3, 2004
Format: Hardcover
Eric Rohmann has made numrous contributions to the annals of children's literature since his estimable debut "Time Flies." I think often of and return to "The Cinder-Eyed Cat" for pure enjoyment.
However, "Time Flies" was the beginning - when our eyes were first arrested by the boldness of his vision as he took readers on an imaginary journey to prehistoric times.
As exciting today as it was when first published "Time flies" would be a most welcome gift for any child.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By S. White on September 9, 2008
Format: Paperback
Time Flies is a wordless picturebook. In the story, a little bird is flying through the dinosaur bones in a museum when the dinosaurs suddenly come to life, covered in skin and looking for lunch! In the end, the dinosaurs are changing back to bones and the little bird flies off to safety.

This book was difficult for me. I had to really examine the pages to be able to tell the story...but maybe that is the point of a wordless picture book. My own disinterest in dinosaurs probably contributed as well, but I need to try to balance that with the fact that my students and my daughters are very interested in dinosaur books. Reader's response drives me to continue exploring the topic in order to reach children.

In the classroom, I might show children photos of the dinosaur exhibits at a museum or actually take a trip to the museum. In addition, supplimenting this book with a variety of informational books about dinosaurs would be interesting. It could even be used as a transition into the human body and our own skeletal system.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Haley Hines on March 7, 2000
Format: Paperback
In this magical wordless picture book, Rohmann does a great job of setting the scene in a history museum. When a bird flies through the area with the dinosaur skeletons, The area suddenly comes to life. The walls become trees and beautiful landscapes. The bird is swallowed by one of the now living dinosaurs and as he escapes Rohmann takes us back to reality of the dinosaur skeletons and fossils. The pictures are amazing! I can see why he won the Caldecott award.
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Format: Paperback
If you are fortunate enough to have a child, grandchild or know of a child (or adult for that matter), who has that creative spark, that is touched with that difficult to define imagination which is becoming so rare, and is blessed with the ability to soar beyond the everyday mundane realities of life, then this is a perfect book to present them. Eric Rohmann more or less was one of the founding fathers of the wordless books for the young. No, he was not the first, but he certainly influenced many wonderful works of this ilk and gave a strong tone of respectability to the genre.

A bird, a rather marvelous bird flies into a museum where it encounters a hall devoted to the skeletal remains of dinosaurs, all displayed in somber colors. Our little bird embarks upon a journey of imagination and speculation via the wonderful art work of the author. The bird travels trough times, back through time to the beginnings of his or her species. Gradually the skeletons gain flesh and life and the little bird travels through time to the age of these magnificent beasts.

The reader must watch closely as they leaf through this book...watch for the wonderful and imaginative details! Gradually we see, mixed with these extinct creatures, remnants of lost and vanished civilizations which conjure up visions of a lost Atlantis, overgrown with the forefathers of forefathers of our trees and plants.

The details of this work are rather amazing. The dark and brooding colors contracted with the constant movement and flashes of brightness have almost a hypnotic effect. I have watch otherwise hyperactive kids be totally engrossed and silent while reading (or I should say gazing) at this work. You can actually see their minds wonder and speculate...their imaginations are captured!
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More About the Author

Eric Rohmann was born in Riverside, Illinois in 1957. He grew up in Downers Grove, a suburb of Chicago. As a boy, Eric played Little League baseball, read comic books, collected rocks and minerals, insects, leaves, and animal skulls.

Eric has his BS in Art and an MS in Studio Art from Illinois State University, and an MFA in Printmaking/Fine Bookmaking from Arizona State University. He also studied Anthropology and Biology. Eric taught printmaking, painting, and fine bookmaking at Belvoir Terrace in Massachusettes and introductory drawing, fine bookmaking, and printmaking at St. Olaf College in Minnesota.

Eric has created book jackets for a number of novels, including His Dark Materials, by Philip Pullman. He won a Caldecott Honor Book award for Time Flies, and a Caldecott Medal award for My Friend Rabbit. Eric has written four children's books: My Friend Rabbit, The Cinder-Eyed Cats, Pumpkinhead, and A Kitten's Tale. He recently illustrated Lois Lowry's Bless This Mouse and an old Scottish poem, Last Song. Look for Bone Dog out in the latter part of 2011.

Eric currently resides in a suburb of Chicago.

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