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A Time For Courage: The Suffragette Diary of Kathleen Bowen, Washington, D.C. 1917 (Dear America Series) Hardcover – March 1, 2002


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 9 - 12 years
  • Lexile Measure: 850L (What's this?)
  • Hardcover: 222 pages
  • Publisher: Scholastic Inc.; First Edition edition (March 1, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0590511416
  • ISBN-13: 978-0590511414
  • Product Dimensions: 7.4 x 4.7 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (24 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #254,767 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Grade 4-6-Kat Bowen records her days in Washington, DC, in a diary from her mother. A typical 13-year-old from a well-to-do family, she expresses her dreams and hopes as she recounts her thoughts on school, homework, relationships, parties, and her special bond with her cousin Alma. As the early days of 1917 pass, Kat becomes increasingly aware of the political issues that are prevalent, particularly the inevitable involvement of the U.S. in World War I and women's suffrage. Her physician father is quietly supportive of his wife's activism in the movement, while his brother-in-law, Alma's father, demeans it and forbids the women in his family to participate in any way. Kat soon joins her mother sewing banners and bringing hot bricks for warmth on the picket line. Lasky entwines some of the real characters of the day with her fictional figures. She gives a good overview of the harsh treatment these women endured during their picketing and imprisonment and touches on divorce, the plight of African-American citizens in the South, and President Wilson's disinterest in rights for women. Kat is well developed into a young woman whose exposure to the politics and consequences allow her to mature and decide what true liberty and justice for all really means. A historical note and reproductions of photos are appended.
Rita Soltan, Baldwin Public Library, Birmingham, MI
Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

More About the Author

Hi Readers! Thanks for coming by my author page. I've written all sorts of books - from fantasy about animals to books about science. One of my favorite animal fantasy series, Guardians of Ga'Hoole, is a major motion picture. I liked writing about Ga'Hoole so much that I decided to revisit that world in a different series, Wolves of the Beyond. I've recently added a new Guardians book: The Rise of A Legend, the story of Ezylryb, the great sage of the Ga'Hoole Tree. Another new book just came out, the first in the Horses of the Dawn series. I think of it as an equine retelling of the Spanish conquest of the New World. Visit my website, www.kathrynlasky.com for the latest news. All my best, Kathryn

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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See all 24 customer reviews
I highly recommend this book to all fans of the Dear America series.
Rebecca Herman
I highly recommend reading it for a good historical novel, either on your own or with a girl whose age ranges from upper elementary through high school.
Tyrean
The historical accuracy of this book is mainly what made the story so interesting to me.
"greengoldfairy"

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By hiphopgirl_1000 on February 15, 2002
Format: Hardcover
As War rages on in Europe in 1917 Kathleen "Cat" Bowen knows there is another big fight to finish at home. Her mother, sister, aunt, and many other women around her have all become suffragists to the disapproval of many men including Cat's uncle and her father. Cat and her cousin Alma want to join the picket lines but they are too young. The excitement builds as the picket lines have lasted more than a week and it seems there might be hope in the horizon! News reaches far out of the picket lines in Washington D.C. and many women from all over the United States have come to participate in the fight for the right to vote. On the homefront as the United States gets ready for war Cat sees the changes at home too as women take a much more active role in the society such as her cousin Alma who helps with the Red Cross over in Europe after running away from home and her problems . However Cat suffers a blow with the unexpected arrest of her mother. Can Cat survive more things to come?
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Rebecca Herman HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on February 15, 2002
Format: Hardcover
It's 1917 in Washington, D.C, and as the Great War rages in Europe, thirteen-year-old Kathleen Bowen is caught up in a fight closer to home. Her mother, sister Nell, and Auntie Claire are suffragists, fighting for voting rights for women, to the disapproval of her Uncle Bayard and the worry of her father. Kat and her cousin Alma, who are the exact same age, want to help, but they are too young to join the picket line. As it begins to seem more and more likely that the United States will enter the war, life begins to change in other ways. Nell leaves to join the Women's Ambulance Corps in France, and Alma, desperate to escape after her parents' bitter divorce, runs away to England and becomes a Red Cross volunteer. But the worst hardship of all is still to come. Kat's mother is arrested, and Kat wonders how she will ever make it through this unbearable loneliness. I highly recommend this book to all fans of the Dear America series.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on October 8, 2005
Format: Hardcover
A Time for Courage by Kathryn Lasky is one of my all-time favorite books in the Dear America historical fiction series. It is not particularly my favorite era of American history, but it is so well-written and interesting you just fall right in.

Kathleen Bowen's mother, aunt, older sister, and best friend's mother are all deeply involved in women's suffrage and equality rights, living in Washington D.C., 1917. Kathleen's father does not approve only because he worries for his wife's safety---many women have been arrested and beaten by police for protesting outside the White House. Yet Kathleen's friend's father disapproves of his wife's antics because he is a bit of a sexist. Soon, Kathleen becomes involved with the rights of women everywhere, just like her sisters and mother.

This timeless addition in Dear America will please all, and I promise you shall not be able to put it down. All the protagonists are extremely likable, and this book is just indescribably great. I just can't put it to words. READ IT!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 24, 2002
Format: Hardcover
Set in Washington, D.C.,1917. 13-year-old Kathleen Bowen revels in her diary her hopes, dreams, fears, and her suffering. Her mother has become a active member in the suffrage, and pickettes everyday. Her sisters have joined the Red Cross and have left her alone, Her cousin and only best friend Alma, leaves after her parents get a divorce. Her father spend more time in his office than at home. Alone and sad, she faces the world alone. Her only friend and the person she can confide in is her diary. Just when she thinks things cannot get worse, they do. Her mother is put in jail. Kat must find all her courage and streght to face what is to come. I highly recommed this diary for any Dear America fan or any one that enjoys historical fiction.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Andromeda on August 31, 2007
Format: Library Binding
Kat Bowen is living in Washington D.C. during the woman's fight for the vote. Her own mother is among the woman picketing outside the White House Kat writes down her own views and opinions during this time. She supports her mother but at the same time worries about her mother. Especially after Kat sees how women picketing are being treated. She also witnesses trouble in her family when her uncle is so against the picketing and noting of women voting to the point it almost ruins the marriage of her aunt and uncle. Its amazing how badly picketers were treated and at the same time the women who did picket and go through the hunger strikes and horrible time in jail they were all so brave. An excellent book.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By "greengoldfairy" on November 20, 2002
Format: Hardcover
This is not a half bad addition to the ever growing Dear America Series. I just don't think that it it the best out there. Kat's story is pretty interesting though, and I actually learned a lot of things from reading her "diary."
Over the course of a year, Kat's diary is a window into the happenings of the suffragette movement in Washington, D.C., of which Kat's mother is a part of. At first, Kat is pleased to have so many "exciting" things taking place right in her own neighborhood. Eventually though, she begins to feel left behind when her mother becomes more and more dedicated to the suffragette movement, her sister Nell gets swept away by her own plans, and, perhaps most of all, when Kat's best friend Alma is taken away.
The historical accuracy of this book is mainly what made the story so interesting to me. If I had ever read about the way women suffragettes were treated, I'd forgotten all but the basics, and was really interested by the things that happen. Kat's voice is clear, but her story seems a little flat, bolstered a great deal by the story of the suffragettes.
If you've liked other books in the Dear America series, or are interested in getting a better picture of the struggle that went on before women were allowed the right to vote, you'll definitely like this book, as I did. I just didn't feel that it was quite as good as some of the other Dear America books that I have read in the past.
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