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As Time Goes By: From the Industrial Revolutions to the Information Revolution Paperback – May 16, 2002

3 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0199251056 ISBN-10: 0199251053

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Editorial Reviews

Review

`Review from previous edition This major contribution to economic history is the most impressive and convincing attempt I know to apply the concept of the 'long waves', a basic rhythm of historical development in the era of capitalism, to the entire stretch from eighteenth-century Lancashire to twenty-first-century Silicon Valley. It is also a call for economic history to escape from the handcuffs of narrow retrospective econometrics to the freedom of its vocation: understanding and explaining secular historical transformations.' Eric Hobsbawm FBA, American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Emeritus Professor of Social and Economic History, Birkbeck College; Author of The Age of Extremes: The Short Twentieth Century 1914-1991

`. . . a true story has to make sense, to be plausible and persuasive. Cleverness is less useful than sense and sensibility. The inability to see this, to avoid showing off, has been the death of more than one pyrotechnic schema. This book is testimony to knowledge and good sense. Such virtues are rare and that much more valuable.' David Landes, Professor of History and Economics, Harvard University, Emeritus; Author of The Wealth and Poverty of Nations

`This book is a thought-provoking work that is valuable for more than its detailed account of the technological revolutions that shape our economy today. By directing our attention to a perspective outside the current wave, it shapes our thinking about events inside the current wave.' Academy of Management Review, 27(2)

About the Author


Chris Freeman is Emeritus Professor at SPRU, University of Sussex. After studying at the London School of Economics, he later took up the position of Research Fellow at the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, London (1959-66) before becoming Director of the Science Policy Research Unit at the University of Susex (1966-81). His most recent position was Visiting Professor at the University of Limburg in Maastricht (1986-96). He is the author of numerous books including 'The Economics of Industrial Innovation' (with L. Soete, Pinter, 1997); 'Work for All or Mass Unemployment: Computerised Technical Change into the 21st Century' (with L. Soete, Pinter, 1994); and 'Technology and Economic Performance: Lessons from Japan' (Pinter, 1987). Francisco Louçã is Professor of Economics in the Faculty of Economics and Management at the ISEG, Lisbon. He obtained his Ph.D. in Economics at the University of Lisbon under the supervision of Chris Freeman, subsequently publishing his thesis in both English and Portuguese ('Turbulence in Economics', Edward Elgar 1997). In 1999 he was elected Member of Parliament in Portugal, and serves in the Economic and Budgetary Commission.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 432 pages
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press (May 16, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0199251053
  • ISBN-13: 978-0199251056
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 0.9 x 6.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,455,776 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Leopold Boeckl on January 18, 2007
Format: Paperback
Well written, exceptionally easy to understand and more importantly not just another vacuous theory book. It is applied modeling, which is what makes the book a very engaging read. One of my top two Kondratiev wave picks.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By R. Albin TOP 1000 REVIEWER on November 12, 2011
Format: Paperback
This book is divided into 2 parts. Part 1 is essentially a moderately interesting long essay of intellectual history looking at attempts to characterize "long waves" of capitalist economic development. Part 2 is a very interesting piece of broad economic history and analysis covering economic history since the first industrial revolution and presenting a broad model of economic progress.

Part 1 is fairly polemical in nature. A good deal of this portion is devoted to the inability of conventional equilibrium economics, econometric analysis, and economic history to account for broad changes in economic history. This critique is accompanied by discussion of prior thinkers, including individuals like Schumpeter and Kondratiev, who attempted to account for longer term trends. The critique of conventional economics and economic history is probably the best part of this section. Some of this part has the flavor of attempting to develop some intellectual legitimacy for the authors' position by citing a set of distinguished intellectual ancestors. If your primary interest is economic history, skip this part.

Part 2 is a really interesting combination of economic and technological history. Drawing on their own prior work and the work of other scholars, notably Carlota Perez, they present a relatively stereotyped model of serial technological and economic change that at least contributes to long term fluctuations in the world economy. The development and spread of new technologies is the driver of economic growth on longer time scales. A key set of technological innovations provoke considerable economic growth, often transforming multiple sectors of the economy.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Paul Moreno on May 4, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is one of the few good modern books I've read that examines the history of technology as it relates to economics and particularly to the Kondratieff cycle.

The first part of the book covering the economic background of cycle research and other topics is written to the PhD economist; however, the balance of the book does a good job of presenting the history of technology as it relates to the economy. The Kondratieff cycles are discussed in terms of techlologies: Canals, steam engines, railways, iron and steel, electrification, automoiles and petroleum, plastics and computers, etc., with various tables of economic statistics illustrating impacts of these technologies.

The book is well researched with very good referencing.
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As Time Goes By: From the Industrial Revolutions to the Information Revolution
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