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Time Must Have a Stop (British Literature) Paperback – July 17, 1998


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Product Details

  • Series: British Literature
  • Paperback: 280 pages
  • Publisher: Dalkey Archive Press; 3rd edition (July 17, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1564781801
  • ISBN-13: 978-1564781802
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 5.6 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #648,036 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Time Must Have a Stop exhibits Mr. Huxley's learning, his gift for limericks, an acute sense of the craft of poetry and a genuine power of modern poetic phrase, a flow of ribald expression and more than a feast of dark and desperate conclusions about sex." --Times Literary Supplement

"This is Mr. Huxley's best novel for a very long time. . . . admirably constructed . . . bright and sun-pierced." --New Statesman and Nation

"Extraordinary erudition, nasty wit, nihilism . . . a prime performance." --Kirkus

About the Author

Aldous Huxley is one of the most significant British writers of the twentieth century. He wrote a dozen novels, including Point Counter Point, Those Barren Leaves, and Brave New World, and twice as many volumes of poetry and nonfiction.

More About the Author

Aldous Huxley (1894-1963) is the author of the classic novels Island, Eyeless in Gaza, and The Genius and the Goddess, as well as such critically acclaimed nonfiction works as The Devils of Loudun, The Doors of Perception, and The Perennial Philosophy. Born in Surrey, England, and educated at Oxford, he died in Los Angeles.

Customer Reviews

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The characters add further insight with their behaviors.
T. Brooks
If I may be so bold, Huxley chooses God, and so do I. Huxley describes the infinite perrenial God in many of his writings as mysticisim.
Jennifer
Spiritualism, a great enthusiasm of the period, also figures in Huxley's narrative.
Patto

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

18 of 18 people found the following review helpful By T. Brooks on July 9, 2005
Format: Paperback
This book is not for everyone. If you like and understand satirical views of Victorian society and you have a knowledge or interest in art, poetry, and theology then you'll find this book intellectually stimulating. If you don't appreciate any of these things you might find it presumptuous and at the very least boring. So I admit this book is very much intoned to a specific audience.

The book delves into discussions of just about everything under the sun. It goes through saintliness, theology, art, poetry, schooling, etiquette, and morals. The characters add further insight with their behaviors. I was particularly fond of Mrs. Thwale who perfectly embodies the female mystique and femme fatale. A lascivious woman of Victorian sensibilities and honor she flits from one man to the next, never giving herself up. The main character, probably the least well-rounded, seems to be a flawless embodiment of the stereotypical teenager who thinks he's the center of the universe.

Certain points are just terribly cruel but absolutely hilarious in that twisted satirical way. At one point the elderly Queen Mother clutches her dead dog in mourning but almost as soon as a new puppy is handed over to her she lets the dog fall off her lap and flop to the ground. I believe there is a point to be made here.

Though I admit I don't even remotely agree with the discussions of sainthood I did find it an interesting read. It proved Huxley is evermore a very complicated and perhaps conflicted character in and of himself. Though I give this book five stars I still think it bears repeating it's not for everyone.
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23 of 29 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 14, 1999
Format: Paperback
Huxley was a man of many bizarre ideas as well as an uneven writer, but he could also be quite a deep and compelling thinker. This book is a particularly vivid example of this contradiction. I found parts of the novel almost painfully bad (one of the characters trying to communicate from the afterlife through an incompetent medium, or the epilogue that in effect abandons any pretense of being part of novel in order to become an unconfortable mix of essay and sermon). There is also the lingering problem of Huxley's uninformed and unfair attitude towards natural science. But in exchange for accepting these failures the reader gets two extraordinary character portraits: one of a monster (Mrs. Thwale) and one of a saint (Bruno the bookseller), both very convincing and immensely insightful. Add to that a penetrating study of the perils of self-absorption, a sound case for moral restraint, and the best diagnosis I have come across of why artists who express the most sublime insight about human nature can still behave like swine. It's sad and doubly ironic the Huxley himself should have been an impeachable character. Anyway, quite a worthwhile read.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 20, 1998
Format: Hardcover
Huxley explores the fickleness of mortality with his usual clever pen and knack for irony. This beautiful book examines materialism and morality through the eyes of a young man and contrasts this with the protagonist's reflections of years later.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Patto TOP 500 REVIEWER on November 21, 2009
Format: Paperback
As pointed out in the lively preface, this is a novel of ideas, a novel of manners, a critique of human history and a voyage into the realm of the unknown. Because it attempts so much, it's not perfect. But when it's good, it dazzles.

The hero is 17-year-old Sebastian Barack who looks like a Della Robbia angel and writes mythological poetry. His mother died young and his father is utterly absorbed in idealistic political causes. The father's refusal to buy Sebastian decent evening clothes for a party leads the young man into one moral dilemma after another.

Another central character is Sebastian's rich, self-indulgent, affable and effete Uncle Eustace, whose conversation is a fountain of wit. The chapters where Eustace appears are pure reading pleasure. And when he dies, his experiences as a disembodied spirit in the void are equally engaging. This tour de force has been compared to the descriptions of the afterlife in The Tibetan Book of the Dead.

Sebastian's other important influence is a saintly bookseller who helps him approach "the divine Ground of all being."

Written during World War II and published in 1944, the book is a fascinating window into English society in the `20s.

Spiritualism, a great enthusiasm of the period, also figures in Huxley's narrative. For some interesting background on the short-lived Society for Psychical Research, I'd suggest reading Ghost Hunters by Deborah Blum. It helped me appreciate the séance scene in Time Must Have a Stop.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Stephen Hand on October 5, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
It is sometimes forgotten that the author of Brave New World, Brave New World Revisited, The Perennial Philosophy and Doors of Perception continued writing fiction long after Brave New World. Huxley believed this was one of his best novels and I believe he was right. The book is arresting from the beginning when a young lad with a poetic temperament finds himself locked in a struggle between a callous Socialist father, for whom politics is everything and yet refuses to so much as get his son the dinner jacket that he needs so badly, and another more spiritual man who guides and reminds the boy that man does not live by politics alone.

Huxley was a fascinating character and man of many contradictions. Having just about finished Nicholas Murray's biography of him, I was almost amused to see how Huxley, while rejecting the miracles of Jesus Christ on allegedly empirical grounds, was nevertheless not only an connoisseur of psychadelic drugs, but also a frequenter of seances, Fourth Dimensions, and all sorts of other occult phenomena right up until his LSD-tripped-out death in 1963. Huxley was also a eugenicist, a friend and admirer of the devil worshiper Alister Crowley (also known as both Frater Perdurabo and The Great Beast, who called his 'Black Mysticism' Diabolatry and Diabolism in his book Magic in Theory in Practice). Huxley also took to 'Dianetics' founder L. Ron Hubbard of "Church of Scientology" fame and many (and I mean many!) other sordid or faddish types.

All of this seemed in stark contrast not only to reason (ghosts, yes! Resurrection, no!
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