Industrial-Sized Deals TextBTS15 Shop Women's Fall Denim Learn more nav_sap_SWP_6M_fly_beacon Night Beds The Next Storm Fire TV Stick Subscribe & Save Find the Best Purina Pro Plan for Your Pet Shop Popular Services Home Theater Setup Plumbing Services Assembly Services Shop all furious7 furious7 furious7  Amazon Echo Fire HD 6 Kindle Voyage Assassin's Creed Syndicate Shop Now Deal of the Day
Time Reborn and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 10 left in stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Time Reborn: From the Cri... has been added to your Cart
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: qualifies for free prime shipping! may contain some light wear from use. 100% satisfaction guaranteed!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Time Reborn: From the Crisis in Physics to the Future of the Universe Hardcover – April 23, 2013

134 customer reviews

See all 13 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$28.00
$1.94 $1.33

Save up to 40% on professional, scholarly and scientific resources.
Wiley's Summer Savings Event
Save up to 40% on professional, scholarly and scientific resources. Learn more.
$28.00 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Only 10 left in stock. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Time Reborn: From the Crisis in Physics to the Future of the Universe + The Trouble With Physics: The Rise of String Theory, The Fall of a Science, and What Comes Next
Price for both: $41.17

Buy the selected items together

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

*Starred Review* Was Einstein wrong? At least in his understanding of time, Smolin argues, the great theorist of relativity was dead wrong. What is worse, by firmly enshrining his error in scientific orthodoxy, Einstein trapped his successors in insoluble dilemmas as they try to devise timeless laws explaining the origins and structure of the cosmos. How, Smolin asks, can such laws account for the highly improbable set of conditions that triggered the big bang jump-starting the universe? How, Smolin further wants to know, can scientists ever empirically test their timeless cosmic hypotheses? With rare conceptual daring, Smolin beckons toward a new perspective for doing cosmological theory, a perspective allowing Leibniz’s principle of sufficient reason to open surprising possibilities. This horizon not only readmits time as a reality; it enshrines time as the reality, the indispensable point of flux allowing everything else, including the laws of matter and energy, to evolve and change. Embracing time as real, Smolin asserts, will allow cosmologists to convert laws once regarded as timeless into the contingent data they need to develop testable new theories of galactic evolution. More immediately, Smolin anticipates that this paradigm shift will help climatologists understand global warming and economists to ameliorate financial turbulence. A thrilling intellectual ride! --Bryce Christensen

Review

"[Smolin’s] book, a mix of science, philosophy and science fiction, is at once entertaining, thought-provoking, fabulously ambitious and fabulously speculative." —The New York Times

"Provocative, original, and unsettling." —The New York Review of Books

"Brilliant…Smolin gives what is, for me, the best analysis of the nature of time from a physics viewpoint in a popular science book I have ever seen." —Popular Science

"Smolin provides a much-needed dose of clarity about time, with implications that go far beyond physics to economics, politics, and personal philosophy. An essential book for physicists and non-physicists alike, Time Reborn offers a path to better theory and potentially to a better society." —Jaron Lanier, author of You Are Not a Gadget and The Fate of Power and the Future of Dignity

"Applying his deep mastery of cosmology, quantum mechanics, general relativity and all the diverse attempts at quantum gravity, in Time Reborn Lee Smolin weaves a convincing and entirely new view of reality. He shows us how contemporary physics eliminates time and argues persuasively that any adequate cosmology rests on making time and ‘now’ fundamental." —Stuart Kauffman, University of Vermont, author of At Home in the Universe

"Smolin is an excellent writer, a creative thinker and is ecumenical in the way he covers so many different branches of thought. Even as I mentally argued with this book, I kept on ploughing through to see how Smolin dealt with the objections. I would love to sit down with him over a drink and debate the ins and outs of his theory. And that is how this book should be read: as an account that makes you ask questions." —Nature

"An entertaining, head-spinning and, yes, timely blend of philosophy, science, and speculation to put the Now back into physics." —The Telegraph

"An energetic case for a paradigm shift that could produce mind-boggling changes in the way we experience our world." —Publishers Weekly

"A thoughtful, complex re-evaluation of the role of time in the universe…A flood of ideas from an imaginative thinker." —Kirkus

"With rare conceptual daring, Smolin beckons toward a new perspective for doing cosmological theory…A thrilling intellectual ride!"—Booklist (starred review)

See all Editorial Reviews
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt (April 23, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0547511728
  • ISBN-13: 978-0547511726
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 1.2 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (134 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #177,371 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Lee Smolin earned his Ph.D. in physics at Harvard, then went on to teach at Yale and Pennsylvania State before helping to found the innovative Perimeter Institute. He is the author of The Life of the Cosmos and Three Roads to Quantum Gravity.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

434 of 493 people found the following review helpful By physics lover VINE VOICE on March 22, 2013
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I was very excited when I ordered this book. The idea that the laws of nature may be time dependent has been debated by every generation of physicists since Isaac Newton. It is a romantic idea full of potential surprises, ripe for exciting new theories. It has not caught on, not because physicists shy away from it, but because experimental evidence is not there. (Every physicist, including myself, is very much intrigued by the possibility of time dependent physical laws, but we have not been able to make a fully scientific theory out of it (yet.)) In fact as of today, we don't have a shred of irrefutable experimental evidence that the laws of physics or any of the physical constants have changed since the first few seconds of big bang more than 13 billion years ago. (And we have no reliable idea how the universe was before the first few seconds.) Even so, I was still jazzed up about it. I did not expect to read about a full theory, but some coherent sketch of how it may work out. Unfortunately, the book fell way short of my expectations. This is not a scientific book; in fact it is not even a philosophical book. It is a book in which the author preaches the laymen from his high pulpit, stating his own pet theories and speculations as if they are facts, or at least as if they are likely to be true even though they have not been supported by any evidence yet.

I diligently read chapter after chapter expecting a high synthesis of ideas eventually. It never came. But it was much worse than that when I realized that the author was leading up to a type of "hidden variables" interpretation of Quantum Mechanics (QM).
Read more ›
41 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
58 of 70 people found the following review helpful By Joseph G. Wick on May 20, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Lee Smolin's book is fascinating, troubling, and probably the seed of a new way of looking at fundamental physics. I've long thought that modern mathematical physics may be going down a cul de sac because physicists confuse the metaphor (mathematics) with "reality." Smolin's book shows a willingness to avoid that trap. His arguments are interesting, well written, quite possibly fallacious from a logical point of view, and surprisingly devoid of mathematics.

The book has a number of good and bad points, perhaps too many to set forth here. It concerns our concepts of the universe from the all-embracing large to the inconceivably small. Along the way it drifts off to political, social, and economic commentary, which is nonetheless well tethered to the main arguments about science, but annoyingly distracting from his central theme.

In essence Smolin suggests a new way of looking at cosmological and quantum questions based largely on the approach of Gottfried Leibnitz who is credited by some with inventing calculus, by others with stealing it from Newton. Current physics is, in Smolin's eyes, too closely descended from Newton's "paradigm" of the universe and science with its concepts of absolute space and time and the more recent idea that time is an illusion or an "emergent" phenomenon. Although Einstein's approach made these concepts somewhat "relational," to Smolin he is too attached to the Newtonian "timeless" paradigm.

Smolin goes further back to Leibnitz (as do some other contemporary physicists). Leibnitz had a stronger concept of the relational characteristics of those things physicists measure and a set of rules to guide future theorists.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
96 of 119 people found the following review helpful By Metallurgist TOP 1000 REVIEWER on May 2, 2013
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
All in all, I found this book a bit too speculative for my tastes. While not to my taste, I do recommend this book to those who liked "The Life of the Cosmos", and to those who like to be mystified by all the possible ways in which our universe can be explained, even if none of them are proven science. This book would also appeal to those most interested in the philosophy of scientific ideas, as opposed to science as a descriptor of experimental observations. Those, like myself, who like their science to be coherent and based on actual data would likely not find this book to their liking. I like my science books to be grounded on accepted facts, so for me this was only a two-star book, but perhaps not for you.

In the author's own words (on page 243), "The developments described in Part II in chapters 11 through 18 are not yet fact and do not yet amount to a coherent theory." As such, I had to wonder if it was a bit premature to present ideas that are not yet coherent. I had the feeling that in a decade or so there might be enough data to determine which of the very many ideas contained in this book would be developed into a coherent theory and which would be discarded. Also, this book is replete with theories and ideas, so many that after a while I came to the conclusion that Professor Smolin was covering too much and that the book was not sufficiently focused.

What is in the book -
Time in the context of this book is more philosophical than the parameter found in many of the equations utilized in physics, such as that which defines velocity.
Read more ›
9 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
Time Reborn: From the Crisis in Physics to the Future of the Universe
This item: Time Reborn: From the Crisis in Physics to the Future of the Universe
Price: $28.00
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com

Want to discover more products? Check out this page to see more: cosmology