Timecode 2000 R CC

Amazon Instant Video

(41) IMDb 6.3/10
Available in HD

Mike Figgis' acclaimed experimental film comes to DVD! Four separate stories are told simultaneously, all in one continuous take, each occupying one-fourth of the screen. Ensemble cast includes Saffron Burrows, Kyle MacLachlan, Salma Hayek, Stellan Skarsgard and Jeanne Tripplehorn.

Starring:
Jeanne Tripplehorn, Stellan Skarsgard
Runtime:
1 hour 38 minutes

Available in HD on supported devices.

Introducing Amazon Fire TV

Watch Amazon Instant Video and more on your HDTV with Amazon Fire TV. Use voice search to instantly find TV shows, movies, actors, directors, and genres. Learn more

Timecode

By placing your order, you agree to our Terms of Use Sold by Amazon Digital Services, Inc. Additional taxes may apply.

Product Details

Genres Drama
Director Mike Figgis
Starring Jeanne Tripplehorn, Stellan Skarsgard
Supporting actors Saffron Burrows, Viveka Davis, Richard Edson, Aimee Graham, Salma Hayek, Glenne Headly, Andrew Heckler, Holly Hunter, Danny Huston, Daphna Kastner, Patrick Kearney, Elizabeth Low, Kyle MacLachlan, Mía Maestro, Leslie Mann, Suzy Nakamura, Alessandro Nivola, Zuleikha Robinson
Studio Screen Gems
MPAA rating R (Restricted)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Rental rights 24 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Other Formats

Customer Reviews

It is a challenging watch, but not as hard to follow as you might think.
turtlex
The story's conventionalism frustrated me because it begs the question of why it needs to be told with such an unusual narrative technique.
"snootchiebootchies"
Two of the frames spend almost the entire movie focused boring characters doing next to nothing.
"flickjunkie"

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Kerr on October 12, 2000
Format: DVD
4 digital cameras. 4 quadrants. 4 continuous shots. All in real time. All improvised. Mike Figgis (Leaving Las Vegas) is definitely one of the most innovative directors out there. And that's what makes the film worth seeing. It wasn't as challenging as I thought it would be to follow all four quadrants at the same time. Figgis turns the volume up on the shot he wants you to pay attention to. The cast does a fine job, although I'm not exactly sure what Salma Hayak is doing in this company. Stellan Skarsgard is great as usual. Jeanne Tripplehorn is literally on screen in a continuous shot for the length of the film and she is fantastic. Look out for Holly Hunter, who has very little screen time, but who gives her character more depth than this film deserves. The reason I only gave this film 3 stars is that it didn't engage me. Watch it for its stylistic qualities and not for its story. I recommend the DVD format. After all, digital cameras deserve digital video.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Jeremy Heilman on September 5, 2001
Format: DVD
True, Mike Figgis' great experiment is not an unqualified success, but it's so far from a failure that it deserves recognition. The split-screen shooting, which initially might seem a gimmick, quickly becomes a revelation. (I remember audibly gasping the first time two images combined to form one.) Few commercial directors are as actively trying to redefine and reinvent the form as Figgis. Gimmicks/innovations aside, the film is a hilarious send up of both Hollywood-style politics and Altmanesque busy narratives. The DVD version features perhaps the best use of the technology yet, allowing the viewer to see an alternate take of the entire film, and freely switch between soundtracks.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By turtlex on March 14, 2001
Format: DVD
Time Code is an excellent example of what film can and should be. It's definitely an experiment that the affordability of digital video allows. Shot on a Sony digitial video camera, Mike Figgis has woven a great story. The screen is split into four separate quardants, four intertwining, and simultaneous, storylines. I defy you to follow a single set of characters. Figgis uses sound to draw you through the story, raising and lowering the levels of different quads he'd like you to be looking at. It's excellent filmmaking. It is a challenging watch, but not as hard to follow as you might think. This excellent DVD version has an entire other "version 1" of the film which even features different actors. It's great fun. Highly recommended to the Indie Film Fan. Best regards, turtlex.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By "emeraldavatar" on February 26, 2001
Format: DVD
Film is an art form. Sometimes. Timecode is art. Its story reminds me of an Altman movie (one of the old ones, from when he knew what he was doing), but presented in real time and split into four points of view presented simultaneously. For the first ten minutes or so, it's difficult to follow the four screens, but it's not as confusing as you might think. The stories are touching, although they could have been tightened a little bit - at times it looks like the actors are drowning in improvisation. Most of the time, however, things flow beautifully. The stories are great, just don't expect them to be all wrapped up neatly by the end of the movie. They're more like "slice of life" stories. A few people have criticized Timecode for the fact that a boom and a cameraman's hand intrude into the shot during the movie. Come on - we're talking about four cameras moving simultaneously around a bunch of improvising actors for two hours at a time! It is utterly impossible to expect a perfect shot under these circumstances. Plus these people are totally missing the point. One final note - the DVD includes an alternate take which, as I understand it, is a complete alternate version of the film. I can't wait to see this.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Gypsy Gies on January 22, 2001
Format: VHS Tape
I had a great deal of fun with this video. I rented in on VHS, and am now buying it (DVD for the soundtrack control). I watched the film twice over, and caught so many more things the second time than the first. The first part of the viewing you spend trying to figure out how all these characters connect to each other, and then you relax into the flow of them popping in and out of various corners of the screen. Amazing timing ...just Amazing timing for one-take. Julian Sands' entire purpose in the film seems to be to distract the other actors and see if they get lost. This makes his background-character entertaining. I found myself backing the film up several times in certain places because as I was paying attension one thing, I suddenly realized the scene was slowly changing in another corner and I was like "wait a minute...what's happening over _there_..?". Over-all, the four simultanious corners of action are not that hard to follow. Mike Figgis uses sound to take you every place you need to go to figure out what is happening. I found the performances of Jeanne Tripplehorn and Saffron Burrows particulary well done. Both are on screen through most of the film and keep up character perfectly. Not a film for people who do not like to use their mind while watching. Mike Figgis does not spoon-feed his viewers (thank you). All in all very inventive and well done !
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Westley TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on April 6, 2002
Format: DVD
"Time Code" was directed by Mike Figgis, best known for "Leaving Las Vegas." I'm not a fan of his work, but was intrigued by the concept of this movie - it was filmed in one 90-minute take and is told via four cameras shown in different quadrants of the screen. The movie was filmed 15 different times over a period of a few weeks, with the 15th take being the theatrical release. The story (such as it is) concerns 20+ people in Los Angeles who are connected in one way or another to a small indie film studio. The soundtrack is emphasized in certain quadrants at any given time to show you where to direct your attention. I was concerned that the movie would be difficult to follow, especially on a TV, but it was actually fairly easy to watch it and understand what was transpiring.
The technique is innovative and daring, and one cannot help but admire its audacity. It was also interesting seeing how the different stories overlapped. However, there are simply too many weak points for the movie to ultimately succeed. First, the acting and script was largely improvised, and it shows. Selma Hayek has one of the largest roles, and she is simply not up to the challenge. Holly Hunter also comes off poorly with her tentative stuttering character. Second, the plot (which was loosely structured by Figgis) is not very interesting. If this same script was shot in a conventional manner, it would not be worth the price of admission. Third, the concept of the four quadrants is interesting, but most of the time little is happening in any given quadrant. For example, the upper left quadrant, features mostly Jeanne Tripplehorn and she spends a huge portion of the movie sitting in the backseat of a limo or pacing the sidewalk in front of the studio. It just isn't very entertaining.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Product Images from Customers

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search
ARRAY(0xa5c9c414)