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The Life and Times of Martha Washington in the Twenty-First Century Paperback – July 6, 2010


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 600 pages
  • Publisher: Dark Horse (July 6, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1595824820
  • ISBN-13: 978-1595824820
  • Product Dimensions: 6.7 x 1.1 x 10.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.8 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #90,074 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

In 1990, Miller, the writer-artist of Batman: The Dark Knight Returns, and Gibbons, the artist of Watchmen (the two most acclaimed and influential comics of the 1980s, which led to a tide of super antiheroes), created a full-fledged hero in the form of female warrior Martha Washington. Set in a farcically dystopian near future, the tale followed its heroine from her childhood in the Chicago projects through her rise in the military, serving a nation that’s not only at war with 40 other countries but is soon roiled by secession. Miller expands upon the absurdist genre trappings that distinguished his Dark Knight series but consistently treats Washington with an admiring dignity, and Gibbons’ artwork limns her exploits with clarity and verve. The pair returned to the character repeatedly over the following decade, with her exploits growing ever more outlandish, eventually leading her to save the entire planet before heading to the far reaches of outer space. The presumably complete saga is collected in this massive volume, which is sure to be greeted enthusiastically by the creators’ many fans. --Gordon Flagg

Customer Reviews

Nice binding great color and art.
Jefferson S. White
In the end it's really interesting, and is a very trenchant commentary on modern societal patterns and behaviors.
J. D. Mason
If you're looking for a good story, you've hit the jackpot too.
ACE

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By M. Uribe on February 26, 2010
Format: Hardcover
This is a great book, very heavy, great story, i have to admit that the ending was not really one of my favorites and somewhat disappointed, felt like they could have gone a little further and maybe had a better ending. But if you like a story enough that you debate the ending enough, you know you enjoyed it.

You want to root for Martha every step of the way, from her child hood to adult hood. You want her to go far, and its sad at the obstacles she has to face. But its through these obstacles, and humbleness that make her such a great character. I have to agree the story can be messy at times, and some of the later stories are a little bizarre. But i would recommend this to any comic fan or first time comic reader alike.

The question now, who can play her in a real live movie ! Get this book it will be a collectors item for sure
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Stephen Payne on March 10, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Frank Miller and Dave Gibbons give the future a dark, satiric edge in which feminists, fast food chains and super intelligent computers vie for control of 21st century America. Violent, depressing but ultimately uplifting, Martha Washington's life is a reminder that while evil remains ever busy, the good must continue the good fight, even if their actions are ultimately futile.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By D. Cantland on June 20, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I owned these as individual books. Once I got this gem, I was able to enjoy them in one volume. It's not small, but can be read as a complete body of work as I think embodies the original intent of the writer and artists.

Many current characters seem to bear close resemblance to this character
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Format: Paperback
I grew up hearing a lot of interesting things regarding Martha Washington, a dynamic character shaped by Frank Miller's writing and Dave Gibbons' excellent pencil-work. I would have shelled out money for the individual trades, but I came across this beautifully bound omnibus instead. If you want to own all of Martha's adventures, including the one-shots, this is the book to get. Each story is prefaced by mini-essays written by Gibbons himself, and these introductions are worth reading because the man genuinely cares about this character and all of the things he and Frank had to go through to bring her to life.

Story-wise, the best part of Martha's tale is captured in her first graphic novel, Give Me Liberty. This was written around the time when Frank Miller's storytelling abilities were on a major roll, as was Dave Gibbons' gritty, cinematic layouts. GML chronicles Martha Washington's birth, her troubled childhood in a futuristic slum, and her trials as a soldier. She rises through the ranks, fights corruption within her own army, and experiences the collapse of an already broken political system first-hand. It's pretty heavy-going at times, but the satire is funny, the world is superbly fleshed out (via mock magazine articles that crop up throughout the story), the dialogue is sharp, and the pacing is on par with any good science fiction movie.

GML is followed by a few standalone stories, which are pretty good and remind me of classic 2000 AD progs. These stories pave the way for the book's second arc, Martha Washington Goes to War. It's a decent story, but it doesn't hold a candle to GML in terms of depth and insight. Miller's writing takes a few left turns, and some of the characters and situations become a bit more removed from the grittiness of the last arc.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By woodrow locksley on August 15, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Comics by way of the graphic novel have grown up in the last 30 years.Led by Art Spiegelmans publishing of his fathers holocaust experiences and his relationship with hisfather as he tells his story, Maus showed that comics can tell any type of story and do it well.The Hernandez have explored the cultural matrix of Mexican communities both in Mexico and the United States.Peter Bagge has satrirized American Life.Joe Sacco has done journalism through comics more effectivelythan most journalists anfd there are many others like Dan Clowes Chris Ware and Dauid Mazzucchelli who have explored the human condition in interesting and powerful ways.But what about the action adventure genre that is at the heart of comic books?There is good news here as well.Frank Miller and Dave Gibbons chronicled through a set of stories the life of an African American woman from her childhood in a Chicago slum to distinguished service as a warrior and most importantly as a champion of liberty as a member of a futuristic American army.Millers writing is oftwn wild and his political speculations take satire to an absurdity that can be hard to take at times but there is no denying the energy and his main theme that freedom is more important than security an that anytime a government says we need to reduce freedom to enhance security then both freedom and true security are at risk very much influenced by Ayn Rand but also by many of the founding fathers who believed the same thing. Dave Gibbons art is clear and well constructed giving depth to Millers writing because of its realism and he is a fine letterer as well. The color art especially after the Give Me Liberty section of the novel is magnificent. Martha Washington was originally published as three seperate smaller graphic novels and three one shotsbut it is shown to be a coherent whole one large novel in this collection.It is a first rate example of the action adventure genre particularily in comics and I RECOMMEND IT MOST HIGHLY
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