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Times to Remember Hardcover – January 1, 1995

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Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

First published in 1974 and out of print for many years, matriarch Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy's autobiography is by turns conventional, tedious, intimately revealing, evasive, sugar-coated, tough-minded and touching. Now 104, she began her political life at the age of five, when her father, John Francis Fitzgerald, was elected to Congress; he later became mayor of Boston. In their warm foreword to this reissue, Rose's children?Edward Kennedy, Eunice Shriver, Patricia Lawford, Jean Smith?call her "the best politician in our family," and indeed, she relives her prominent role in accompanying her husband, Joseph Kennedy, FDR's ambassador to the Court of St. James, to Great Britain as war clouds gathered over Europe, and her vigorous campaigning for her sons, John and Bobby, in 1960 and 1968. Strewn with quotes from letters, diaries and recollections by family members and Kennedy watchers, this conversational, unpretentious memoir is particularly interesting when Rose is discussing JFK's illnesses and injuries, raising her nine children, her mentally retarded daughter, Rosemary, and the deep religious faith that sustained her through personal tragedies. Photos.
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal

"A serious, positive account of what is by any standard an awesome life," said LJ's reviewer of Kennedy's autobiography (LJ 5/15/74). This 20th anniversary edition includes a new foreword by Kennedy's children. "Those who are drawn to it will be more than satisfied."
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc.
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 461 pages
  • Publisher: Doubleday; Reissue edition (January 1, 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0385476574
  • ISBN-13: 978-0385476577
  • Product Dimensions: 1.8 x 6.8 x 9.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (23 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #793,980 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By BeatleBangs1964 VINE VOICE on September 23, 2000
Format: Hardcover
I received this book as a present and it remains a treasured gift to this day. Rose Kennedy was clearly a very intelligent and literate woman from all accounts and this shows in her memoir.

My favorite parts of this book are the parts outlining the growth and development of Robert Kennedy. We watch him remain in character. His progress is tracked from the time he doggedly tried to teach himself to swim at age 4 to some 35 years later, in 1965 when the then Senator, an acrophobe, climbed a previously unscaled mountain in Canada out of love for his slain brother. Robert Kennedy was a stubborn, determined hardworking person and these traits showed up early in his life.

From all accounts, Rose and Robert Kennedy were close. In looking at pictures of the mother and the son the physical resemblance is quite strong. Robert Kennedy was the only one of the sons to have the "Fitzgerald" face. Like his maternal grandfather who, in Doris Kearns Goodwin's book, "the Fitzgeralds and the Kennedys," Mayor John Fitzgerald took up a rigorous physical regimen to develop himself into a runner and augment his physical strength. We see this same characteristic in Robert Kennedy, the boy who tried to teach himself to swim, the undergrad who was determined to show his mettle on the football field and the man who would, in 1965 climb that mountain. Both mother and son shared a deep devotion to Catholicism and both were consistently described as serious and committed to following their social consciences.

This book is such a treasure chest of memories and is well worth reading time and again.
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19 of 24 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 27, 1999
Format: Hardcover
When I heard that JFK Jr. was missing, I was overwhelmed by sadness. I retrieved an old edition of this book from a box and started reading. Unfortunately, after a couple hundred pages, I turned to my husband and said "Can you believe that neither these two people (Rose and Joe) and their family, nor their own parents and grand-parents, or the grand-children, ever had a single flaw? Not one? They are guilty of no wrongdoing whatsoever, none of them! Ever! It seems that Rose has a rational explanation for anything any member of her family ever did that may have seemed improper or unwise and excuses them systematically, thereby portraying them as demi-gods. She also virtually credits the Fitzgeralds and the Kennedys with singlehandedly molding America'a values and goals. You want to think of the Kennedys as human beings with their own victories and tragedies, but Rose somehow denies them most of their humanity and vulnerability. Makes you wonder what motivated her to publish such memoirs. It seems like it was intended more to restore some lost dignity than to present a family as it really was. Is remains a great read, but feels like one of fiction, which is a disapointment.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 5, 1999
Format: Hardcover
This book shows that a family can stand together for century's. I enjoyed the history. I feel the infomation that I got in this book was the truth and not just someone telling it someway. It was real! Best book I'v read in long time. Your'v got to read it.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By MadameX on July 11, 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book is well worth reading. Rose Kennedy's book is inspiring and there are many warm memories and stories of raising her children. Joe Kennedy, Sr comes across as much more human and understanding than he was portrayed in the media. Articles written have always implied that President Kennedy was pushed into politics and the presidency by his father. Not so, according to Rose Kennedy and she says that even if such a command had been given, she can imagine her son smiling and saying, "yes, Dad", as when she told him to wear a sweater and he said "yes, Mother" and then went off without it. There are lots of pictures of the Kennedys when they were children. When the whole family posed for a picture, the combination of their mega watt smile makes it hard to feel bad about anything. No matter what Rose Kennedy is writing about, even the worst of tragedies, there is never an ounce of self-pity or blaming but instead a strong faith and gratitude for the things she does have. I know there was mention that the book was sugar coated in parts but I saw it more as Rose Kennedy reserving parts of herself that she probably did not share with anyone and especially did not want to share with the public. Even so, no matter what the situation she dealt with it remarkably and I found the book quite uplifting.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Shannon G. Palm on October 2, 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I once read Maria Shriver's list of her top ten favorite books, and of course, this at the top. Found out is was out of print, so I picked it up at a second hand store. Rose was an amazing woman who did her best to instill values in her rambunctious brood of children inspite of many adversities surrounding her. How she did it is revealed in her own words in this favorite of mine. Discovered the book missing, when I went looking for it shortly after Ted Kennedys funeral. There it was on Amazon within seconds!! Although I do not agree with many of the Kennedy's political views, I am intrigued by how a mother's influence can instill in her children the desire to respect and give much to our country and its people. I myself have four almost grown wild boys, and married into a large, loud, active, strongly opinaited family. This book is inspiring to me as a mother, and future grandmother who will always hold her hear up high with dignity even through times of less than perfect children!
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