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Tin Machine II Import


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1. Baby Universal
2. One Shot
3. You Belong In Rock N' Roll
4. If There is Something
5. Amlapura
6. Betty Wrong
7. You Can't Talk
8. Stateside
9. Shopping For Girls
10. A Big Hurt
11. Sorry
12. Goodbye Mr. Ed

Product Details

  • Audio CD
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Import
  • Label: Jvc Victor
  • ASIN: B0000074HN
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #503,431 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Eric Simms on December 20, 2001
Format: Audio CD
Tin Machine was not what Bowie fans expected and that was the point. This was Bowies saving grace where he returned to being just part of a whole and not the lead man in charge. With Tin Machine I & II Bowie excaped the "POP Star" tag and in the process rejuvinated himself to take the new millineum by storm.
Both Tin Machine albums are amazing because they are demonstrations of an artist searchng and finding associations within himself. This was a very risky thing to do in my opinion. Imagine Madonna joining Radiohead for two albums or Prince teaming up with Ministry. These things never happen. Only someone like David Bowie could have pulled Tin Machine off.
Tim Machine is and exercize in "Intellectual Chaos" or "Educated Punk". The lyrics are some of Bowies best and the songs are an intergration of Reeves Gabrels, Hunt Sales, Tony Sales and David Bowies combined talents.
The Cd starts out with "Baby Universal" a driving spacerock story about a man searching for himself (sound familar?). Next comes "One Shot" a rocking lament to lost love. "You Belong In Rock & Roll" pulls you in and makes you move( The title tells it all.) "If There Is Something" sounds like a classic from the start with lots of inuendos and hooks. "Amlapura" is a sweeping rock colored epic ballad with lyrics that paint a world with Bowies eyes. "Betty Wrong" is a nasty grinding sax touched torch song. "You Cant Talk" twists lyrics and guitar strings with a driving beat. "State Side" a bluesrock song that casts Bowie as backup singer with Hunt Sales on lead vocals. "Shopping For Girls" rolls out Bowies gift for adstraction.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Alex Newton on January 15, 2006
Format: Audio CD
After a successful Sound + Vision, everyone expected David Bowie to deliver the goods again...and they were disappionted by Tin Machine, which was understandable. Shortly thereafter, Tin Machine II was released, and nobody even payed attention to it; it should have-would have-been a success, if only it had gotten beyond the fans of Bowie. A solid hard-rocking album highlighted by "One Shot", "If There is Something" and "Stateside", it delivers 13 songs, most of them good-to-exceptional, with great musical variety. Either of the first two of those could have been a hit single, as Reeves Gabrels shines in "If There Is Something" with terrific soloing. This is a great addition, however anonymous, to any rock-fan's collection, and worth every cent of the 10-to-20 dollars one would pay for it.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 23, 2000
Format: Audio CD
Okay, I don't know what "emetic" means, but I have listened to the album. The first thing to mention is that you're getting two non-Bowie tracks here: "Stateside" and "Sorry," which were sung by the drummer. Why would you want someone else in the band to sing leads when your singer is David Bowie? I have no idea. Don't replace him with this guy, anyway. You'll most likely program those two tracks out right away. They really bite.
The rest of the album is decent. Reeves Gabrels doesn't dive-bomb his whammy bar all the time like on the first CD, and David throws in a little sax here and there. "Baby Universal" is nifty pop, "Big Hurt" is a stupid heavy metal song, "If There Is Something" just rocks, and "Goodbye Mr. Ed" sounds more like solo Bowie stuff. All good.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 14, 1999
Format: Audio CD
Not as good as some of what Bowie has done but much better than that dribble from the 80's prior to this. It's grunge before grunge was a type of music, it's punk it's metal it's blues. Above all it's damn fun to listen to.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 14, 1999
Format: Audio CD
This is definitely some of Bowie's most intuitive work. The lyrics themselves are poetry even if the music is at times somewhat like cellophane. I personally found the music not nearly straightforward, appropriately undergirding and moody. The musicians are very adept and the raw sound let's it show. Don't judge this book by it's cover. It will take several listening sessions to catch the rapids beneath the sheen exterior. Altogether, the sound is intellectually sheik.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 5, 1999
Format: Audio CD
Not as raw as the first Tin Machine effort, and certainly more slick. Still, there are some good moments on Bowie's "return to the garage" LP. Their rendition of Bryan Ferry's "If there is something" is riveting. "Amlapura" and "Betty Wrong" are elaborately arranged. Hunt Sales vocals on the ultra-blues tune "Stateside" are excellent. If you liked TMI, you should own this worthy follow-up album.
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10 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Olly Buxton on November 13, 2000
Format: Audio CD
Tin Machine II picks up where Tin Machine left off, and in most senses corrects the errors of the first-born: Reeves Gabrels' ministry-of-silly-walks guitar playing is spanked and told to behave itself; the production is snappier and cleaner, the mix is better, the band is miles tighter and the songs are more focussed - there are no cacophonic space-jams here, thank you very much. And thank heavens for that.
The songwriting is just as good, in a slow burning way. The first couple of listens singularly failed to grab me (not helped by Baby Universal being a fairly humdrum opener), but I gave it a couple more goes and an hour after the fifth spin it hit me that actually Betty Wrong is a terrific song, as classically Bowie as any thing from "Heroes", and before long Shopping for Girls, Goodbye Mr Ed and the almost Bowie-free Stateside were rolling round in my head the way all good Bowie tunes do, cheeky lines about Kennedy convertibles, Marilyn inflatables and fellows with no heads repeating on me and yes, even causing a chuckle. Goodness me, there's life in the old dog yet.
But the record still isn't as fresh as Tin Machine I, which for all its flaws I find the more pleasing effort. And fundamentally, history will mark the Tin Machine phenomenon as the fair breeze which blew the Good Ship David Bowie back off the rocks, rather than the one which saw him home, and I suppose in a way that's fitting: Now he's back to something approaching his creative best, I don't miss Tin Machine. But in 1989, the dreadful strains of "Too Dizzy" still in my head, it may as well have been the second coming. Tin Machine killed off Never Let Me Down, and everything it stood for. And we can all be thankful for that.
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