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  • Tiny Furniture (The Criterion Collection) [Blu-ray]
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Tiny Furniture (The Criterion Collection) [Blu-ray]


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Frequently Bought Together

Tiny Furniture (The Criterion Collection) [Blu-ray] + Girls: Season 1 (Blu-ray/DVD Combo + Digital Copy) + Girls: Season 2 (Blu-ray/DVD Combo + Digital Copy)
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Product Details

  • Actors: Lena Dunham
  • Directors: Lena Dunham
  • Format: Multiple Formats, AC-3, Blu-ray, Color, DTS Surround Sound, NTSC, Subtitled, Widescreen
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: English
  • Region: Region A/1 (Read more about DVD/Blu-ray formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.77:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: Unrated
  • Studio: Criterion Collection
  • DVD Release Date: February 14, 2012
  • Run Time: 99 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (116 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00687XNVM
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #126,030 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Special Features

New digital transfer

Director Lena Dunham talks about filmmaking and autobiography in a new interview

New interview with writer-director Paul Schrader

Creative Nonfiction, Dunham's first feature film

Four short films by Dunham

Trailer

PLUS: A booklet featuring an essay by critic Phillip Lopate


Editorial Reviews

Lena Dunham got her start making YouTube videos, but she emerged as a major talent thanks to the breakthrough success of this exceptionally sharp comedy, which garnered the twenty-four-year-old writer-director-actor comparisons to the likes of Woody Allen. The filmmaker herself plays Aura, a recent college graduate who returns to New York and moves back in with her mother and sister (played by their real-life counterparts). Though Aura is gripped by stasis and confusion about her future, Dunham locates endless sources of refreshing humor in her plight. As painfully confessional as it is endlessly amusing, Tiny Furniture is an authentic, incisive portrait of a young woman at a crossroads.

Customer Reviews

None of the characters seem real in any sense: they all whine on screen -- there is not one sympathetic character.
Cp Steine
While the first 20 minutes are really dry and almost boring enough to consider switching it over, Tiny Furniture ends up being not that bad of a film in the long run.
B. E Jackson
The problem is, I don't know if she's trying to make a statement about women not having perfect bodies or if she was just to lazy to get into shape for this movie.
spaceracers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Amazon Instant Video
When Lena Dunham's "Tiny Furniture" debuted in 2010, it became somewhat of a critical darling with near unanimous praise from mainstream outlets. Heck, Dunham even won an Independent Spirit Award for its screenplay. While the film is an interesting, if somewhat slight, indie--it probably plays to a more niche market than the critics would have you suspect. Dunham's work (she is its writer, director, and star) and characters ably showcase a combination of post-collegiate ennui and over-educated (and pseudo-intellectual) entitlement. Set in a fashionable New York City young, artistic and urban environment--the film's sardonic tone and cultural critique was sometimes reminiscent (to me) of the works of Whit Stillman (Metropolitan) but with an edgier and more modernized vibe. But the quirky story, which can be quite funny, also achieves a quiet poignancy when you least expect it. I suspect that, in many ways, "Tiny Furniture" will be fairly divisive when discovered by a wider audience. While I do think many will embrace its plentiful charms, I think it will have just as many detractors who might not connect with its core characters.

Dunham plays a recent film school graduate who returns home to live with her mother and sister in New York. Reeling with uncertainty, she has no idea what to do with her life. She reconnects with old friends, take a entry level job, spars with her sister and generally just goes with the flow with a rather apathetic view toward the future. Some of the film's funniest moments are provided by the almost elitist and superior set of friends that Dunham weaves throughout the picture. Kids who have more confidence and entitlement than ambition or talent.
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41 of 47 people found the following review helpful By RMurray847 VINE VOICE on November 29, 2011
Format: Blu-ray
I FULLY ACKNOWLEDGE THAT I HAVE NOT SEEN THE CRITERION BLU RAY. THIS IS A REVIEW OF THE MOVIE ITSELF. I PUT IT OUT HERE, BECAUSE I THINK SO FEW PEOPLE HAVE HEARD OF IT OR KNOW ANYTHING ABOUT IT. TO THOSE WHO THINK WRITING A REVIEW FOR A PRODUCT THAT ISN'T OUT YET IS "BAD"...I APOLOGIZE.

Aura has just finished college in Ohio. Her major is Film Theory. Her boyfriend of 3 years has broken up with her, however. With no job prospects and no love life, she returns to the NYC home of her mother and her gifted younger sister Nadine. She spends a lot of time moping and she half-heartedly restarts a friendship with the far perkier, but clearly spoiled and selfish Charlotte. She takes a low paying job as a day hostess. She half-heartedly dates a Youtube star she meets at a party and she half-heartedly flirts with a good-looking but attached chef at her restaurant.

Aura is utterly aimless...and it is her aimlessness that is the focus of director/writer/star Lena Dunham's TINY FURNITURE. It's a very low-budget film that depicts lots of listless young people doing a lot of whining, navel-gazing and engaging in sharp-edged banter. The movie shows us a very tiny little particular sub-culture of humanity (bored, over-educated, under-employed New York City residents with artistic pretensions). It feels very real and specific...yet the people we meet are extremely aggravating. Some will find them actively upsetting. I found most of them to be beneath getting worked up about...but just low-grade annoyances. And absolutely NOT people I'd want to spend time with.

Aura makes mistakes with both men...but neither of them was right for her anyway.
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44 of 56 people found the following review helpful By Christopher Mueller on July 9, 2012
Format: Amazon Instant Video Verified Purchase
If you've enjoyed GIRLS, you will also enjoy this film. I respect what this movie is trying to do, but I cannot endorse it.

This movie is trying to explore the angst and sadness that comes from leaving college and entering the real world. A protected undergraduate world full of academic concerns and intellectual friendships transitioning to an awful job, moving back in with one's family, a realization that the real world is not ivory towers and existential debates. It's a common plight in modern times, and surely many can relate.

I have to say, though, this movie impossible to watch. The characters are "real" in the sense that they are deeply pathetic and depressed. The dialogue is sharp and biting and blatantly (disgustingly) poetic. Mostly the dialogue is awkward, but moreover is incredibly disrespectful and antagonist. The characters are so thoroughly misdirected and unpleasant, it's not worth describing them as "real". Rather, they are caricatures of angst, depression, and loneliness. I have never met "real" people who are as consistently making such stupid decisions and who have such little respect for other human beings. Also, "real" people smile sometimes.

The whole movie is ugly: wallowing in pathos with no real plot or direction. And that's the whole point.
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Format: DVD
When Lena Dunham's "Tiny Furniture" debuted in 2010, it became somewhat of a critical darling with near unanimous praise from mainstream outlets. Heck, Dunham even won an Independent Spirit Award for its screenplay. While the film is an interesting, if somewhat slight, indie--it probably plays to a more niche market than the critics would have you suspect. In that way, it seems an ideal choice for a boutique Criterion presentation. Dunham's work (she is its writer, director, and star) and characters ably showcase a combination of post-collegiate ennui and over-educated (and pseudo-intellectual) entitlement. Set in a fashionable New York City young, artistic and urban environment--the film's sardonic tone and cultural critique was sometimes reminiscent (to me) of the works of Whit Stillman (Metropolitan) but with an edgier and more modernized vibe. But the quirky story, which can be quite funny, also achieves a quiet poignancy when you least expect it. I suspect that, in many ways, "Tiny Furniture" will be fairly divisive when discovered by a wider audience. While I do think many will embrace its plentiful charms, I think it will have just as many detractors who might not connect with its core characters.

Dunham plays a recent film school graduate who returns home to live with her mother and sister in New York. Reeling with uncertainty, she has no idea what to do with her life. She reconnects with old friends, take a entry level job, spars with her sister and generally just goes with the flow with a rather apathetic view toward the future. Some of the film's funniest moments are provided by the almost elitist and superior set of friends that Dunham weaves throughout the picture. Kids who have more confidence and entitlement than ambition or talent.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
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