Price: $17.98 & FREE Shipping on orders over $49. Details
Only 3 left in stock. Sold by MK_Beauty and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

One-time purchase:

Tiparos Thai Fish Sauce 2... has been added to your Cart

Other Sellers on Amazon
Add to Cart
$17.98
& FREE Shipping on eligible orders. Details
Sold by: GoodBoy
Add to Cart
$17.98
& FREE Shipping on eligible orders. Details
Sold by: Valle Sol Organix
Add to Cart
$22.73
+ Free Shipping
Sold by: Shipped freshly from Germany in usually 2-3 weeks
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Bai
Subscribe & Save Save an additional 20-30% on new subscriptions to Bai, Coca-Cola, Kellogg's, Health Warrior, and more. Shop now.

Tiparos Thai Fish Sauce 23 Oz. X 2 Blt.

4.2 out of 5 stars 71 customer reviews
| 10 answered questions
About the Product
  • Order more than one item and save on shipping.

Frequently Bought Together

  • Tiparos Thai Fish Sauce 23 Oz. X 2 Blt.
  • +
  • Mae Ploy Thai Red Curry Paste - 14 ounce per jar
  • +
  • Mae Ploy Thai Green Curry Paste - 14 oz jar
Total price: $31.00
Buy the selected items together


Product Description

Fish sauce is the single, most important flavoring ingredient in Thai cooking (also well-loved in Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam, Burma and the Philippines). Used like salt in western cooking and soy sauce in Chinese cooking, good-quality fish sauce imparts a distinct aroma and flavor all its own. Large bottle will get you on the right track to start making all of your favorite Thai dishes. Simply put: if it doesn't have fish sauce, it can't be considered Thai. We are proud to offer Tiparos brand, made by one of Thailand's premier food companies, First Grade export quality. All natural.

Product Details

  • Shipping Weight: 3.9 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • ASIN: B000EICPAG
  • Country of Origin: USA
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (71 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #75,136 in Grocery & Gourmet Food (See Top 100 in Grocery & Gourmet Food)

Important Information

Ingredients

anchovy fish, water, salt, sugar

Legal Disclaimer

Actual product packaging and materials may contain more and different information than what is shown on our website. We recommend that you do not rely solely on the information presented and that you always read labels, warnings, and directions before using or consuming a product. Please see our full disclaimer below.


Customer Questions & Answers

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

I was raised on this brand of fish sauce. To me, Tiparos is the greatest brand. You can't get any better than this. Add a couple squirts to raw eggs, then scramble them in a pan, and eat with fresh, hot, white rice. That's quick and delicious. We use fish sauce to cook all of our Thai meals and marinate beef and chicken for various dishes. For me, there is no other.
1 Comment 43 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Verified Purchase
I used this for my authentic, home made Kim Chi. The first time I used it, I thought it was going to be a sweet smelling fish sauce, maybe similar to a hoisin sauce; but nope, it smells ripe and funky, similar to peeling off a sock from a foot with gangrene. Well, maybe not that bad, but it does have a fermented flesh smell - and trust me, it isn't sweet.

I thought it was going to ruin my Kim Chi, and to be honest with you, when I tasted the Kim Chi right after I made it, it did seem to ruin it. But after two days of fermenting with the spices and the cabbage, the Kim Chi turned out to be phenomenal. I've never made such authentic, yummy Kim Chi in my life! Whatever it is, this sauce did the trick. The ingredients seem to be pure with no added icky stuff, however, the cheap plastic container made me worry about BPA. But that's how most asian ingredients are packaged. Overall, I am happy I purchased this off Amazon.
Comment 19 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
If you are planning on making some thai recipes at home this is the best Thai fish sauce money can buy. Add some sugar, some water, mint cilantro and chilies and you'll have a staple of Thai cooking, serve that dressing with Spring rolls, Thai noodles and even brussels sprouts and you'll have a hit! Check out my blog for a nice recipe using that stuff.
Comment 31 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Here is a common recipe that shows the possibilities of fish sauce, Chicken and Holy Basil. This is my favorite version, there are many others.

Ingredients:
The proportions of ingredients are strictly to your taste. My wife and I will use one large chicken breast, a whole bell pepper and a medium onion. Too much chicken makes the dish too meaty for my taste, but as long as it cooks uniformly there's no right or wrong.

1-2 boneless, skinless chicken breasts, cut into about 1" strips pieces. I prefer all natural or organic, never frozen. It costs more but tastes much better. You can also add another chicken breast or two to scale up the recipe. If you prefer, you can also cut the chicken into julienne pieces or even 1-2" cubes. It tastes great however you do it!
1 bell pepper, seeded and cut into thin strips. I prefer yellow, as it's sweeter than green. If you want more vegetables, add another pepper or more onion. Just increase the sauce a little bit.
3-4 cloves of garlic sliced thin
1 small to medium onion cut into thin slices
1-2 jalapeno peppers, seeded and sliced thin. You can use Thai peppers or even serrano peppers if you like it more fiercely hot. The amount of pepper controls the heat. You can omit these if you don't have the palate for spicy.
1 cup fresh basil leaves. If you can actually get Thai basil this is best, but any will do, the fresher the better. Feel free to add extra, particularly if you are increasing the amount of chicken and vegetables.
Read more ›
Comment 24 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
... were a basic flavoring ingredient in the cuisine of ancient Rome and Etruria, used as widely as The Chinese use soya sauce or the Americans use catsup. It may be something of a surprise that the same fish sauce is one of the necessary elements of the Southeast Asian cookery, from Burma to the Philippines. The clear pungent liquid is called 'ngapi' in Burmese, 'nam pla' in Thai, 'nuoc nam' in Vietnamese 'yu chiap' in Chinese, and 'patis' in Tagalog. Tiparos is a good brand, and this is a proper price.

The Thais serve "prik nam pla" as a condiment on the table for every meal. It's simple 'fish sauce' with chopped Thai chilis, those little hot devils, and chopped coriander weed, commonly called 'cilantro' in parts of the USA. It's indispensable. You can judge the authenticity of a Thai restaurant by whether you are served prik nam pla automatically, or have to ask for it, or can't even get it. In the latter case, you are ethically authorized to walk out without paying your bill.

Likewise, any Thai or Vietnamese cookbook that doesn't discuss the uses of fish sauce would be better reserved for starting campfires.

As I said, the Romans used the same stuff, which they called LIQUAMEN. My guess is that as the Empire was transformed by immigration from the north, especially via Gaul, fish sauce was replaced by sea salt and rock salt. The Haida, Tlingit, and Kwakiutl peoples of the Pacific Northwest used the oil squeezed from candlefish for a similar taste treat. That oil was so valuable as a trade item that wars were fought over it.

Soya sauce is NOT an adequate substitute, whatever your Betty Crocker cookbook says. But now you can get fish sauce anywhere you choose to live. I'm still getting accustomed to the implications of internet shopping. Imagine this: I can get a novel by Roberto Bolaños, a DVD opera by Monteverdi, and a bottle of Tiparos nam pla, all in one package delivered to my door by the US Postal Service.
21 Comments 89 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Pages with Related Products. See and discover other items: texas food

Disclaimer: While we work to ensure that product information is correct, on occasion manufacturers may alter their ingredient lists. Actual product packaging and materials may contain more and/or different information than that shown on our Web site. We recommend that you do not solely rely on the information presented and that you always read labels, warnings, and directions before using or consuming a product. For additional information about a product, please contact the manufacturer. Content on this site is for reference purposes and is not intended to substitute for advice given by a physician, pharmacist, or other licensed health-care professional. You should not use this information as self-diagnosis or for treating a health problem or disease. Contact your health-care provider immediately if you suspect that you have a medical problem. Information and statements regarding dietary supplements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease or health condition. Amazon.com assumes no liability for inaccuracies or misstatements about products.