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298 of 321 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "...I'm Sorry I Didn't Build You A Better Ship Rose..." - TITANIC in 3D
*** THIS REVIEW IS FOR THE "TITANIC in 3D" MOVIE on BLU RAY ***

Holidaying in Ireland, I happened on the preview day of James Cameron's "Titanic in 3D" at the new Odeon Cinema in The Point Area of Dublin's refurbished docklands (or "The Quays" as they're known locally). We caught the first showing on 5 April 2012 - debuting on their all-bells-and-whistles...
Published on April 7, 2012 by Mark Barry

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63 of 84 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Excellent movie, disappointed over the DVD.
Don't get me wrong, I love TITANIC but I found it odd how the disc transfer was only limited to the bare bones! A theatrical trailer, that's it! Come on! This is the most expensive movie, highest grossing movie, most critically acclaimed, and most award-winning movie an there are zero extras? Cameron's other films are fully loaded. TITANIC gets the shaft while lesser...
Published on May 19, 2002 by Matthew Paul


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298 of 321 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "...I'm Sorry I Didn't Build You A Better Ship Rose..." - TITANIC in 3D, April 7, 2012
*** THIS REVIEW IS FOR THE "TITANIC in 3D" MOVIE on BLU RAY ***

Holidaying in Ireland, I happened on the preview day of James Cameron's "Titanic in 3D" at the new Odeon Cinema in The Point Area of Dublin's refurbished docklands (or "The Quays" as they're known locally). We caught the first showing on 5 April 2012 - debuting on their all-bells-and-whistles "iSense Screen". "iSense" features razor sharp Real-3D imaging on a gigantic screen with state-of-the-art surround sound. So myself and the two kids popped along - donned the crazy specs - and started to watch. The sheer spectacle of what came next has prompted me to write this review...

I've seen about 10 films in 3D - some like "Despicable Me" have impressed and actually met the hype - the rest have either felt gimmicky or a downright hindrance - or worse a crass monetary exploitation. Even the new Aardman Animation feature film "The Pirates..." - which we'd seen some days earlier - is not great in 3D (although it's a top movie and thoroughly recommended). But Cameron's complete reshaping of "Titanic" into a 3D realm is a different beast. It's incredible and at times I was genuinely gobsmacked. I saw the film on its original outing in 1997 (which was a cinematic experience to say the least) and I'd estimate that 65 to 75% of this version has been improved by the 3D process with the remaining portions varying between not changed at all or just slightly better - but definitely better.

So what's changed? Scenes that were somehow 'ordinary' before are now 'dimensional' - at times you feel you could reach out and actually touch them...

Examples - the front railings of the sunken liner at the bottom of the Atlantic at the beginning of the film, the unmanned sub that is filming it then making its way through the insides of the wreck - you now feel the machine and its cables - the space around it - the bubbling of the water - the barnacles and silt disturbed to the left and right. When the engine room ship-sized pistons kick into gear as the last boilers are lit - their size and power; the drinks glasses on the table at dinner as Bruce Ismay pompously tells of how he arrived at the ship's name - they have space around them and you feel you could almost lift them off the tablecloths. Even something as unassuming as Molly Brown's decorative hat as she talks to Jack (at a later dinner table setting) now reaches out of the screen into the aisles with extraordinary depth. Winslet's costumes are glorious too - her radiant eyes and lustrous hair. The feeling of sea air and wind on the ship's gangways when Rose and Jack walk and talk and discuss art is accentuated - more realistic.

But if I was to note just one scene that sums up how improved this version is - it would be the one where Rose tries to kill herself by jumping off the back of the ship. As she steps over the railings and the camera looks down at the cold wash below - suddenly the distance and the hugeness of the ship becomes 'real' - looking downward and with that added depth - you can 'feel' that fall...that freezing water below...

The sound is huge too - groaning steel - creaking wood - the water crashing out of the screen right into your face as it floods corridors...

There were occasions where 3D didn't work - where the effect was detrimental rather than an enhancement - the boarding of the great ship at Southampton was one scene where too much was going on in the crowd sequences for the 3D to catch up. Other offences would be that one character on screen would be razor-sharp image-wise (usually the one talking) - while those beside them or to the left of them - would be slightly blurred. But these were rare.

What you also forget is what an incredible movie "Titanic" is. Like that other maverick filmmaker Ridley Scott ("Blade Runner", "Gladiator" and "The Kingdom Of Heaven") - James Cameron isn't afraid of spectacle - he embraces it. He brings it to the screen with bravado and a passion for 'detail' that few have matched. His new 3D rendering of "Titanic" is the same - it seems like he's worked everything to give you the viewer as much as possible - or at least more than you saw the last time. And when the actual sinking finally comes in the early hours of 15 April 1912 - the horror and heartbreak still has the power to make your heart race and bring a tear to the eye. Captain Smith holding the wheel as the ocean crashes through the glass into the bridge area, the ship's funnel that breaks loose and collapses on the bodies below, the propellers rising out of the water, bodies bouncing off the ship's steel structures as the huge hull rises up and they slide downwards to their death - the camera panning back as Rose emerges from the swell to an ocean of bodies flaying about in the agony of the icy Atlantic - the guilty faces on the lucky ones in the boats that got away - hearing their screams and cries for help - yet not going back for survivors - and knowing they should...

Cameron's version of the sad tale has heart too - through all that technical excellence it doesn't forget to show - and somehow respect - the human cost. There's the rage and helplessness of the third class passengers locked into steerage below while the 'quality' on the decks above get the 'priority' placing in the lifeboats their tickets paid for - the band unselfishly playing "Nearer My God To Thee" as the ship goes down by the head, the priest praying with terrified passengers trying to give them strength, the elderly couple holding each other tightly on the bed as the sea floods their cabin - the Irish mum telling her two children of 'Tir na N'Og' - the mythical 'land of the young' as the inevitable closes in around her beloved...

Then of course there's the cast - Bill Paxton as the obsessed present-day treasure-seeker, Gloria Stuart as the elderly Rose recounting the tragedy to an enrapt crew, Jonathan Hyde as Bruce Ismay - the White Star Line egotist who ordered the number of lifeboats to be reduced from 48 to 16 (compliant with Board of Trade laws at the time) so as not to clutter up the promenade decks for the first-class passengers - and then once onboard practically ordering Captain Smith to open all engines to full speed ahead despite the danger (only to save himself in one of the last lifeboats - an act infamous now in history). Frances Fisher is Rose's social-climbing mum, Billy Zane as Rose's manipulative and jealous boor of a fiancé, David Warner as his dastardly man-servant, Bernard Hill as the overwhelmed and ill-fated Captain Smith, 'new money' Kathy Bates as the 'unsinkable' Molly Brown - all of them exemplary. Victor Garber adds huge gravitas too as the ship's architect Thomas Andrews - a decent man grappling with his thoughts as it all falls apart around him (his dialogue titles this review).

But the movie belongs to its two young leads - Leonardo DiCaprio and Kate Winslet as Jack and Rose - a 17-year-old lady of art and means who falls in love with a 20-year old street-rat who paints to survive. While DiCaprio is good and couldn't go anywhere for a few years due to screaming girls (he was 22 at the time) - it's Winslet who impresses the most. She is sensational in the role - voluptuous, ballsy and humane. She also exudes an acting confidence that is staggering for a 21-year-old. In my book only Kiera Knightley gets this close to that kind of inner belief.

With regard to the 3D Film on BLU RAY (Sept 2012) - it arrives in multiple versions - a 2D Standard Blu Ray set, this 4-disc 3D version and a DELUXE BOX SET with memorabilia. There are 6 hours of extras, over 25 deleted scenes and endless in-depth interviews. It's a feast of detail. And there's also no doubt in my mind that Cameron has given '3D' a huge boost with this extraordinary rendering of his 1997 classic...

To sum up - even if you don't want to see this film again - and suffer through that dreadful Celine Dion schlock song at the end - think of James Cameron's "Titanic in 3D" as sheer cinematic spectacle. My kids are 18 and 14 - and given that their generation is so easily bored and their timespan for attention virtually nil - they didn't notice the three-hours-plus playing time go by. In fact my son Sean announced at the end "...that was a great film Dad...really good." I could see it in his young face - he was genuinely moved by what he'd just seen.

Praise indeed.
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67 of 73 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars 3D and Blu Ray quality, September 11, 2012
We all know the story so my review is for the quality of the blu ray (image quality) and 3D. The quality of the image is very impressive. The colors are vivid, a lot of contrast, very clear picture. It's hard to believe that this movie was converted from 2D to 3D because the 3D effect is one of the best I've ever seen. There was no noticeable ghosting. I had seen the 3D version of this movie in the theatre and thought it was good. However, it is even more impressive on my 3D TV (47 inch LG). The characters often appear to be with me in the room, they pop out of the screen. There is a lot of depth throughout the movie, which is also visable in darker scenes. The picture is amazing. You get the feeling that you are in the movie...when the boat sinks, you feel as if you're part of the action. I was very impressed with the quality of the 3D. I would recommend this to anyone who owns a 3D TV...worth every penny!
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260 of 313 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars FINALLY..... THE DVD TREATMENT TITANIC ALWAYS DESERVED!!!, August 31, 2005
By 
Mohd Jafar (Hyderabad, AP India) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Finally, the most successful film in the film history gets the dvd treatment it deserves, bringing much respite to the fans all the over the world. Previously available barebones edition dvd has been replaced with a 3disc collector's edition dvd set, loaded with all those great never before seen stuff.

Here's what one can look forward to in this edition:

New high definition digital transfer with the main feature spread over two discs to get the highest possible picture and sound quality...and thankfully it does include DTS6.1 ES track!!!

Never before seen footage (approximately 58 minutes, alongwith the main film but it will be available through branching option on the disc unlike LOTR EXTENDED editions!!)

All-new making-of featurettes which will include time lapse footage of the massive set and studio construction.

Incredible Alternate Ending - "Brock's Epiphany"

29 Never-Before-Seen Deleted Scenes with Optional Commentary which include romantic moments between jack and rose and historical and action shots as well!!

Commentary by Academy Award-Winning Director James Cameron

Cast and Crew Commentaries by Stars Kate Winslet and Gloria Stuart and Oscar-Winning Producer Jon Landau and Executive Producer Rae Sanchini

Historical Commentary

Visual Effects Breakdown of the Unforgettable Stunts

Music Video "My Heart Will Go On" by Celine Dion

...and much more!!

Titanic collector's edition is a dream come true not just for all those titanic fans out there but it will be a jewel in any dvd collection!!

AND LAST BUT DEFINITELY NOT THE LEAST.......if you own a multi-region dvd player or watch dvds from all regions on your DVD ROM, then you have an option of buying from amazon UK where you can choose between the two disc and the four disc set!!
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435 of 543 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars TITANIC SPECIAL COLLECTOR'S EDITION, September 11, 2005
By 
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Having garnered 11 Academy Awards in 1998, a reported production budget of over US$200 million (thus making news headlines in 1997) and earning over US$1 billion in box-office receipts worldwide (quite a percentage of those are due to repeated theatrical viewings), Titanic (1997) has finally been given the enhanced DVD edition many have been looking for.

Having "suffered" a mediocre vanilla (single) DVD release in 1999, the title has finally been given better treatment (better film-to-video transfer and extensive bonus materials) by Paramount Home Entertainment for Region 1 or regions using the NTSC video system and Twentieth Century Fox Home Entertainment (Other regions or regions using the PAL video system) before 2005 ends.

Paramount Home Entertainment will be releasing a single 3-disc Special Collector's Edition (SCE) for Region 1 (US) whilst Twentieth Century Fox Home Entertainment will be releasing 2 editions: 2-disc Special Edition (SE) and 4-disc Deluxe/Definitive Collector's Edition (DCE) for the international markets.

On Disc 1 & 2 of 2-disc SE (R2/R4), 3-disc SCE (R1) and 4-disc DCE (R2/R4)

The feature film Titanic (1997) will be split onto first 2 discs (as per LOTR Special Extended Edition sets) when the enhanced DVD edition is release during the months of Oct - Dec 05 worldwide due to the limitation of the DVD format.

For all editions of all regions, the feature film (HD transfer) is presented in 16 x 9 Anamorphic Widescreen (2.35 : 1) with the usual Dolby Digital Surround EX 5.1 soundtrack, there is also the DTS-ES 6.1 soundtrack included. Hopefully, the part of the feature film on the first disc ends on the appropriate scene for a short toilet/snack break.

The bonus materials included in the first 2 discs of the DVD set (Applicable for all regions) are listed as follows:

3 AUDIO COMMENTARIES WITH
DIRECTOR, JAMES CAMERON (Run Time 194m 46s)
CAST (Kate Winslet & Gloria Stuart) AND CREW (Producer Jon Landau and Executive Producer Rae Sanchini) (Run Time 153m 47s)
HISTORICAL LOOK ON TITANIC BY DON LYNCH & KEN MARSCHALL (Run Time 194 min 46s)
BEHIND THE SCENES FOOTAGE VIA BRANCHING (Run Time 62m 16s) / Spread over first 2 feature discs.
POD 01 - DEEP DIVE
POD 02 - UPSIDE-DOWN - WRECK MINIATURE
POD 03 - ESCONDIDO UNDERWATER SET
POD 04 - TWO ROSES
POD 05 - SINKING SIMULATION
POD 06 - 1912 - MORPH TRANSITION VFX
POD 07 - SOUTHAMPTON FLOP
POD 08 - A VIEW FROM THE PUB VFX
POD 09 - LEAVING PORT VFX
POD 10 - MELTING POT
POD 11 - THE MILLIONAIRE'S SUITE
POD 12 - THE ENGINE ROOM
POD 13 - TITANIC AT SEA
POD 14 - DIGITAL PEOPLE
POD 15 - THE MILLION DOLLAR SHOT
POD 16 - THE BIG EXTERIOR SHIP SET
POD 17 - ROSE SUICIDE
POD 18 - BIG SHIP SET VFX
POD 19 - TUX STORY
POD 20 - THE GRAND STAIRCASE
POD 21 - COSTUME DESIGN
POD 22 - FIRST CLASS DINING ROOM
POD 23 - DINNER SHOOT
POD 24 - THIRD CLASS PARTY
POD 25 - A WOMAN'S PLACE
POD 26 - THE ETIQUETTE KID
POD 27 - THE BOILER ROOM
POD 28 - FLOODING HOLD MINIATURE
POD 29 - ICEBERG/DECK VFX
POD 30 - BOILER ROOM FLOODING
POD 31 - FIRST CLASS LOUNGE MINIATURE
POD 32 - SHOOTING IN STEERAGE
POD 33 - KATE'S ACTION COSTUME
POD 34 - CRANE AS HELICOPTER
POD 35 - LIFEBOATS 13 & 15
POD 36 - FLOODED FIRST CLASS DINING ROOM
POD 37 - STAGE 2 SINKING SET
POD 38 - FAKING A TILT
POD 39 - THE SINKING RISER
POD 40 - SHIP EXTENSIONS
POD 41 - FALLING FUNNEL
POD 42 - GRAND STAIRCASE FLOODING
POD 43 - MINIATURE HALL FLOODING
POD 44 - JUMPING STUNTS
POD 45 - TILTING POOP DECK
POD 46 - DECK SLIDERS
POD 47 - DIGITAL STUNT PEOPLE
POD 48 - SINKING VIDEOMATIC
POD 49 - SHIP SPLIT MINIATURE
POD 50 - VERTICAL POOP DECK STUNTS
POD 51 - THE TOILET PAPER SHOT
POD 52 - FINAL PLUNGE VFX
POD 53 - UNDERWATER GREENSCREEN
POD 54 - INTERIOR TANK SHOOT
POD 55 - BREATH SHOTS
POD 56 - EXTERIOR TANK SHOOT
POD 57 - ICE MAKEUP
POD 58 - OPEN LIFEBOATS AND THE CARPATHIA
POD 59 - CARPATHIA MEDAL
POD 60 - THE FINAL SHOT
POD 61 - MAKING THE MUSIC VIDEO
MY HEART WILL GO ON MUSIC VIDEO (Run Time 4m 42s)
ALTERNATE ENDING "BROCK'S EPIPHANY" WITH OPTIONAL COMMENTARY BY JAMES CAMERON (Run Time 9m 15s)

Bonus Materials on Disc 3 (R1) and Disc 3 or 4 (R2/R4)

29 DELETED SCENES (COMPLETE SCENES WITH FINISHED EFFECTS) WITH OPTIONAL AUDIO COMMENTARY (Run Time 45m 57s)
#1 - I'LL BE THE FIRST
#2 - ROSE FEELS TRAPPED
#3 - BROCK'S DILEMMA/ ROSE VISITS THIRD CLASS
#4 - ROSE'S DREAMS
#5 - COME JOSEPHINE...
#6 - EXTENDED SNEAKING TO FIRST CLASS
#7 - EXTENDED ESCAPE FROM LOVEJOY
#8 - A KISS IN THE BOILER ROOM
#9 - WIRELESS ROOM/ THE CALIFORNIAN
#10 - HOW 'BOUT A LITTLE ICE?
#11 - FLIRTING WITH ICE
#12 - THE FIRST S.O.S.
#13 - ISMAY PANICS
#14 - MOLLY BROWN'S ROWING SCHOOL
#15 - IRISH HOSPITALITY
#16 - IDA STRAUS WON'T LEAVE
#17 - FAREWELL TO HELGA
#18 - BOAT SIX WON'T RETURN
#19 - RELEASE THE HOUNDS
#20 - ROSE GETS A HUSBAND'S LETTER
#21 - JACK AND LOVEJOY FIGHT
#22 - GUGGENHEIM AND ASTOR
#23 - I'M NOT GOING
#24 - CORA'S FATE
#25 - EXTENDED JACK AND ROSE IN THE WATER
#26 - OUT OF THE QUESTION
#27 - HOW DARE YOU!
#28 - CHINESE MAN RESCUE
#29 - EXTENDED CARPATHIA SEQUENCE
1912 NEWS REEL WITH OPTIONAL COMMENTARY BY ED MARSH (Run Time 2m 11s)
CONSTRUCTION TIMELAPSE SEQUENCE WITH OPTIONAL COMMENTARY BY ED MARSH (Run Time 4m 19s)
DEEP DIVE PRESENTATION NARRATED - BY JAMES CAMERON (Run Time 15m 29s )
TITANIC CREW VIDEO (Run Time 17m 26s)
A SHIP'S ODYSSEY (THE TITANIC CREW VIDEO)
SHIP'S TOUR MONTAGE WITH OPTIONAL COMMENTARY BY ANDERS FALK (Run Time 7m 33s)
VIDEOMATICS AND VFX (Run Time 8m 38s)
VIDEOMATICS INTRODUCTION
SINKING SEQUENCE
DEEP DIVE
VFX SHOT BREAKDOWN: "ENGINE ROOM"
VFX HOW-TO FOR "I'M FLYING"
VFX HOW-TO FOR "FIRST CLASS LOUNGE"
TITANIC SINKING SIMULATION
STILL GALLERIES
TITANIC SCRIPTMENT
STORYBOARD SEQUENCES
PRODUCTION ARTWORK
PHOTOGRAPHS
KEN MARSCHALL'S PAINTING GALLERY
BY THE NUMBERS
BIBILOGRAPHY
BREAKING NEW GROUND - THE MAKING OF TITANIC TV Special (Run Time 42m 50s)
TITANIC FEATURETTES - ELETRONIC PRESS KIT (Run Time 18m 10s)
NEWSPOD #1: STORY FOCUS
NEWSPOD #2: ACTOR FOCUS
NEWSPOD #3: BUILDING THE SHIP
NEWSPOD #4: POPULATING THE SHIP
NEWSPOD #5: SINKING THE SHIP
NEWSPOD #6: JAMES CAMERON FOCUS
NEWSPOD #7: DEEP DIVE FOCUS
CONCEPT POSTERS AND ONE SHEETS

Bonus Materials Exclusive to 4-Disc (R2/R4) Release - Not Applicable for Region 1 Release

HBO FIRST LOOK THE HEART OF THE OCEAN (Run Time 27m 30s)
TITANIC IN 30 SECONDS WITH BUNNIES (Run Time 0m 47s)
MTV MOVIE AWARDS TITANIC SKIT (Run Time 4m 21s)
TITANIC (1997) S.E. - EASTER EGG - SNL SKIT WITH BILL PAXTON AND JAMES CAMERON (Run Time 4m 47s)
TRAILERS & TEASERS IN WIDESCREEN OR FULL FRAME (Approximately 25 minutes)
TITANIC TV SPOTS IN FULL FRAME (Run Time 5m 26s)
DESTINY
OPPOSITE WORLDS
KNOW THE LEGEND
NOTHING YOU EXPECT
HEART WILL GO ON
SEE IT AGAIN:15
HONORED
TITANIC - SINKING SIMMULATION
RTLT TV SPOT - GERMAN

SOUND QUALITY
2-DISC SET - 2.0 / 5.1 / 6.1 DOLBY DIGITAL SURROUND SOUND WITH DTS
3-DISC SET - 2.0 / 5.1 / 6.1 DOLBY DIGITAL SURROUND SOUND WITH DTS
4-DISC SET - 2.0 / 5.1 / 6.1 DOLBY DIGITAL SURROUND SOUND WITH DTS

PICTURE QUALITY
2-DISC SET - WIDESCREEN ANAMORPHIC 2.35:1
3-DISC SET - WIDESCREEN ANAMORPHIC 2.35:1
4-DISC SET - WIDESCREEN ANAMORPHIC 2.35:1
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45 of 57 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Titanic - A truly glorious film!, February 13, 2004
By 
K. Wyatt "ssintrepid" (Cape Girardeau, MO United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Titanic (DVD)
If this incredible films winning of eleven Academy awards including Best Picture and Best director and being the highest grossing film of all time doesn't speak for itself I don't know what else would. "Titanic" is quite simply one of the best tales of a true life tragedy interspersed with a fictional love story ever made, all of which combines to make director James Cameron appear a true genius which in terms of being a film director he is. Only one note of caution need be applied to watching this film on DVD and that is to know where the pause button is on your DVD player when considering the three hour length of the film.
I will freely admit that I'm not a big Leonardo DiCaprio fan but when it comes to this film he did an exceptional job in the role of Jack. Instrumental in the success of this film, beyond the exceptional script, is the performance given by the ever beautiful Kate Winslet in the role of Rose. Noteworthy are the performances given by the supporting cast to include the likes of David Warner, Kathy Bates and Billy Zane and of course a couple of James Cameron's staple actors who crop up in almost all of his films in Bill Paxton and Jenette Goldstein.
As testimony to the brilliance of director James Cameron one only needs to take a look at his list of directorial and script credits which includes; "The Terminator," "Aliens," "The Abyss," "T2: Judgment Day," "True Lies" and "Titanic." With a list such as this one James Cameron has most certainly gone down in history as one of the most successful directors/screen writers in history and deservedly so. It would be nice to see him take a break from television and take up the film directing mantle once again as one can almost call it a sure bet film when he's in the director's chair.
The Premise:
On April 14th, 1912 one of western civilization's most tragic events occurred when a ship thought to be unsinkable did exactly that, struck an iceberg and sank killing hundreds of passengers in the process as the ships builders seemed to have made one mistake after another in the construction of this "magnificent" vessel.
Director/screen writer James Cameron concocts a glorious love story around this true life tragedy and quite poignantly portrays the disparity of classes aboard the vessel as the first class passengers live in the lap of luxury even during the "abandonment" of the vessel while the poor are treated with palpable disdain to include being locked below decks after the ship begins to sink.
While the true story of this movie is the sinking of the ship told through Cameron's brilliant writing and direction there is whole myriad of other things going on that are not noticeable but would've been had they been done incorrectly, chief among these are the costumes and the sets of the Titanic.
The truly fictitious portion of this tragedy is told through Rose Dawson Calvert (Gloria Stuart) as she regales present day treasure hunters of her time on the Titanic and the gloriously passionate but brief love affair between her and Jack Dawson who was a free spirited artist who taught her how to live despite his destiny...
I highly recommend this film to any and all who are fans of what movie making is all about! {ssintrepid}
Special Features:
-Theatrical Trailer
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I'll Never Forget..., July 6, 2006
This review is from: Titanic (DVD)
Ah, what can be said about `Titanic' that hasn't already been said? What possible input could I have to offer that you haven't already heard? I doubt much, but I'm going to give you my opinion anyways, basically because I've been wanting to write this review for months now, and it wasn't until five or six minutes ago, when the credits got finished rolling that it all came to me...what I needed to say.

`Titanic' has already been cemented in the history books as one of cinemas finest accomplishments, hailed by critic after critic as the best disaster film ever released, and even further, one of the greatest films ever...period. `Titanic', even after all the hype, truly lives up to it's name and is deserving of every ounce of credit and attention it receives, and yes, despite what many believe and contrary to all the `LA Confidential' fans (I being one of them) `Titanic' truly deserved to win the crown. (I just wish it could have been a tie, I mean, `LA Confidential' is just as magnificent...)

Now, I truly believe that `Titanic' won for one reason and one reason only, and no it's not because of all the so-called `undue' attention or `over' praise. I believe `Titanic' won because it struck a chord with modern day America, much like the recent `Brokeback Mountain' (although `BBM' didn't fair as well at the Oscars). Watching `Titanic' for what must have been the hundredth time I realized something throughout that I wasn't privy too before, or at least didn't take the time to notice. `Titanic' is less about a ship sinking then it is about a woman being set free from the chains that are binding her to a sinking ship (that ship being her life, not the literal sinking Titanic). I mean, it's something I've always known and I assume everyone who has ever seen `Titanic' (which is pretty much everyone) has known, but it wasn't until tonight that it really sunk in. Like Bill Paxton's character states towards the end of the film... "For three years I've thought of nothing but Titanic, but I never got it." That's how I felt tonight. I've seen this movie plenty of times since it's release but it was tonight, staring into Rose's eyes that I truly got what this movie was all about.

The love story between Rose (Kate Winslet...just breathtaking) and Jack Dawson (Leonardo DiCaprio) is just a sideline, just a plot to keep you watching, but it's the growth that Rose's character undergoes, the release sort-of-speak that she encounters that really is the base of this extraordinary film. Rose is a woman trapped in a life she wishes to be no part of, a life that she never asked for yet was forced upon her by her overbearing mother and her controlling and manipulative fiancée (Billy Zane in a commanding and Oscar snubbed performance).

As everyone is aware, this film revolves around Rose and Jack as they live out an ill-fated love affair for a few days, defying all odds to be with one another, and as Jack sinks to the bottom of the ocean your left with a feeling of contentment, for even though Rose is losing the only man she's ever loved you know she has gained more in the past few days then she'll ever gain in her lifetime. She gained happiness and the will to move on. You can read this in her face. There are two scenes in particular when you see this transformation in Rose.

The first is when the boat is sinking and the lovers are at the back of the ship. They have yet to climb over the railing and Rose is looking to each side of her. She glances to her right and she sees a young woman gripping the railing for dear life and she's all alone. Rose looks up at Jack and then back to the woman. You can see in her face, Rose's face, that she knows she has everything she needs with her at that very moment. She has no need for anything else, and you can see this growing pity for the young girl, there all alone, for she has no strength to survive when you have no one to live for. Rose has a reason to hold on.

The second is after the boat has sunk, when Rose first realizes Jack has died. After the initial shock is over and she has stopped repeating his name she lays her head on his hand and closes her eyes, catching her breath, and as you can only imagine, contemplates whether she really wants to be rescued. Why should she live without the man she loves? But before the thought can fully cross her mind her eyes are open and you can see this conviction, this dire motivation to live. Jack gave her the strength and the reason to live, with or without him. He showed her that she doesn't have to be trapped; she doesn't have to be what they (her mother and her fiancée or anyone really) want her to be. She is her own person, and as we realized the moment she jumped from the lifeboat back into the sinking ship, Rose has taken hold of the life she should have never let go of in the first place.

Everyone gets so wrapped up in the fact that Jack dies that they forget this isn't about loss as much as it is about life. As Rose states at the end of the film... "Jack saved me, in everyway a person can be saved." A friend of mine told me that she hates this film for the reason that the love affair between Jack and Rose is unbelievable. She said that there's no way that these two could have fallen in love. I told her she missed the point, and that she did! Regardless of whether or not Rose `loved' Jack, he was her everything because he was the only one who `gave' her anything. Everyone around this poor girl was taking advantage of her, using her for their own personal gain, but Jack was the first person who ever saw her for who she was and looked for ways to make her happy, to `do' for her and not take away.

Rose loved Jack for setting her free. It's up to the viewer to decide whether or not these two were truly in love, but I think it's foolish to believe that these two weren't in one way or another more than just lovers. I personally feel they truly loved one another, for when Jack says, "winning that ticket was the best thing that ever happened to me" you believe him for you know he's right. But more so than loving him, she needed him, and that's a key point to remember.

`Titanic' will always be remembered as cinematic genius, but lets not forget the reason we love this film so much. `Titanic' showed us so much more than a sinking ship, and gave us so much more than a glimpse at the terror of that fateful night. It gave us inspiration to live, reason to find meaning in our lives and live each day as if it were our last. As Rose toasts to her dinner mates... "Here's to making it count" and that's the point isn't it.

As the final frames of this film roll on we see a desk cluttered with pictures of young Rose making it count, doing everything that Jack inspired her to do. She no longer lived her life controlled and afraid but she put caution to the wind and lived, plain and simple. I want to take a moment and mention that this film would have been nothing had the beautifully talented Kate Winslet not been a part of it. She embodied her character and proved to be the lifeblood of this beautiful and heart wrenching film. With just her eyes and the slightest movement in her face she creates a feeling and tells a story that all can read, a story of a young woman afraid of everything, a young woman that finally learned to love, to live and to fly (cut to corniest part of the film for visual effect... "I'm flying!").

I'm sorry Helen, but Kate deserved that Oscar...hands down!
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19 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Second Time Around Better, April 17, 2012
I saw the 3D version of this film over the weekend. The first time I saw this film, I liked it a lot but admittedly I spent too much time focusing on special effects and the general razzle dazzle of an enormous spectacle.
This time around gave me the opportunity to just watch the movie. I, like a lot of people, have recently been immersed (or drowning) in Titanic related books, DVDs, and television programs. Overall, I've learned quite a bit. The one thing that has come out of all of this is just how good a film this is. I'd label this movie's genre historical fiction. James Cameron threw in the subplot of the Rose De Witt Butaker and Jack Dawson romance to get this film made, but the real star is the Titanic. Everything about the ship's first and only voyage and its descent into temporary oblivion is not only well done but done in exacting detail given what was known in 1997 when this movie was made. The real passengers and crew are portrayed with accuracy and the Rose/Jack story slides into this mosaic seamlessly.
As for the 3D process, I really didn't know what to expect. I had heard some negative comments which were not specific. I thought the criticism might be comparable to what was said about colorization when b&w movies were being altered from their original format. That was an idea that came and went because the technology was poor at best and it was distracting. The 3D aspect of Titanic works. It isn't jarring or gimmicky or a grossly imperfect technology; strange objects such as the bow of the Titanic don't shoot out at you. There is no freak show here. The technology, which I have to assume is not only costly but time consuming, enhances a really nice photography job by adding depth and dimension. Clearly if you are a movie purist and don't like tweaking you won't want to see Titanic 3D. I'm o.k. with the enhancement and think Cameron & his people made a very well done movie even better.
Overall, this was a great viewing experience and was the 3D enhancement was not distracting as far as I am concerned. I enjoyed the opportunity to pay attention to a the wonderful small details I missed the first time around and am pleased to see this being introduced to a new generation of movie viewers.
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27 of 34 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars HERE'S WHAT TO LOOK FOR...........!!!!!!, August 18, 2005
By 
Mohd Jafar (Hyderabad, AP India) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
come october, the most successful film in the film history will finally get the dvd treatment it deserves, bringing much respite to the fans all the over the world. the presently available barebones edition will be replaced with a 3disc deluxe edition dvd loaded with all those great never before seen stuff. previous announcements by fox suggested two dvd releases of titanic. one being a two disc set and another 4 disc release with fourth disc being the soundtrack of the film but now there will be just one 3disc edition release, without the soundtrack.

here's what one can look forward to in this edition:

New high definition digital transfer with the main feature spread over two discs to get the highest possible picture and sound quality.

Never before seen footage (approximately 58 minutes, alongwith the main film but it will be available through branching option on the disc unlike LOTR EXTENDED editions!!)

All-new making-of documentary "heart of the ocean", which will include time lapse footage of the massive set and studio construction.

Incredible Alternate Ending - "Brock's Epiphany"

29 Never-Before-Seen Deleted Scenes with Optional Commentary which include romantic moments between jack and rose and historical and action shots as well!!

Commentary by Academy Award-Winning Director James Cameron

Cast and Crew Commentaries by Stars Kate Winslet and Gloria Stuart and Oscar-Winning Producer Jon Landau and Executive Producer Rae Sanchini

Historical Commentary

Visual Effects Breakdown of the Unforgettable Stunts

Music Video "My Heart Will Go On" by Celine Dion

...and much more!!

titanic deluxe edition will be a dream come true not just for all those titanic fans out there but it will definitely be a jewel in any dvd collection!!
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24 of 30 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Those who can do and those who can't criticize, June 29, 2005
By 
This review is from: Titanic [VHS] (VHS Tape)
I can think of a ton of movies that are trashy, overhyped and overrated and James Cameron's "Titanic" is *not* one of them.

Sure, everyone is entitled to their opinion but the folks criticizing this movie so vehemently usually have the attention span of a flea. And if they did sit down long enough to watch the entire movie, they just don't get the history of it.

If Cameron had decided to make the movie strictly as a documentary, it would have been called "boring." Since he attempted to make it interesting by centering the history of the disaster around a fictional love story, it's called "trashy." No, you can't win any which way you look at it so you make the movie in a way that's going to make money - and Cameron's formula worked...and then some.

I liked this movie not because of the love story (and, yes, I'm one of those saps who can't help but cry as Rose lets Jack go after the ship has sunk and he disappears into the freezing darkness of the Atlantic) but because of the attention that was paid to the actual sinking. It makes you think if some of what was shown did happen on that frosty night in April of 1912. Had the action been cut off and the ship sunk in less than five minutes, the movie would have lost all credibility.

Two thumbs up for the historical accuracy. The only bad things about this movie were that Leonardo Di Caprio and Kate Winslet were not nominated for Oscars for their performances.
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15 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Classy presentation, October 25, 2005
It's 1996 and James Cameron's new film is in trouble. Facing titanic production set backs, on set disasters (such as food laced with PCP fed to the production crew by a disgruntled employee), Cameron's film which is relying on state-of-the-art digital effects to bring the epic story to life keeps edging over budget and running behind. The film surprisingly wins an Academy Award for Best Picture among a slew of other awards, faces a critical drubbing in the press and manages to become one of the highest grossing films of all time. When "Titanic" was first announced the two studios releasing the film 20th Century Fox and Paramount both knew that they had a monumental project that might make bucket loads of money. They also knew given Cameron's reputation as a perfectionist it wasn't going to be an easy shoot. Still with an appealing cast, epic story chronicling the sinking of the unsinkable luxury liner R.M.S. Titanic in 1912 it seemed worth the gamble. "Titanic" may have been the most expensive movie ever made up to that time (rumor varies as to the final cost of the film and Fox has been mum on the final cost) but it also became the blockbuster of the year. While this isn't quite the definitive edition fans were hoping for, it's about as close as were likely to get until the film shows up on the HD DVD format or Blu-Ray.
***
Told in flashback "Titanic" begins by chronicling the attempt of treasure hunter Brock Lovett (Bill Paxton) trying to find the wreckage of the luxury liner. On board at the time was the stunning Hope diamond a priceless piece of jewelry that has been missing since the ship went down. As Lovett's salvage operation is televised he's contacted by a woman named Rose (Gloria Stuart) who claims to be a survivor of the disaster and also to know the whereabouts of the strand of jewelry the diamond was set in. Skeptical at first, Rose tells Brock and his crew about the journey and her shipboard romance with starving artist Jack Dawson (Leonardo DiCaprio). The itinerant Dawson wins two tickets on the luxury liner in a card game and looks forward to returning to America after years abroad. When Dawson meets socialite Rose De Witt Bukater (Kate Winslet) his world and hers is turned upside down when they fall in love on the voyage. There are two problems; the first is Rose's wealthy fiancé Cal Hockley (Billy Zane) a man ruthless, egotistic man that will resort to violence to get what he wants and the fate of the luxury liner itself. When it was launched from England the unique design of the Titanic made it appear unsinkable but when the ship hits an iceberg that rips through the hold of the ship the travelers are in for a horrifying ordeal.

One of the most popular DVD releases back in 1998, "Titanic" has been in need of refurbishing for some time now. Paramount has pulled out all the stops for this release when it comes to the transfer of the film to DVD. Released for the first time in anamorphic widescreen, receives a magnificent transfer here spreading the movie over two discs allowing for as much breathing space for the video and audio as possible. The image quality is exceptional with strong, bright colors and flesh tones that are accurate. The contrast is exceptional and although there is grain noticeable in the image that's to be expected since the original film itself demonstrated grain in its theatrical run. Remember, this was shot before the launch of HD video for movies. While there are some minor issues with edge enhancement they aren't noticeable on most screens and are not a distraction even on when viewed on a 61 inch widescreen TV. "Titanic" provides a visually stunning picture with a state-of-the-art transfer. While I thought this was only on my disc, it appears that there is an endocing flaw that makes a small portion of Di Caprio's face dissolve into pixelated bits on all the first pressings of this DVD.

"Titanic" also offers a wide range of audio options as well. There's an excellent Dolby Digital 2.0 stereo soundtrack as well as an exceptional Dolby Digital 5.1 EX and stunning DTS 6.1 ES soundtrack. While the DTS soundtrack sounds slightly fuller and less clipped than the 5.1 EX soundtrack, they are very, very close in terms of quality. Keep in mind that you won't experience the full wonder of these mixes until the last section of the movie when the disaster occurs. While the format is used well in the early part of the movie most of the effects are limited to ambient sound until the disaster occurs.

Although most of the extras are confined to the third disc there are also quite a few interesting extras on disc 1 and 2 which primarily focus on the movie itself. First, there's an interactive behind-the-scenes option that allows you to view footage from the production of the film. Most of these segments run about a minute or two and you're returned to where you were in the film after they conclude. You can also view these bits separately as well. An alternate ending for the film is provided on the second disc. As Cameron points out in his commentary track (it can be viewed without his comments as well) for the "alternate ending" it's not that at all-it's the ORIGINAL ending for the film. When Cameron was writing the script his focus was to tie together all the strands of the film much as a novelist would but, in the end, he went back and reshot the ending when he realized that it said and showed things that didn't need to be said and shown. We also get the music video for Celine Dion's treacly radio favorite "My Heart Goes On".

Disc 3 features the bulk of the extra material here and while it isn't quite as extensive as the 4 disc set being released in Europe, there's a vast amount of material here. We get a number of featurettes including "A Time Lapse Creation of the `Titanic' Set" with a commentary by Ed Marsh. It's fascinating to watch because even if you have been in film production the scope of the sets build is staggering. Marsh also created a faux 1912 newsreel for the launch of the Titanic and that's included intact and, again, features commentary from Marsh. "Titanic Crew Video" features the actors and crew appearing in what's more or less a gag reel for the movie. Cameron provides commentary on the "Deep Dive" that he did in 1995 for the footage of the real Titanic. It's eerie and fascinating and Cameron's comments are pretty interesting as well. Cameron justified the shoot to Fox by pointing out that to do it in miniature would cost more and the publicity would be worth millions. We get a "Ship Tour" which Anders Falk narrates. The footage was put together for the "Titanic Historical Society Convention" done on the Queen Mary. It's as close as we'll ever discover what it felt light to walk through the actual Titanic. "Visual Effects" provides a breakdown of the shot in the engine room using both miniatures and full scale parts. "I'm Flying" demonstrates how the visual effects were done for the sequence where Rose is at the front of the ship with Jack looking over the water from the edge of the boat. It includes all the individual elements used to make up the sequence including real footage, large scale miniature and digital effects along with the full scale footage shot on a green screen stage. We get to see how the final sequence was put together as well. It's a marvelous example of how the visual effects created the illusion we see in the final footage. "First Class Lounge" was a section of the ship that was flooded. A miniature of the first class lounge was created and shot compositing elements of a green screen shot so that it looked as if the actual stage had been flooded. It's a brilliant and seamless optical. Finally "Titanic Sinking Simulation" takes us through the the various stages of completed CGI that were combined to give the sinking sequence its powerful impact.

"Stills Gallery" includes the "Titanic Scriptment" which allows you to read Cameron's script. "Storyboard Sequences" is designed so you can view the entire gallery or individual sections which include everything from the "Southampton Departure" sequence to the "Final Sinking Sequence" from the film and includes nine sequences in total. "Production Artwork" includes production paintings by Tom Lay, costume design art by David Le Vey and "Wreck Sketches" done by James Cameron. "Photographs" covers the deep dive that Cameron did as well as photos from the model shop and even includes the extras' scrapbook with photos of the extras during production as well as behind-the-scenes photos of the sets. There are over 200 photos included in this section. "Ken Marschall's Painting Gallery" features material that Marschall completed for "Titanic: An Illustrated History" which was done in collaboration with writer Don Lynch. The book provided inspiration for Cameron throughout the writing and research process. These wonderfully detailed collection of 82 paintings clearly inspired Cameron's attention to detail in the film. Finally there's a text section that discusses the international performance of "Titanic" in terms of local currency and how that translates to the US gross of the film. There's even a 72 page bibliography referencing the material that Cameron used to do research and that came out as tie-ins with the movie.

The extensive deleted scenes section includes 29 scenes with Cameron's commentary. The scenes include finished visual effects and music to allow viewers to see how the sequences might have looked if they might have been finished. Cameron chose not to reintegrate them into the film. It's pretty clear why the scenes weren't put into the movie but many still have value and will be appreciated by fans of the movie. The scenes have a "handle", i.e., the sequence that preceded the cut sequence and followed it.

"Marketing" includes the "Fox Special: Breaking New Ground" which was produced as a promotional tie in to the movie. We also get the press kit featurettes which were originally included as part of the Electronic Press Kit (EPK). We also get a 62 page gallery of concept artwork for the posters considered for the film as well as the final ones used to promote the movie. There's also an Easter egg featuring Ben Stiller and Vince Vaughn (much thinner and much younger) as two dim movie executives suggesting that Cameron do a sequel. I believe this played on the "MTV Movie Awards". It's a very funny sequence and can be accessed by clicking down to the main menu and then clicking right.

Cameron's comments cover everything the performances to production trivia and even a bit of history as well including a short discourse on women's rights. Cameron discusses the real vs. reel aspects of the story. Interestingly, Cameron comments that in the sequence where they launch the lifeboats they (meeting the actors and crew) had to figure out how they launched the real ones they were so different from what we have today. The lifeboats included in the film were manufactured by the same company that manufactured the original lifeboats for the R.M.S. Titanic. Packed with trivia and detail, Cameron's commentary track is one of the richest on the disc even though he does his solo. The passengers thought that the lifeboats and life preservers were all part of an elaborate exercise or drill based on Cameron's research. Likewise, he points out that the only person beyond the crew that would know what happened was Thomas Andrews (Victor Garber) who heroically stayed behind on the sinking ship as well as trying to organize and get people off the ship. Surprisingly, carrying a concealed fire arm was not that uncommon. There were a lot of bodies that were discovered with guns on them. Cameron also points out that no one wanted to get off the ship into the boats because the band was still playing and everyone still thought that perhaps it was a drill.

The cast and production crew provide a second audio track. Whenever the speaker changes there is a title telling you who is speaking. Covering everything from the actor's preparation for the film (from reading books about the incident to talking with historians) to production details (producer Jon Landau provides a unique perspective since he is both a producer and a director), it's equally as fascinating as Cameron's track or the one done by the historians. While there is some duplication (how can there not be?) most of the commentary tracks have enough new information to keep each one interesting on its own. Having three commentary tracks might seem like overkill but, well, this is a James Cameron film and Cameron is known for exhaustive detail in both his research and his production of his films.

The third audio commentary track features historians discussing the accuracy of the film and the world in 1912. It's amazing how accurate Cameron's film is. The historians point out that misinformation was rampant and stewards told people to go to bed because the ship probably just dropped a propeller blade. Cameron was worried that the davits that lowered the lifeboats might break during the sequences when they lowered them. The concept of a major sea rescue at the time was unthinkable. If a ship went down, it was thought that most people would die if another ship was too far away to rescue them immediately. Far from the usual dry historical commentaries, it's a wonderfully articulate track.

Although it's missing theatrical trailers, this is a pretty comprehensive boxed set for "Titanic". It's filled with wonderful behind-the-scenes footage, photos, production art, featurettes and commentary tracks. The two disc presentation of the movie has better clarity, remarkable detail and color when compared to the previous single disc edition of the movie. This is one that you'll definitely want if you're a fan of the movie.
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Titanic (Four-Disc Combo: Blu-ray / DVD / Digital Copy)
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