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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Cthulhu Mythos: 1930's Pulp Style
Concerning the Cthulhu Mythos, Brian Lumley is a writer of the August Derleth school. While Lovecraft and others had the total meaninglessness of the universe as their cosmological base, Derleth wrote the Mythos as a battle between good and evil between ultimate forces. Lumley takes this further, stripping the Mythos of its supernatural aspects and putting it solidly into...
Published on May 8, 2002 by Craig Alan Loewen

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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars It took an effort of will to finish the whole thing
I'm a big enough fan of Lovecraft, especially his Dreamlands stories, that I found the first half mildly entertaining. Mostly for the ways that Lumley extends, changes, and explains various aspects of the dreamlands. It's not as much fun as the Dreamlands novels that Lumley wrote about Hero and Eldin, because, well, the protaganists are somewhat stuffy and dull. Also,...
Published on February 19, 2004 by Jeremy York


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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Cthulhu Mythos: 1930's Pulp Style, May 8, 2002
Concerning the Cthulhu Mythos, Brian Lumley is a writer of the August Derleth school. While Lovecraft and others had the total meaninglessness of the universe as their cosmological base, Derleth wrote the Mythos as a battle between good and evil between ultimate forces. Lumley takes this further, stripping the Mythos of its supernatural aspects and putting it solidly into the realm of science fiction. What were supernatural aspects of the mythos stories are now an alien science as the forces of good personified in the Elder Gods struggle with mankind to keep the evil beings of the Cthulhu Mythos trapped within their eternal prisons and foil the attempts of those who would release them.
Lumley's style is also reminiscent of the pulp genre popular in the 1930's with black-and-white heroic protagonists aided by beautiful heroines in a story of non-stop, bigger-than-life struggles and battles. So, if your taste goes toward the more amoral, often pornographic splatterpunk tales that pass for Mythos stories today, you're going to be disappointed.
In the first book, The Clock of Dreams, Lumley takes us on a tour of H.P. Lovecraft's Dreamlands adding a consistency and logic that was missing in Lovecraft's Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath, but retaining much of the wonder and magic. Like Derleth, Lumley is not fond of loose ends and ties up a lot of threads left by Lovecraft for others to repair. This time, Henri-Laurent de Marigny takes the role as main protagonist as he rescues his friend Titus Crow and his Elder God wife from the dream traps of Cthulhu himself.
In Spawn of the Winds, Crow and company are left behind and we are told the story of Hank Silburhutte, a two-fisted Texan with a striking resemblance to author Robert Howard. A story true to its 1930's pulp roots, Silburhutte and his friends are captured by Ithaqua aka the Wendigo and transported to the planet Borea which may or may not be in our galaxy, let alone our dimension. Be prepared for lots of descriptions of big burly men with rippling muscles and bulging sinews, beautiful alien women, and bloody battles. It's a lot of fun.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Weird Stuff......, July 2, 2002
By 
Daniel V. Reilly (Upstate New York, United States) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Titus Crow: The Clock of Dreams ; Spawn of the Winds (Hardcover)
Volume Two of Tor's three-volume omnibus reprints two books, The Clock of dreams and Spawn of the Winds. Much like Volume One, this book is a 50/50 affair....While the first half of Book One was GREAT, and the second half awful, we split the difference here: Part one is pretty good, if somewhat ridiculous, and part two is a vast improvement on what has gone before.
The Clock of Dreams presents us with the laughable image of two middle-aged men tooling around Dreamland in a flying GRANDFATHER CLOCK.......This is just too ridiculous to get past. The story takes place in H.P. Lovecraft's Dreamland, home of my most hated Lovecraft stories, so already I have a predjudice against this chapter, but Lumley actually manages to deliver a brisk story with a few great moments; He does especially well with Lovecraft's turbaned Denizens of Leng....
Spawn of the Winds fares better, because we're spared the boring presence of Titus Crow and his snooze-inducing crony, Henri. Spawn finds a team of psychics, mentioned briefly in Book One, who are abducted by Ithaqua, The Walker On The Winds, and taken to far-off Borea. From there we get a Robert E. Howard pastiche, as our two-fisted texan hero and his buddies are drawn into a war between Ithaqua's forces and the opposing army of his daughter, Armandra. The book is reminisicent of territory Lumley would cover later (and better...) in the Blood Brothers books. Spawn is a rip-snortin' action story, and together Clock and Spawn are a not bad read, if a tad predictable.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A good continuation, August 3, 2000
By 
"mrmxtrblk" (Taylors, SC USA) - See all my reviews
This two-part sequel to Titus Crow Volume 1 should certainly satisfy Lumley fans. I began with reading his recent Necroscope books and found his earlier work such as this to be just as entertaining. The first novella in the volume, Clock of Dreams, continues the story of Titus Crow and his sidekick, Henri Laurent De Marigny. It takes a change from its predecessors method of telling the story in the form of notebook entries and tape recordings and is written more like a conventional book. It takes place mostly in the Dreamlands, with Crow and Marigny battling Cthulhu and his evil minions, to prevent them from seizing control of the dreams of Mankind. The second novella (which is not quite as good since Marigny and Crow are never even mentioned and is not quite as engaging or original) features hot-headed Texan Hank Silberhutte battling the evil Ithaqua. I have yet to read the next installment of this series, but I'm sure Crow and Marigny will return! If you are a Lumley or Lovecraft fan, this book is a must-have.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Better than the first tome, June 20, 2011
First tome :

-Burrowers Beneath
-Transition of Titus Crow

This second tome:

-The Clock of dreams
-Spawn of the Winds

While the first tome was okay, though transition was painfull to read, scatered few a "few" good moments, This second tome is just great!

Clock of dreams takes place in the settings of HP Lovecraft Dreamworlds. Around these places, like my all time favorite, Ulthar, Lumley made a strong story. Entertaining and great if you already know the Dreamlands, for you will remember many places...

Spawn of the Winds was very good too! And quite honestly, I rather follow the "chronicles" of Hank Silberhutte (a character that you will encounter briefly in the very first story of tome 1) than Crow and De Marigny.
I think that the story is well made and more , er, realistic, If I can say so...
Here, you will come to learn what happened to Silberhutte in the first story, as this one is only about him, leaving Crow aside.

Now I'm begining the 3rd tome and with delight, I found that we start straight in Borea with the same party....
If you like the 1st book, you'll be delighted with this one. A must read and the best of the series so far...

I whish that M. Lumley would write something like the Borean Chronicles... it would be fantastic.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Enjoyable read; hard review!, September 19, 2009
By 
Kendal B. Hunter (Provo, UT United States) - See all my reviews
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It is hard to review this twofer. Although they take place in the same universe, the two books are vaguely connected. "The Clock of Dreams" ends Lumley's first Titus Crow trilogy, while "Spawn of the The Winds" begins his second trilogy. It would have been better for Tor to publish the three twofers as two three-in-ones, thereby keeping the trilogies separate.

If they needed to have three books, then the should have published "The compleat crow," the short-story collection, as a third volume. I see The Vortex Blaster Problem in play here: the six official Lensman books are frequently republished, but uniformly "The Vortex Blaster" is dropped from the series. Admittedly, it does not follow the main story line, but neither does "The Horse And His Boy" follow the main Narnia storyline. And in Adam's Hitchiker's Guide omnibus, they include the fragment "Young Zaphod Beeblebrox." It seems to be incomplete, but it is still included because it is relevant to the overall series.

The point being that in all cases, we should include all the relevant books in the series.

End of rant; now to the books.

THE CLOCK OF DREAMS

Five stars for the title alone. This magic coupling of the words--"clock" and "dreams"--was the reason why I began reading the series!

This story tightens the connection between HPL's universe and Lumley's elaboration. We meet the Dreamer Carter (Dreams of Terror and Death: The Dream Cycle of H. P. Lovecraft) and also Etienne-Laurent de Marigny from "Out of the Aeons" (The Loved Dead: Collected Short Stories Vol II (Wordsworth Mystery & Supernatural)). I would have liked an appendix showing where Lumley got his characters. But I guess I will have to bone up on my Lovecraft on my own.

This story abandoned the archival format, and had a detached storyteller format. So we resume a third-person narrative. The first person is always engaging, and makes the story seem real. The distance diminished the emotional impact of the horror.

And this is no longer a horror series, but fantasy-adventure. This is fine--series need to evolve to keep things fresh. Also, since this is the third in a trilogy, we also have the phenomenon of winding down. The loose ends are tied up, the "marrying and the burying" as Twain put it.

I'm not sure if the ending is a Deus Ex Machina. It is close, but since Lumley knows how to end a book with force and power, I forgive him.

Lumley compensates for three of Lovecraft's weaknesses. 1. Courage: There are no victims of horror, but people who fight back. 2. Romance: These courageous people fall in love. 3. Balance: The evil is balanced by a present good that is bold and impressive.

It is this last one--good that is bold and impressive--that fascinates me. Bold and impressive is how I would describe Kthanid, Cthulhu's goody-two-shoes brother.

As a God-figure He rivals C. S. Lewis' Aslan (The Chronicles of Narnia Movie Tie-in Edition (adult) ). If we can forgive Christ for being depicted as a lion, we can certainly forgive G-d for being depicted as an octo-head in these myths. But it's not his *appearance*, rather his *presence* that conveys a sense of cosmic majesty.

As his "last battle" shows, Kthanid is not a tame octopus!

SPAWN OF THE WINDS

This book is mistitled; it should be called "Child of the Winds" or "Princess of the Winds." Lumley, I think, realizes he has slipped into urban fantasy-adventure. The title hearkens back to his Lovecraftian roots, but it does not fit the story.

The second problem is that this begins a second trilogy. The series is rebooted with new characters and situations---the CCD are there (The Ithaqua Cycle: The Wind-Walker of the Icy Wastes (Call of Cthulhu Fiction)), the star-stones are prominent. And we still have the Wilmarth Foundation, but we meet some of their other operations and their other heroes. So this is both a plus and a minus.

The third problem is that, since this is a reboot, we never meet Crow and de Maurigny. I kept expecting them to appear, so this unmet expectation kept nagging my mind and interfering with the pleasure of writing. The dynamic duo appear in the next volume, so this problem also is a plus and a minus

All else is good. Lumley returns the archival format, with it verisimilitude of classified documents. MJ-12 documents, eat your heart out!

The change of setting is exactly what a series like this needs. Coming from finishing Dune 7 ("Hunters of Dune" and "Sandworms of Dune"), the ice world is exactly what I needed. I felt like I was pulled into the snow-dunes of the early Jack London prospecting short stories (Jack London : Novels and Stories : Call of the Wild / White Fang / The Sea-Wolf / Klondike and Other Stories (Library of America)).

You have the man versus man conflict and the man verses mad demon conflict, but in the background there is the man versus icelandic waste conflict. It does not affect the story, but it does brood in the sidelines.

We have shifted from horror to fantasy adventure. The story has the excitement of The Lost World, but the magic of Indiana Jones. Crow is enigmatic, and de Maurigny has his moments, but Hank Silberhutte is straight from the classic pulps.

I say classic pulp, because the story has all the force of a pulp, but clearly follows the pattern. Square-jawed Texan entering the realm of a fairy princess. A stranger, he masters the realm, vanquishes the evil, and gets the girl in the end. Classic Joseph Campbell.

And this story should be familiar to you--you read it before in She (Oxford World's Classics), A Princess of Mars (Dover Value Editions), the first Titus Crow trilogy, and Doc Savage and The Land of Always Night.

It is a great archetype, and Lumley retells it flawlessly.
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5.0 out of 5 stars The Books of My Desire, November 13, 2013
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This review is from: Titus Crow: The Clock of Dreams ; Spawn of the Winds (Hardcover)
I've read hundreds of si-fi books in my life, I read the Titus Crow books when I was serving in the Navy back in the 1970's, since then I have been searching for these two book. Of all the books I've read The transition of Titus Crow, and the Clock of Dreams, plus, The Mirror of Her Dreams, and a Man Rides Through, are two stories that have always stood out as my favorite stories. Thank you for helping me get the books of my long desire. Daniel Voges of Nebraska.
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars It took an effort of will to finish the whole thing, February 19, 2004
I'm a big enough fan of Lovecraft, especially his Dreamlands stories, that I found the first half mildly entertaining. Mostly for the ways that Lumley extends, changes, and explains various aspects of the dreamlands. It's not as much fun as the Dreamlands novels that Lumley wrote about Hero and Eldin, because, well, the protaganists are somewhat stuffy and dull. Also, this story is more about technology, which I don't think mixes with the fantasy of the dreamlands setting very well.
The second novel in this volume - ugh. I could barely finish it, and had me saying things like "Give me a break!" out loud on the bus. It was only my hunger for Lovecraft related lore that gave me the stamina to finish it. It lacked any real sense of wonder. The combination of a bleak setting and a plot that's a collection of cliches and abuses of Cthulhu mythos ideas just bored me to tears, when it didn't infuriate or exasperate me.
Life's too short to waste on books this bad. The only reason I can justify having spent hours and hours reading Spawn of the Winds is that it sets up In the Moons of Borea (contained in volume 3 of the Titus Crow collection), which is slightly more entertaining and interesting.
If you happen to really like Lumley's Necroscope books, I found the second half of this collection to be very similar to Necroscope 3: The Source. Our intrepid heroes are whisked away to a bleak, dangerous world beset by a supernatural threat; small bands of similar refugees survive against all odds; etc etc. I also found that book barely tolerable. So, if you disagree strongly with my assessment of The Source, you'll probably actually really like this book.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Not the best of the Titus Crow books but still enjoyable, June 24, 2014
By 
CT Phipps (Ashland, Ky USA) - See all my reviews
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The third volume of the Titus Crow series by Briam Lumley changes locales again. While the first volume was set on Earth and the second was a space-time crossing adventure, this is a story set entirely in the Dreamlands. H.P. Lovecraft's Dream Cycle is, already, his most "out there" work and its setting only becomes more so in Brian Lumley's hands.

This is certainly the most 'fantasy-esque' of his books and doesn't properly belong in the horror section of books at all. Indeed, I'd say it's as much a pastiche of Edgar Rice Burroughs as anything else. For some people this will prove intriguing but, sadly, this is my least favorite of the Titus Crow novels.

The Clock of Dreams' premise is Henri Laurent de Marginy, the intrepid sidekick of Titus Crow, finds out his mentor has been kidnapped along with said mentor's new bride. Henri is recruited by the Elder God Kthanid to go get them back. This requires Henri to journey into the Dreamlands, specifically to the city of Ulthar, and try to get them back. It's a fairly straightforward premise and gets resolved around the halfway mark before a series of side-adventures occur which end in a confrontation with the Other God Nyarlathotep.

Unfortunately, The Clock of Dreams is a book decidedly lacking in tension. Despite the fact Henri loses the overpowered Clock of Dreams early on, there's very little actual threat from the opponents they face. The Horned Men are decidedly un-intimidating opponents compared to the Chthonians from The Burrowers Beneath. Likewise, Nyarlathotep is far from the omnipotent figure from Lovecraft's Dream Cycle. Instead, he's merely a different kind of monster and far from as powerful as the heroes' patron Elder God.

The book's treatment of the Girl Goddess Tiania isn't very pleasing either. Despite being thousands of years old and, presumably, every bit the same level of sorcerer as capable of learning in Elysia--she's easily captured not once but three times during the course of the novel. Titus Crow is also very dismissive of his lady love. This, despite the fact Titus Crow is equally ineffective against the forces they're arrayed against.

Despite this, there's still much to admire in this volume. My favorite part of the book is the story of the dreamer Elderby, who finds the town he visits in his dream taken over by the Horned Men and its people reduced to slavery. Its a haunting and evocative tale which, despite having a "happy" ending is the most traditionally Lovecraftian portion of this tale. I also liked a hilarious scene where Henri pilots the titular clock while drunk off his ass.

Overall, I wasn't a big fan of The Clock of Dreams. The books have shifted genre repeatedly with the first being a horror-adventure, the second being science-fiction, and the third being fantasy. The abrupt tonal shift was also troubled by the relative incompetence of the villains and the ease by which they're disposed of. Our heroes' victories are earned, occasionally, but they seem to come too easy to be really enjoyable. I didn't much care for the treatment of Tiania either. As a result, I could take or leave this novel and suggest it only for those who want to complete their Titus Crow collection.

6.5/10
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Cleaning the Clocks of the CCD, November 25, 2009
After having slogged through Volume One of the Titus Crow series, complete with lisping dragons, green haired space princesses, and a narrative riddled with ellipses, I steeled myself for Volume Two. With the prototypical pulp hero Titus Crow and his trusty sidekick Henri de Marginy cleaning the clocks (pun intended) of the Cthulhu Cycle Deities (CCD, ugh), there wasn't much left for them to do. But like every good epic series, when the heroes become gods among men in the mortal realm...they leave the mortal realm behind to find adventure.

The Clock of Dreams begins with a rather peculiar scenario: Crow and Tiania have been captured in the Dreamlands. How this happened is hand waved; basically, Crow and Tiana are drugged and enslaved by the Men of Leng. Given that Crow is a cyborg that is highly resistant to damage, it seems unlikely that poisoning him would work...but perhaps that's because this is the Dreamlands and not Earth's reality.

The first half of the novel involves de Marginy's quest to find Crow in the Dreamlands. Once there, Crow takes up the second half as he seeks to rescue Tiania. What's interesting is that Clock of Dreams is one of the first to posit that Cthulhu's dream sendings actually infect the Dreamlands. Here, great nightmarish factories corrupt the land, guarded by three foul guardians: the worm-like Flyer, its tentacle-armed Rider, and a three-legged Runner. Overseeing the entire operation is a deathly titanic Keeper, who in turn servers Nyarlathotep.

Overall, this is book is an improvement over the first volume, if only because there's more for Titus to do. Unlike the previous books, it's told in the present tense, which lends much urgency to the narrative. There's plenty of combat, skullduggery, and a hilarious moment where the only way de Marginy can return to the Dreamlands is to get roaring drunk. With guest appearances by Randolph Carter and King Kuranes, flying airships, and shields that shoot laser beams, this is pulp Cthulhu at its wackiest. But it's juicy and satisfying, especially when Nyarlathotep shows up at the end to put our heroes in their place.

Spawn of the Winds, on the other hand, is a different breed of pulp. Crow and de Marginy are nowhere to be found in this book; its inclusion is primarily because of Ithaqua, who is assigned a peculiar set of personality traits here. Ithaqua, you see, lusts after human women (as all pulp villains inevitably do) because he seeks to spawn terrible progeny who will walk among the winds with him. The winds, as defined by Lumley, are the spaces between worlds, and occasionally Ithaqua kidnaps people and carries them across dimensions to the world of Borea.

Borea is a wind-swept frozen world filled with every snow land cliché imaginable: Vikings, Eskimos, white wolves, polar bears, ski-boats, and lots and lots of snow. I kept waiting for Santa Claus to show up. Ithaqua's penchant for turning people into wendigos is turned on its ear here - instead, Ithaqua alters the physiology of those whom he traps on Borea so that they are immune to the cold.

The protagonist is an American named Hank Silberhutte, a member of the Wilmarth Foundation out to avenge his cousin, whom he believes was killed by Ithaqua. Silberhutte is a Texan, which of course means he can punch anybody's lights out who dares mess with him. He is also a powerful psychic, capable of linking with Juanita Alvarez, a telepathic receiver and our narrator, across the gulfs of space.

Tagging along is Silberhutte's companions, Paul White (an oracle known as "hunchman"), Dick Selway, Jimmy Franklin, and Silberhutte's hot little sister Tracy. A fateful encounter with Ithaqua ends with Selway dead and the others changed. Only Tracy, holding onto her star stones, remains unaffected.

Awakening on Borea, a brutal war of attrition ensues between worshippers of the Wind Walker who want nothing more than to sacrifice Tracy to Ithaqua (she's a "damned good-looking girl" says Silberhutte). Leading the opposition is Armandra, Woman of the Winds and daughter of Ithaqua. She's basically Storm with wind powers. She flies about the wastes, her flame-red hair whipping behind her, with skin as pale as snow and eyes as stormy as a winter...you get the idea.

Silberhutte falls madly in love with her, both physically and psychically, and their escalating relationship only complicates the war between the two factions. If Armandra dares intervene directly with her wind powers, Ithaqua joins the fray as well. And yet Armandra refuses to let any harm come to Silberhutte, who also wants to join the fight as the macho leader of his Eskimo warriors. It's all very primal.

Unlike the other books in the Crow series, this is a lusty, gun-toting, fist-swinging, princess rescuing, rip-roaring yarn that chews up scenery like a bad actor in a Shakespearean play. It doesn't always make sense, but it's a heck of a lot of fun to read.
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5.0 out of 5 stars brin Lumley, March 23, 2014
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It arrived on time i haven't read it yet, but brian lumly has never disappointed me in the 20 yeears or so that i have been reading his books.
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Titus Crow: The Clock of Dreams ; Spawn of the Winds
Titus Crow: The Clock of Dreams ; Spawn of the Winds by Brian Lumley (Hardcover - July 1997)
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