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To Live Again Paperback – January 31, 1999


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 248 pages
  • Publisher: Pulpless.com (January 31, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1584450185
  • ISBN-13: 978-1584450184
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #5,211,455 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Robert Silverberg has been a professional writer since 1955, widely known for his science fiction and fantasy stories. He is a many-time winner of the Hugo and Nebula awards, was named to the Science Fiction Hall of Fame in 1999, and in 2004 was designated as a Grand Master by the Science Fiction Writers of America. His books and stories have been translated into forty languages. Among his best known titles are NIGHTWINGS, DYING INSIDE, THE BOOK OF SKULLS, and the three volumes of the Majipoor Cycle: LORD VALENTINE'S CASTLE, MAJIPOOR CHRONICLES, VALENTINE PONTIFEX. His collected short stories, covering nearly sixty years of work, have been published in nine volumes by Subterranean Press. His most recent book is TALES OF MAJIPOOR (2013), a new collection of stories set on the giant world made famous in LORD VALENTINE'S CASTLE.

He and his wife, writer Karen Haber, and an assorted population of cats live in the San Francisco Bay Area in a sprawling house surrounded by exotic plants.













Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

By s.ferber on January 27, 2014
Format: Paperback
By the time Robert Silverberg released "To Live Again" in 1969, he had already come out with no less than three dozen science-fiction novels and several hundred short stories, all in a period of only 15 years! The amazingly prolific author had entered a more mature and literate phase in his writing career in 1967, starting with his remarkable novel "Thorns," and by 1969 was on some kind of a genuine roll. Just one of six sci-fi novels that Silverberg came out with that year (including the Nebula-winning "Nightwings" and my personal favorite of this author so far, "Downward to the Earth"), "To Live Again" initially appeared as a Doubleday hardcover and, surprisingly, was NOT nominated for a Hugo or Nebula award. To this day, the book does not seem to be as highly regarded as many of Silverberg's others, and yet a recent perusal has suggested to this reader that the book might well be overdue for a critical reassessment.

In the novel (which, from internal evidence, transpires a few hundred years from now), a means has been found of recording and preserving the personae of the living. These "soul tapes" can later be imprinted on the brains of others after the taped individuals have passed on; a way of preserving their identity after death, and cohabitating in the mind of a suitable host. Against this remarkable backdrop, Silverberg introduces us to two of the wealthiest men on Earth. Mark Kaufmann, the nephew of the late, great banker/industrialist Paul Kaufmann, and John Roditis, a self-made upstart who cannot claim the same kind of upper-crust pedigree as the Kaufmann clan. Both men are desirous of receiving the persona of Uncle Paul, to add to their own already-sharp business minds, and so, the scheming and plotting begins.
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4 of 7 people found the following review helpful By John Robinson on February 24, 2004
Format: Paperback
...this is one of my favorite Silverberg novels. Five stars may seem rather high, but I have found pleasure in reading it many times, and what truer measure of value is there than repeated enjoyable readings?
It is considered to be a minor work in the Silverberg opus, however. If you are looking for pretense or snob-literature, this is not the book for you. If you are looking for the definitive statement of Silverberg-the-writer, then this is not that either (and there is no such book, Silverbob has had too varied and rich a career to be epitomized by any one work).
If, on the other hand, you want a strongly plotted story with some interesting characters and events, a world you can enjoy dipping into from time to time, then this book is great! The story has great drive and the motivations are well-justified and intense.
One note: Although I have never yet seen it mentioned (well, I haven't looked very hard), I suspect that this book is a "tribute novel" to Jack Vance's "To Live Forever" which contains many of the same devices and even very similar scenes in certain places (this is legitimate in SF, by the way; TLA is a very different work than TLF in essential ways). I wonder if anyone can confirm this for me? TLF was published, I believe, in the same year that Silverberg won the Hugo for Most Promising etc (1956).
Anyway, buy it, enjoy it, read it again later. I did.
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3 of 7 people found the following review helpful By "dracul-san" on May 21, 2001
Format: Paperback
To me, TLA is not just the average sci-fi story, it is set in the future (at least the future, as Silverberg saw it in the sixties), but that is merely a help to let the story unfold, as the transplanting of people's mind was not quite possible (yet?) The story primarily focuses on the Kaufmann family, and their greatest enemy Roditis, whom all want the mind of a deceased multinational, it is really about greed and power, about human nature, and it is very interesting at that.
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0 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Mithridates VI of Pontus VINE VOICE on July 20, 2011
Format: Mass Market Paperback
To Live Again (1969) is a flawed work from a very fruitful period of Robert Silverberg's career. The ideas are original and well-conceived but a downright disgusting strain of misogyny and sexism permeates virtually every page. Bluntly put, I cannot recall a single instance where a female character does anything without the shape, size, and clothed or unclothed state of her breasts mentioned and dwelled on at length. Similarly, each female character attempts to seduce all the men in sight (including relatives). It's a shame really because our heroine Risa, over the course of the novel, develops and evolves from a headstrong child into an intelligent and self-sufficient women to be reckoned with.

The central scientific concept is a standard one: the ability to transplant the mind of a dead person into a living being. Silverberg expands this trope in a series of wonderful and original directions. A human with a transplant does not lose his own personality. Instead the host consults with the transplants and draws on their memories/personalities. Extremely powerful personalities have been known to overtake their host's mind if it is weak -- "going dybbuk."

The rich an0d wealthy procure multiple transplants for artistic reasons (for example, to appreciate sculpture), as savvy business moves (using the mind of your dead rival), or even to increase one's abilities in bed. The transplants often mature their hosts or drive them insane.

Brief Plot Summary

John Roditis and Mark Kaufmann are fierce business rivals who both desire to procure the mind of Paul Kaufmann, an extraordinarily powerful and savvy individual who has the potential to take over his host.
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