To the Moon and Timbuktu: A Trek Through the Heart of Africa and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
  • List Price: $25.00
  • Save: $10.00 (40%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Want it tomorrow, April 18? Order within and choose One-Day Shipping at checkout. Details
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Like New | Details
Sold by bluesagebooks
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: Excellent Copy! Clean, Tight & Square, Appears Unused,Eligible for Free Super Saver Shipping and Prime. Fast Amazon shipping plus a hassle free return policy mean your satisfaction is guaranteed!
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

To the Moon and Timbuktu: A Trek through the Heart of Africa Hardcover


See all 7 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from Collectible from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$15.00
$9.53 $5.73

Frequently Bought Together

To the Moon and Timbuktu: A Trek through the Heart of Africa + Bootstrapper: From Broke to Badass on a Northern Michigan Farm
Price for both: $33.27

Buy the selected items together

If you buy a new print edition of this book (or purchased one in the past), you can buy the Kindle edition for only $0.99 (Save 83%). Print edition purchase must be sold by Amazon. Learn more.


Big Spring Books
Editors' Picks in Spring Releases
Ready for some fresh reads? Browse our picks for Big Spring Books to please all kinds of readers.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 320 pages
  • Publisher: New Harvest; 1 edition (July 9, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0544025954
  • ISBN-13: 978-0544025950
  • Product Dimensions: 8.4 x 5.9 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.1 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (53 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #980,835 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Discouraged with her domestic life in Paris and career as a reporter, Sovich embarks on an overland journey across West Africa. From her Swedish mother, who felt trapped by suburban life, Sovich inherited an escapist conception of travel: "The overriding lesson of my childhood was that travel was the only thing that could ever make a woman happy." Laced with her piquant observations, Sovich's memoir embodies the persistent longing for adventure her middle class upbringing inspired. As she traverses the harsh landscape from Morocco to Niger, Sovich finds company in the stories of female Victorian travelers, especially Englishwoman Mary Kingsley whom she describes as a "swashbuckler first, scientist second." Rejecting creature comforts, Sovich dives headlong into the desert. "I enjoy my depravation, even feel superior about it. In paring down my life like this I want to remind myself how little we actually need. There is also, however, a tinge of vanity to what I do." What she emerges with is a deeply personal journey into an incredibly remote region. Sovich casts her polished journalistic eye on the anguish and sublime beauty she encounters while unflinchingly narrating her own intensely intimate journey. (July)

From Booklist

Being free to travel the world and make amazing discoveries may sound like an unattainable dream to some, but Sovich made it happen, leaving the rest of us to read about it in her memoir. After realizing that she was conforming to the stereotypical roles of wife and mother and had yet to travel the world as she once planned, she packs up her bags and begins her life’s journey across Africa. Sovich describes a high-energy trek through Western Sahara and Niger, and the striking scenery isn’t the only aspect that makes her story so vivid. Her accounts of the people she comes across along the way add much dimension to her tale. An intriguing and involving memoir about long-awaited, life-changing travels. --Carissa Chesanek

More About the Author

Nina Sovich was born in suburban Connecticut to a Swedish mother and an American father. Throughout her 20s she traveled in the Middle East, spending time in Pakistan, Egypt and the West Bank. She has reported for the Wall Street Journal and Reuters news service. At present she lives in Paris with her husband and two children. To the Moon and Timbuktu is the story of her trek through West Africa shortly after getting married in 2005. It is her first book.

Customer Reviews

Nina gives really good descriptions and insights of the people she meets there and that is a wonder.
Lynn Ellingwood
Nina Sovich's story reminds us of the struggles and contradictions in our own lives and how we are, or could be, travelers in a world of marvels.
Niki Collins-queen, Author
It isn't often that I read a book purely for pleasure, so when I do it had better hold my interest, and this book did exactly that.
AKN

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Divascribe VINE VOICE on June 1, 2013
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Nina Sovich loves her husband, but her life in Paris leaves her feeling empty and unfulfilled. Her mother had traveled in Africa when Nina was a child, and came back with fascinating stories of the places she had seen. And her father mentioned Timbuktu as a faraway, exotic place that sparked her imagination. So Nina, who has been a reporter and already seen a bit of the world, decides to take off on her own and explore Western Africa with only a few necessities in a backpack. Her ultimate goal is the distant, mysterious city of Timbuktu.

To the Moon and Timbuktu is the story of a journey -- three journeys, in fact, because Nina keeps going back. She does reach Timbuktu, but more importantly, she reaches inside herself to find the person she really is. Her descriptions of the places and people of West Africa are well-crafted -- I felt like I knew some of the characters personally. She sees grinding poverty and describes living conditions that frankly made me shudder -- and admire her dogged determination. She uses various forms of transportation, some not all that safe, to get from one place to the other in the vast West African desert.

Frankly, I'm rather amazed that her husband didn't try harder to talk her out of her journeys, but he seems an unusually sensitive man who understands that his wife needs to do this -- not just to prove that she can, but for personal growth.

Throughout the book, she talks about two other women who ventured into Africa: 1800s explorer Mary Kingsley, and Isak Dineson, who wrote the famous memoir "Out of Africa." She feels a kinship with both women. She meets women in African villages who bring her into their circle of friendship, and she discovers, despite the obvious cultural differences, that women everywhere share common bonds.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By T.S. on July 17, 2013
Format: Hardcover
The stories themselves are crystalline in their beauty--there's a kind of lyrical clarity throughout the writing but there's complexity and unexpected angles (sometimes humorous, sometimes punches). The stories are peopled with fascinating characters, including Sovich herself who is present and thinking but never overwhelming the rest of what is happening, I love how everything is on display: the good, the bad, the funny, the sad, the Other, the self, and the way they all keep dissolving and reassembling.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Nancy Loderick TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on May 26, 2013
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Nina Sovich always wanted to travel, even after she was married and "settled" in Paris. Her husband, Florent, is very understanding and encourages her to follow her dreams. She travels to Africa and explores the Western Sahara, Mali, Mauritania and Niger. I was immediately fascinated by her travels since I was not familiar with Mali or Mauritania. I love learning about new places!

Why I so enjoyed this book:

* Nina not only writes of her physical travels, but of her journey to personal growth. She masterfully interweaves the two. Her trip to Timbuktu is especially inspiring.

* The masterful descriptions of the places she visits were so realistic. I can just see the long horned cows drinking from the river, the brightly clad villagers walking to get water, etc.

* The people she meets are real characters. Nina really brings them to life. I picture Africa as a violent and unfriendly place. Nina's special friendships with the women she meets paint quite a different picture. The women are warm, welcoming and kind.

* It inspired me to learn more about Africa. I am looking forward to reading more about Mary Kingsley, an 1800's Gabon traveler, and Karen Blixen, a Kenyan farmer during World War I.

I would have loved to have seen a map showing Nina's travels. As part of my continuing education about Africa, I will look up the areas myself. It also would have been really interesting to see pictures. I understand Nina traveled light, so packing a camera was not in her plans.

I highly recommend this book to anyone wanting to learn more about Africa. Even if you're not interested in Africa, this is an inspiring book about personal growth.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By J. D. Fegler VINE VOICE on June 20, 2013
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I enjoyed Nina Sovich's To the Moon and Timbuktu because it was a glimpse at an Africa that I was not familiar with. Nina is a woman in her late 30's who has spent her young adult life travelling to all reaches of the globe, living and interacting with the people who call these places home. When she marries and settles in Paris, she finds herself very unhappy, yearning for the adventures she had experienced before. She decides to go to Africa and chooses Timbuktu because it is a name she recognizes. Most of the book details her journey TO Timbuktu, but a smaller part of the book deals with her time when she actuallly reaches Timbuktu. I found her stories easy to relate to. They are not grand stories, they are simply the stories of the real people who live and work in these poor and often desolate places. Though the people may not be rich, the experiences they share with her leave her feeling fulfilled and satisfied. Because the stories are of the ordinary people, some may not find the book a page turner. I certainly appreciated meeting these people and learning about these places along with Ms. Sovich. Her writing is vivid and sometimes humorous. I found myself easily slipping into her shoes.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Product Images from Customers

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search
ARRAY(0xa6426ce4)