Engineering & Transportation
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

To Rise from Earth: An Easy-To-Understand Guide to Spaceflight Paperback – February 1, 2000


See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$43.26 $4.00
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
$0.10

Customers Who Viewed This Item Also Viewed

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

China
Engineering & Transportation Books
Discover books for all types of engineers, auto enthusiasts, and much more. Learn more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Checkmark Books; 2 edition (February 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0816040923
  • ISBN-13: 978-0816040926
  • Product Dimensions: 10.4 x 8 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.3 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #104,132 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

Lee, a space flight engineer with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, delivers just what the subtitle promises: a nontechnical lay reader's introduction to the technology, physics, and history of spaceflight. In seven chapters, the author explains the workings of launch vehicles, orbits, and satellites with the help of numerous charts and illustrations. He describes the basics of orbital mechanics and how spacecraft accomplish the maneuvers necessary to rendezvous in space. A chapter on space history traces U.S. and Russian space milestones, and coverage of Space Shuttle operations, unmanned planetary exploration, and the future of Mars exploration round out the book. This is a useful introductory reference that, despite some minor factual errors and misidentifications in the captions (e.g., the first manned lunar landing took place on July 20, not January 20, 1969, and the crew pictured is obviously not the crew of Gemini 8 bobbing in the Pacific Ocean but a studio shot of Gemini 12's crew) will be a useful addition for public libraries.?Thomas J. Frieling, Bainbridge Coll., Ga.
Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Booklist

Promising to teach orbital mechanics "without the math," Lee, an engineer with the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, delivers the facts space enthusiasts will savor--but they must be enthusiasts. The casually interested, spoiled by the glossy paper and color photos of high-end space books, will probably sniff at this volume's gray graphics, line drawings, and black-and-white photographs. Lee's purpose is less to impress than to explain the principles of rocket propulsion and how a spacecraft achieves or changes orbit. Verily, interested readers yearn to see a shuttle launch, and, after telling them where to write for tickets, Lee profiles the sequence of countdown events, followed by the major events of maneuvering in flight. The other orbital problem Lee explains is how to get to Mars, which two new spacecraft, dubbed Mars Pathfinder and Mars Global Surveyor, will attempt to do in the winter of 1996, lending this book the asset of pre-event timeliness. Given the longstanding fascination with space, some public libraries will surely supply Lee with readers. Gilbert Taylor --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
3
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 4 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 12, 1996
Format: Hardcover
To Rise From Earth is a good introduction to the science of space flight. A combination of history and science, this well illustrated book explains the basic science of space flight, orbital mechanics and flying to other planets at a level that should be understandable by a high school student.

The book is profusely illustrated, and full of marginal comments - Historical facts, Scientific facts, Rules of thumb - which make it very dippable. True to its intent, it explains the pricipals of space flight clearly, without using a single equation.

As well as the theory, the book also gives a history of space flight, from the first experiments with rockects by Goddard and von Braun, through the American manned space programs (Mercury, Gemini, Apollo), with a large chapter devoted to the Space Shuttle. A review of unmanned planetary probes is also given, along with a final chapter on future exploration of Mars.

Throughout the book focuses on the American space program. One of its shortcomings is that the Russian space program is almost completely ignored. Also some of the Scientific and Historical facts given are wrong.

Overall, a very simple, readable and useful reference
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Kevin W. Parker on February 15, 2001
Format: Paperback
This book is about half what it says in the title, covering the details of orbital mechanics: getting into orbit, changing orbits, and rendezvous. In the second part, it turns more historical, providing brief overviews of both the manned and unmanned space programs, focusing particularly on the space shuttle and on interplanetary expeditions. It's about as clearly and as simply written as a book on such a topic could be and is sumptuously illustrated with appropriate diagrams, photographs, and tables.
I quibbled with the occasional inaccuracy on non-central subjects: Michael Collins may now be "pursuing a career in international diplomacy," but after he left the astronaut corps he first became the director of the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum. And Apollo 13 was never in danger of running out of air, since the lunar module needed plenty of extra oxygen to vent out the cabin at the beginning of each moonwalk. But those are peripheral to the core and only of interest to a nitpicker like me, who starts looking for other inaccuracies rather than continuing to pay full attention to the text.
It would also have been nice to see more about the technology of space flight than just the orbital mechanics. For example, it might have been worthwhile to discuss the sort of instruments that get put on board a spacecraft and the technology that a satellite uses to determine its position.
But anyhow, the book is very good at what it covers. I would recommend it highly to someone who is just learning about space flight, though only mildly to someone who already knows the basic concepts.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Hardcover
Although now seriously dated in its treatment of the history of spaceflight, a treatment that was rather limited in scope to begin with, this book does provide a clear and informative introduction to the basics of orbital dynamics from a qualitative point of view. Easy to understand and nicely illustrated, it's a fine first step in grasping the mechanics of spaceflight, at least in terms of orbital paths. I agree with another reviewer that the book would have been greatly improved with more background on spacecraft systems. Still, this is definitely recommended.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I teach an undergraduate space training course for Air Force officers and LOVE this book. It explains things at a level that anyone with a high school level education can understand. It teaches orbital mechanics, without the math. AWESOME! Only drawback: it is out of print and the publisher has no intent to bring it back.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?