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H To He Who Am I The Only One Extra tracks, Import, Original recording remastered


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Audio CD, Extra tracks, Import, June 14, 2005
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$13.99 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details Only 5 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

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H To He Who Am I The Only One + Pawn Hearts + Least We Can Do Is Wave To Each Other
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Editorial Reviews

Remastered album includes the bonus tracks 'Squid/Octopus' (live) & 'The Emperor In His War-room' (early take). EMI. 2005.

Listen to Samples and Buy MP3s

Songs from this album are available to purchase as MP3s. Click on "Buy MP3" or view the MP3 Album.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         

Samples
Song Title Time Price
listen  1. Killer (2005 Digital Remaster) 8:22$1.29  Buy MP3 
listen  2. House With No Door (2005 Digital Remaster) 6:30$1.29  Buy MP3 
listen  3. Emperor In His War-room: The Emperor/The Room (2005 Digital Remaster) 8:18$1.29  Buy MP3 
listen  4. Lost: The Dance In Sand And Sea/The Dance In The Frost (2005 Digital Remaster)11:13Album Only
listen  5. Pioneers Over C (2005 Digital Remaster)12:15Album Only
listen  6. Squid/Octopus15:23Album Only
listen  7. Emperor In His War-Room: The Emperor/The Room (Early Take) 8:50$1.29  Buy MP3 

Product Details

  • Audio CD (June 14, 2005)
  • Original Release Date: 2005
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Extra tracks, Import, Original recording remastered
  • Label: Caroline World Service
  • ASIN: B0009F9O6M
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #46,178 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

21 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Jeffrey J.Park VINE VOICE on January 2, 2006
Format: Audio CD
I went out and bought all of the EMI remastered albums and they are simply superb. The sound quality of H to He Who am the Only One has been vastly improved upon and the liner notes are wonderfully detailed and include various photos of the band scattered throughout. In addition to the original tracks, the electrifying and thunderous 15'24" Squid1/Squid 2/Octopus was added on along with the first version of The Emperor in his War Room. I should note that EMI did not use copy-control technology on the remastered albums so playback problems should not plague listeners.

This is the bleakest, most gothic prog rock I have ever heard. Instrumentation is sparse, with great drumming from Guy Evans (I can really hear the subtleties of his playing on the cleaned up recording), solid bass playing from Nic Potter, twisted Hammond organ work from keyboardist Hugh Banton, angular and aggressive sax playing from David Jackson (he would play two saxes at the same time - in fact Jackson, not to mention Colosseum sax player Dick Heckstall-Smith borrowed this technique from jazzer Rahsaan Roland Kirk) and a tiny bit of aggressive guitar work from guest Robert Fripp on "The Emperor in his War Room". Although synthesizers are largely absent, Hugh Banton is in fact credited with using an oscillator - which is a crude synthesizer (wave form generator actually). The most distinctive aspects of the music are Peter Hammill's anguished lyrics and his vocal delivery, which ranges from a tortured, heavy metal rasp to a smooth, high-pitched falsetto. While some folks find his vocals overwrought and excessively dramatic (this reaches a peak on "Lost"), it really makes this music work. Pieces are in the 6'00-12'25 range, with the heaviest track being the introductory "Killer".
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Format: Audio CD
This was the 1st VDGG remaster I picked up and oh, my! did it live up to what I hoped it would be. Someone earlier said that these Charisma bands suffered from a kitchen-sink-induced murkiness in the production, largely because they were trying to stretch the then-new 16-track technology to its absolute limits... that's what makes these remasters (and in particular our friend Hydrogen to Helium here) so great and so long overdue. Comparing the new CDs to the old ones (and, God forbid, the "First Generation" compilation from the 1980s) is like looking at a high-resolution struck print of a photograph versus a Xerox made on a faulty machine, there is no comparison, really.

Anyway this is a classic album made all-the-more towering by the inclusion of the ridiculous live-in-the-studio bonus take of the heretofore mythical "Squid/Octopus" opus. Progressive Rock was (at its best, like here) a truly creative enterprise before it collapsed under the weight of its own self-image around the time PG quit Genesis and Fripp (who tears up a nice sustain-y Les Paul excursion on "The Emperor In His War Room" here) broke up Crimson the first time... and this late-1970 record proves it with the inimitable VDGG triumverate of loopy stop/start/dissolve/jumpcut cinematic arrangements, magnificent drums/double sax interplay from Guy Evans and D-Jax, and the manically panicked vocal stylings of Hammill. Hugh Banton, who built his instruments from the ground up, contributes his usual quota of terrifying organissimo as well... he is kind of the bridge between Hammill and the unusual rhythm section.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By DLE on April 5, 2006
Format: Audio CD
If there is a band who can express "Being and Nothingness" by Jean Paul Satre or "Being and Time" by Heidegger, THIS IS THE BAND! This band explores the deep dark abyssmal recesses of being with SOUND. Does this "sound" like something you want to experience sonically? You may be saying a big NO! But if you consider yourself a progressive music fan in the very least, then IT IS YOUR DUTY TO LISTEN TO THIS MASTERPIECE! It is one of the most hauntingly disturbing prog masterpieces I have ever encountered. Desert Island record for any progressive rock fan.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Chris J. Previti on February 22, 2006
Format: Audio CD
To think this music was originally recorded more than thirty-five years ago is amazing, considering the punch and vitality it still contains in this new century. VDGG has always been totally unique. Peter Hammill's vision, leading this fine band of musicians to places other bands fear to tread has always been an adventurous and rewarding listening experience. I'll admit, initially it might take a little getting used to for some people. These guys are different, but boy is it worth getting into! H to He contains some of the band's best work. There are moments of straight ahead rock (Killer), achingly beautiful laments (House With no Door) and cool spacey rock (Pioneers Over C). The remastering job sounds great. Get it!
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Zachary A. Hanson on July 20, 2006
Format: Audio CD
On _H to He . . ._, the listener hears a prog band firmly developing its own personality, with David Jackson's distinctive saxophone playing and Peter Hammill's quirky sonwriting sensibility standing out. Still, they haven't completely separated from the prog pack at this point, like they would on _Pawn Hearts_. The first song, "Killer," definitely indicates a band striking in its own direction, with Hammill's trudging chromatic organ riff dominating the proceeding in the middle of the song. Then the typical flower generation refrain comes in at the end ("We need love . . ." over and over). Oh well. It was pretty sweet until then.

And after all, it is Britain and it is 1970. You hear Genesis influences in Hammill's erudition, Keith Emerson influences in Hammill's attempts at keyboard histrionics (let's just say the best is yet to come for him), but you especially hear King Crimson influences here. Guy Evans sounds like a Bill Bruford wanna-be for a large part. Listen to track 2, "House with No Door." It's got the precious lyrical sensibility of early Peter Gabriel, but other than that it almost sounds like it could be _Court of the Crimson King_ with its magisterial post-"Whiter Shade of Pale" progression and snare-fill-heavy drum attack. I don't dislike it, but like I said they are not differentiated from the pack as much as they could be.

VDGG, like most of their compeers at this point, seem to be recovering from the 1960's. It took releases like their _Pawn Hearts_ a few years later to establish the truly frantic paranoid mood that was the inevitable result of the Summer of Love (and the ultimate manifestation of this was yet to come with punk; I like to think of _Pawn Hearts_ as pre-punk--one can't say the same thing of _H to He . . ._).
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