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38 of 42 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The importance of preserving the 'American spirit'
My first impression upon reading this book is that it would make the perfect college text: concise, well-written, filled with wisdom, witty, and highly relevant to what most Americans care about--or should. Naturally, college professors will find themselves intrigued by this volume, maybe even be tempted to read it--but extremely unlikely to ever add it to their...
Published on August 22, 2000 by Michael J. Nyilis

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4 of 11 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Weak, simplistic interpretations, one-sided viewpoints
When I first read Tocueville's Democracy in America back at Fresno State University in 1984, I was struck with the superb and accurate analysis of American politics, culture, and society. Last week when I saw Ledeen's book, I was intrigued again and looked forward to more challenging, insightful analysis of the American character. However, don't let the elevated...
Published on July 17, 2000 by Granolatx


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38 of 42 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The importance of preserving the 'American spirit', August 22, 2000
My first impression upon reading this book is that it would make the perfect college text: concise, well-written, filled with wisdom, witty, and highly relevant to what most Americans care about--or should. Naturally, college professors will find themselves intrigued by this volume, maybe even be tempted to read it--but extremely unlikely to ever add it to their required reading lists. The reason is simple: Ledeen makes a strong case for the proposition that certain aspects of liberalism undermine the American character, a contention that most academics would either dispute with moral indignation--or argue would be a good thing. Readers would like to know if, first, Tocqueville accurately captures the American spirit--the character of her people--and, second, if Ledeen accurately represents the views of Tocqueville. On the first, I cannot think of a more discerning and brilliant commentator on the mentality of Americans, which is, of course, why we still read him and love to quote him. As for the second, it is clear that Ledeen is sensitive to even the most subtle nuances of Tocqueville's thinking, and he returns to Tocqueville's actual words again and again. Ledeen's chapter on "Religious Faith Anchored by Secular Institutions" is a superb analysis of the role religious faith in a secular society can play, and how it is vital to our character. His chapter on "Apostles of Freedom Tempted by Luxurious Tyranny" is exceptionally insightful and billiant. Ledeen is one of those large-minded conservatives who is deeply concerned about what he calls "our collective national mission," who celebrates what is best about America, but despairs at the forces which he sees as undermining it. Nearly every page contains useful insights and well-argued observations about what is happening to the American character. Tocqueville has found an commentator worthy of his brilliance.
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33 of 40 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Sloppy Implementation of a Brilliant Book Concept, December 13, 2000
By 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 124,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - See all my reviews
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Many people in America have not read Alexis de Tocqueville's brilliant analysis of the American character, as he experienced on his trip to the United States in 1826. That's too bad, because his work brilliantly defines what is different about American society from any other one on Earth. As an aristocratic Frenchman, perhaps it was easier for him to see us as we are, by seeing how different we are from Europeans, Canadians, and Mexicans.
The concept of the book is to summarize de Tocqueville, and then to test his observations against what has happened since. I have not seen that done before, and looked forward to seeing the results.
When Michael Ledeen is describing de Tocqueville, or political thinking of that time, the book is superb. If the book had stopped there, it would have been a five star book. So if you want to read it for that background, you will be well rewarded. Alternatively, you can read de Tocqueville directly. I would prefer the original, but either would serve.
In his contemporary commentary on America, Mr. Ledeen is basically giving us a political sociology analysis. For such work, it is helpful to have facts that look from various perspectives and dimensions. The first problem with this book is that Mr. Ledeen prefers to give just one anecdote or one fact, and build his observations from that. That approach works well for stimulating debate, but falls short of being convincing about our unique character. I found this approach very suspect.
Second, Mr. Ledeen prefers to always come at the problem from the perspective of being paranoid about losing our ideal character. I think his point of view is a valid one, but there are others. For example, one can also talk optimistically about how we routinely avoid certain traps (like having the best people decide to become politicians, or failing to use private institutions to serve important social needs). Those other perspectives are missing. The result is a book that seems like an anti-Democrat (as in the political party) rant in many places.
The third problem is that the book seems to have been weakly researched. Facts and details seem just a little out of focus, as though drawn from long-remembered impressions, rather than real knowledge or research.
For example, I rarely see Jack Welch's (the famous CEO of General Electric) name misspelled in any publication or book. But in this book, he was "Welsh" all the way through. Now, I believe Mr. Welch is an Irishman by background, so I don't think it's an accurate description of his familial history, either.
Then, the book goes on to describe his Mr. Welch's pronouncements of 1980 as creative destruction. The ideas that Mr. Welch advocated in that year were well established and broadly in application throughout American business when he pursued them. He primarily was advocating that the company stay in businesses in which it could be the leader or have the second place in market share. He solved the company's deficiencies by simply selling the lower market share operations, not by destroying them. For example, Utah International (a mining operation) was sold within months of his taking the helm. It was only later that Mr. Welch began to downsize the remaining General Electric operations to get rid of excess layers of bureaucatic fat.
The ideas Mr. Welch advocated later in his career were actually more important to General Electric's success, such as freeing General Electric Capital to be very entrepreneurial, focusing on leadership training, and implementing Six Sigma. So at best, Mr. Welch is misdescribed due to misfocus in Mr. Ledeen's example. At worst, Mr. Ledeen simply doesn't seem to grasp the example. There are several other sections of the book that display these kinds of fundamental flaws about contemporary observations.
As a result, I have to grade the analysis of current society somewhere in the two to three star range, creating an average of three and a half or four stars for the whole book.
After you finish reading this book, test its thesis by thinking about the evolution of American business. De Tocqueville did not have too much to say about that institution. Mr. Ledeen has somewhat more to say, suggesting it is an inheritor of the free association tendency of Americans. But I wonder if it is not something more. Is it not the case that business is replacing many of the other institutions in its effectiveness and broader social focus? Now that theme would make an interesting book.
Guard your liberty jealously, from all who threat it . . . including a greedy or thoughtless majority, sloppy thinking, or corrupt leaders. Trust must be earned.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Steppingstone to `Democracy in America', July 11, 2005
By 
Charles McVey "macvolant" (Huntington Beach, CA USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Tocqueville on American Character: Why Tocqueville's Brilliant Exploration of the American Spirit is as Vital and Important Today as It Was Nearly Two Hundred Years Ago (Paperback)
This is an excellent book for that person is not knowledgeable about what our American ancestors thought about the elements of American political life that are so debated now. Ledeen presents de Tocqueville's `Democracy in America' in a straight forward, easy to read style. If you like what you read here, go for the big time and read de Tocqueville's `Democracy in America' and you will be the richer for it.

The importance of de Tocqueville is that he presents an American character that made America great. Whether you are of the Right or the Left, you cannot help but compare those character traits with our current... well, you fill in what you will.

A negative with Ledeen's work is his loss of focus by deviating to address President Clinton. I regret to say that was out of place.
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35 of 52 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Yes, September 1, 2000
By A Customer
This is a fine book that makes accessible Tocqueville's writings. Clinton-lovers won't like this book, because Toqueville would have thought Clinton the worst thing that could happen to America, "A leader that gives Americans prosperity will have nothing more demanded of him." Which is why Americans have so stupidly overlooked Clinton treasonously selling our military technology to China, in exchange for campaign donations, as Ledeen illustrates clearly. An important book.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent book, analysis by Ledeen, July 6, 2014
Excellent book, analysis by Ledeen. ALL should know how deTocqueville analysed America, but his writing is very academic for mere mortals.
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5 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars yes, still relevant, November 17, 2002
By 
Benjamin Benda (Blaine, WA United States) - See all my reviews
A.M. Ledeen's A.Tocqueville 's analyses of American spirit - relevant today?
The original "Democracy in America" is a well known university source of reference even now .In 1826 a French nobleman A.de Tocqueville devoted himself to study the American ideas concerning life under American Democracy started 200 years ago by the Pilgrims. He found the American character did not fundamentaly change, and the success of America is a direct result of its principles, which remain stable even when circumstances change. Ledeen 's analyses of them in today's conditions ( he describes the important characteristics and ideals ) as alive and well. The dynamic mindset for continuous improvement is more then materialism. Initiative is a permanent state of mind, esteem of personal liberty results in individualism and deep religious conviction gives a base for morality in dealing with the neighbour.
Equality is taken for granted in spite of status or wealth. This is true in the west as well as the east where the original settlers started. Northern neighbour Canada, is different, regimented and respectful of old world systems even though the nature and climate are similar. Americans created something new an free, left behind old habits and goals. Having lived in Europe and Latin America it impressed me as liberated from burdens of superficial formality .
He detects that Americans drive for a change. Every generation adopts new discoveries, destroys the old system and obstacles ruthlesly, expecting their sons to do better then the fathers.However they do respect the basic principles. There has been a confirmation by many that America can stay good even if there are many risks.
Tocqueville's insights into the American worldview and its application by the wide public led him to forecasts and warnings about the future expressed in detail by Ledeen. The future developments will bridge over fads like American feminism, Africanism and other trends ,as well as views of "intellectuals" who are considering themselves culturally superior and try to influence the political elite . They are for controls of centralized state and, as one of the powers of the expanded state they advance, removal of religious discourse from public forum. Tocqueville found and the recent polls quted by Ledeen still confirm it, that that the overwhelming majority of Americans do not agree with the anti-religious intellectuals and judges. The advice is: religion is a guarantee of freedom, as his native France has tested by trying to supress it.
...
Ben Benda
.
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4 of 11 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Weak, simplistic interpretations, one-sided viewpoints, July 17, 2000
By 
Granolatx "Brad in Houston" (Houston, TX United States) - See all my reviews
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When I first read Tocueville's Democracy in America back at Fresno State University in 1984, I was struck with the superb and accurate analysis of American politics, culture, and society. Last week when I saw Ledeen's book, I was intrigued again and looked forward to more challenging, insightful analysis of the American character. However, don't let the elevated status of Toqueville's name begile you into thinking this is a work of another master. Ledeen dissapointed me greatly. He unfortunately takes events that he is interested in challenging, takes some quotes from the master, and attempts to suit his own intended outcome. For example, in an interesting discussion about American tycoons, Ledeen extols the virtues of good old fashioned competition with several anecdotes about self-made millionaires and billionaires, among them Carnegie, Gates, and Milken. Then, in a Faustian twist of sorts, he throws in two paragraphs about education, and how since the 60's, liberal thinking has taken competition out of education, and instead created a class of individuals who don't understand the concept of failure inherent in any competitive enterprise, especially the economy. Then in a surprise attack, he quotes General George Patten, that "the American people hate a loser." So 200 years of education are narrawed into two paragraphs! This sort of invalid syllogism happens over and over in Ledeen's book. He later reiterates (seemingly echoing the same tired mantra of Ollie North and Rush Limbuagh) how Bill Clinton undermined the national character, saying nothing of the overt character flaws in public officials throughout the past, including Bob Dole or Ollie North! It is a really pathetic attempt to take such a scholarly work as Tocquevilles and try to make out of context connections to today's so-called "national character." ...
Brad Pearl
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0 of 14 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Ha ha! An Israeli neo-conman writes about the 'American Spirit', November 29, 2009
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This review is from: Tocqueville on American Character: Why Tocqueville's Brilliant Exploration of the American Spirit is as Vital and Important Today as It Was Nearly Two Hundred Years Ago (Paperback)
I only bought this book becaue it only cost $2.00, and I knew it would be a joke anyway. I tried to keep an open mind while reading it, but found it little more than a re-hash of Toqueville's book albeit with a neo-con spin.
Ledeen by the way is widely suspected of orchestrating the 'Iraqi yellow-cake' rumor on behalf of his puppetmasters in the Israeli lobby.
Not a good choice of authors for this 'unextraordinary rendition' of a timeless classic...
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6 of 38 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Serves the Neo-Conservative agenda of distraction, January 15, 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: Tocqueville on American Character: Why Tocqueville's Brilliant Exploration of the American Spirit is as Vital and Important Today as It Was Nearly Two Hundred Years Ago (Paperback)
Written with a sickeningly sweet naivete which only a true believing romantic could appreciate. Ledeen seems to think there is no class system in America, that regardless of wealth all Americans accept each other equally, and that anyone can run and become president. I wasn't sure which planet he lived on until a few days later, his name came up on [...] under a search for "neo-conservative." The neo-conservative movement and the Project for the New American Century (PNAC) should be thoroughly reviewed by all voting Americans before the upcoming 2004 election. Searches on the web for these keywords should display some interesting results. Enough said.
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8 of 49 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars An easy an interesting read but, October 9, 2000
By A Customer
The first few chapters of Ledeen's efforts to demonstrate the relevance of Tocqueville today are interesting and fun to read. His attempts to draw from Tocqueville on the value of religion, the moral compass, in a democratic society are well written and enable the viewer to view the topic through a different and believable lens. His Tocquevillian analysis of the relative success of American society compared with others is cogent and convincing. Where Ledeen, unfortunately goes off the rails is when he tries to use Tocqueville to support his own political agenda.
Ledeen appears to dislike anything but minimal government who he hopes will spend huge sums on defense regardless of any reasonable analysis of the threat to the USA. He does not give any hint of an understanding of the inter-dependence of international economies or financial systems. He viciously attacks Clinton as an enemy of the American people, but ignores the threat to individual liberty and freedom the alternative posses to a woman's right to even make decisions over her own body. He deplores intellectuals, appearing to not appreciate that intellectuals have the role in society of questioning the unquestionable and theorizing without moving to action. Why does he think the first targets for all dictatorships are the universities and intellectuals? Who else would question whether the King has clothes?
I do support the right of Mr. Ledeen, a self professed political analyst, to promote his views, and after all he too is an intellectual who is trying to convince us that his "preordained pattern" is correct. However, to quote him again, "It is not so".
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