Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Color:
  • Together Is the New Alone
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
  • To view this video download Flash Player
      

Together Is the New Alone


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Audio CD, October 16, 2001
"Please retry"
$21.94

Hot Hot


Product Details

  • Audio CD (October 16, 2001)
  • Original Release Date: 2001
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Efa Imports
  • ASIN: B00005NYCA
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #874,420 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Slowly Sinking In
2. Awake On The Fifth Floor
3. In Spite Of Everything
4. Your New God
5. Daydream Belief
6. That Empty Feeling
7. And I Got Left Behind
8. Nothing, Still Nothing
9. Dry Retch
10. Always A Part

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com

On Together Is the New Alone, Donnacha Costello concocts sonic atmospheres that gently fill and alter whatever space they inhabit. The album creates a spare, slow-motion world where audio loops seem to float in the air, interacting with each other in ever-changing ways. On "In Spite of Everything," a sound hovers on the horizon like a glistening star; its luminescence dims as a keyboard part comes to dominate the track. Costello flirts with the silent/near-silent compositions of Francisco Lopez and Bernhard Guenter on the extremely low-volume "Daydream Belief." "Dry Retch" could be a sonic illustration of a gradually unfolding chemical or biological process. The album closes with the melancholy "Always a Part." When Costello lays down some beats a couple of minutes into the track, it's startling. After basking in Together's bliss chamber, "Always a Part" helps the listener transition back to the hubbub of the real world. --Fred Cisterna

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Roy Sablosky on February 6, 2004
Format: Audio CD
I've been listening to this album a lot in the last month or so. At first it made hardly any impression, but it got deeper and sweeter every time I heard it. The title is, I assume, a sardonic riff on 'Quiet Is the New Loud' by Kings of Convenience. Where that album is acoustic, this is electronic. And where that one is melancholy, this one is quite downbeat. Both albums share a lovely sense of minimalism -- never using two notes where one would do; never using two instruments where one (or none!) would do. Costello's album is never harsh or brutal or mean, but there is definitely a sense of despair running through it. But hey, that's part of the 21st century vibe. We can handle it. If you like Dub Tractor, you'll like this. And if you like Mokira, you'll like this -- though it's more minimal than Mokira. (If you can't imagine anything more minimal than Mokira, this is probably NOT the album for you.) I'm listening to it now and it's a lovely, lovely thing. By the way, Costello's previous album, 'Growing Up In Public', is also nice... but more conventional and less remarkable than this one. Peace.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Richard Yacuk on December 7, 2004
Format: Audio CD
This is about as quiet and minimal as sound and rhythm can possibly get and still be called "music." The rhythms are not much more than the tiniest of white noise and clicks, in the DSP tradition of electronic music of the late 90s and early 2000s. The synthesized sounds are gentle, repetitive, and never pretend to be anything more than synthesized sounds, nothing remotely sounding like a violin or piano. Only the closing track, "always a part" has a familiar sound, that of a very persistent electronic snare drum, layered on top of a repetitive synth progression so reminiscent of Eno's `Music for Airports.' The repetitive nature of the sounds reminds me somehow of the early music of the Cure, also at times touching on hopelessness and despair.

On his album "Together is the New Alone," Mr. Costello has done something unusual in that he's created an ambient music that describes a landscape, but that landscape is perhaps the internal emotional landscape of a hopeless and downtrodden person. Three months later and I simply cannot stop listening.

For more good recent ambient electronic, see also Loscil, "First Narrows"
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Audio CD
On TOGETHER IS THE NEW ALONE, Donnacha Costello creates an album of sublime beauty, pieced together from bits of melody and the silence that lies between the clicks and the blips. "Slowly Sinking In," the opening track, hums and reverberates to a slightly twitchy rhythm, while "Awake on the Fifth Floor" is like listening to a sunrise in the 24th century. And from the buzz of "In Spite of Everything" emerge some gorgeously melancholy piano chords and despite its 7-minute running time, it doesn't grow stale. "Daydream Belief" is subtle and hushed -- definitely a track for the headphones. "Nothing, Still Nothing" is reminiscent of Brian Eno's ambient work, while "Dry Retch" weaves a minimalistic spell. "Always A Part" closes the album with a glitchy drum `n' bass rhythm, layered through with haunting tones. A marvelous album.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Audio CD
I have this CD and enjoy it but can only give it 3 Stars because of 2 tracks that ruin the entire work completely. I read in Review that Track 5 is an experiment? What a disappointment, and such a blight for a promising release that simply stops in the middle of the CD with dead air that has me racing for the Forward button to avoid this pointless creative gap. Second is the awfully annoying and highly unnecessary addition of the beat track on the album closer. Why was it necessary to add this distracion when keeping it off this very beautiful, georgeous and haunting track off would have improved it 1000%? I don't often question Artist choices like this, but would foresight have made this a much more enjoyable CD in it's entirety to listen to?
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
0 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Rose Doyle on December 19, 2005
Format: Audio CD
Is this album really music? It has basically no tune or beat to it. If you like the sound of computers or robots you might like this but this is not for people who like melodies and beats in their music.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in