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  • Tokina AT-X116PRDXN AT-X PRO DX 11-16mm Ultra-wide Angle Lens for Nikon
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Tokina AT-X116PRDXN AT-X PRO DX 11-16mm Ultra-wide Angle Lens for Nikon

by Tokina
| 61 answered questions

List Price: $1,139.00
Price: $471.09 & FREE Shipping. Details
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  • Tokina AT-X116PRDXN AT-X PRO DX 11-16mm Ultra-wide Angle Lens for Nikon
15 new from $471.09 20 used from $429.95

Frequently Bought Together

Tokina AT-X116PRDXN AT-X PRO DX 11-16mm Ultra-wide Angle Lens for Nikon + Tiffen 77mm UV Protection Filter + Tiffen 77mm Circular Polarizer
Price for all three: $520.79

Buy the selected items together



Read about our customers' top-rated lenses and cameras on our review pages: Lenses, Digital SLR Cameras, Compact System Cameras

Product Details

  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 6 x 8 inches ; 1.2 pounds
  • Shipping Weight: 2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • ASIN: B0014Z5XMK
  • Item model number: ATX_11-16mm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (154 customer reviews)
  • Date first available at Amazon.com: October 2, 2001

Product Description

The new Tokina AT-X 116 PRO DX is an ultra-wide angle lens with a fast f/2.8 aperture for better photography in low-light situations. Many photojournalists consider having an f/2.8 aperture a must for any lens in their camera bag.

Based on the award-winning optical design of the AT-X 124 PRO DX (12-24mm f/4) lens, the new AT-X 116 PRO DX has a slightly shorter zoom range to maintain optical quality at wide apertures.

Tokina’s exclusive One-touch Focus Clutch Mechanism allows the photographer to switch between AF and MF simply by snapping the focus ring forward for AF and back toward the camera to focus manually. There is no need to change the AF-MF switch on Nikon cameras** and there is no second AF/MF switch on the lens for Canon, everything is accomplished by the focus ring.


Customer Questions & Answers

Customer Reviews

It is fast and sharp.
Zip Skip
Highly recommended to anyone looking for a new wide angle lens on a crop sensor camera.
johndav
First of all, it is very well build; heavy and solid feel in my hand.
Anthony V. Loh

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

344 of 346 people found the following review helpful By AWBoater on November 18, 2010
I actually bought this lens from Amazon as a kit, which included a 77mm low profile UV filter and camera cleaning kit. But since all of the reviews for this lens are here, I am posting my review here as well.

I was in the market for a super-wide angle DX lens, and I had originally considered a Nikon 10-24. Then I ran across this lens in several reviews that suggested the Tokina might be a great alternative. I own several Nikon lenses, and this is the first time I did not buy a Nikon lens.

I am really glad I bought the Tokina 11-16 lens.

My first consideration was the focal length. The reason I am purchasing the lens is for a super-wide angle, so the 10mm of the Nikon vs. the 11mm of the Tokina was the most important concern. Published specifications indicate a 109 Deg Field-of-View for the Nikon, and 104 Deg for the Tokina. Doing a bit of math suggests a 4% wider image for the Nikon.

But what does that really mean? I finally found a review on-line with the same photograph taken by the Nikon @ 10mm and the Tokina @ 11mm. You could tell the difference if you really looked at the photographs close, but placing the photographs next to each other, you really could not notice the difference when viewing them "casually". It might be that we naturally look to the center of a photo, but the size difference was not enough that it drew your attention to the corners.

For a practical example, take an 8x10 photograph and trim 1/4" from each of the 4 edges (you will end up with a 7.5 x 9.5" photo). This would be the difference between 10mm and 11mm. And as it turns out, 1/4" off each edge is about 4%.

With that realization, it put the Tokina in direct competition with the Nikon lens for my decision.
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134 of 141 people found the following review helpful By Sammy on January 2, 2009
This is the best wide-angle lens around for cameras with Nikon DX sized sensors. It's got great optical quality, and with a maximum aperture of f/2.8 it's faster than competing wide-angle lenses.

The only cautionary note I would add is that although the Tokina lens itself is built like a tank, Tokina lens caps seem to be less sturdy. At least, that's the conclusion I reached after the lens cap on my Tokina broke after my camera dropped a few inches onto a tatami mat in Japan. In looking at the broken cap, I wasn't too impressed by its construction with its tiny fragile looking, broken plastic clips. I now have a Nikon lens cap on the lens. If you get this lens, I suggest protecting your investment by buying a Nikon 77mm lens cap for it and ditching the one that comes with the camera.
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37 of 38 people found the following review helpful By Ben on May 14, 2011
I have a D5000, and I knew going in that this lens wouldn't autofocus on my body. I knew I would eventually upgrade to a camera body with an AF motor, and figured I could just manual focus until then.

Somewhere between pressing the 'buy' button and actually receiving my lens, I started to get very worried that, with only the small viewfinder to guide me, that I would think I was getting sharp shots but after loading them in my computer, find that they were slightly out of focus or soft.

After receiving the lens and taking it out for the day, my fears are completely erased. If you have a camera body without a focusing motor, but are still considering this lens, let me cast one vote in favor of this lens: Focusing will not be much of a problem, for a few reasons.

First, there is obviously a focusing distance scale, and it goes from 1-7 feet, and then infinity. Everything farther than 7 feet is infinity. This means the lens is going to stay on infinity 95% of the time.

Within 7 feet, it's fairly easy to judge the distance, and for the most part you can just set the focus distance and be fine. There is also the 'focus dot' in the viewfinder that tells you when you're in focus, and it in fact works quite well.

Just setting the lens to infinity and shooting landscapes and architecture, my images are every ounce as sharp as I hoped. In fact, it's so sharp that I kind of re-evaluated my opinion of what the D5000 can do. It really is all about the glass.
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59 of 66 people found the following review helpful By Eugene Fratkin on January 9, 2009
I have had this lens for about 6 month. It is an excellent lens. Construction is Nikon pro quality. It produces very good results with DX body at all apertures, of course a bit better stepped down. Edge performance is significantly better than 12-24 both Nikon and Tokina. It can also be used on a full frame cameras. I used it on D700. At 16mm it has insignificant levels of falloff in the corners, 15 is still usable.
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47 of 52 people found the following review helpful By Anthony V. Loh on February 27, 2010
I compared it with Nikkor, Sigma and Tokina's very own siblings before finally decided on this lens. I own a Nikon D300S an a D90.

It was perhaps one of the most sought after lens of the time; I have waited for months before finally received this Tokina 11-16mm f2.8 UWA lens. This review is written months after I owned it. I took it with me for a trip in Mt. Rainier National Park and also Acadia National Park.

First of all, it is very well build; heavy and solid feel in my hand. The weight balance well with the D300S, and not too bad with the D90.

Secondly, this lens has excellence IQ even at the largest aperture of f/2.8. The images from this lens are very sharp; at wide aperture, it gives you a nice mild smooth bokeh.

Third, it has a fast auto-focus. It performs very well even under low light condition.

This is a superb lens for taking landscape photos; however, because of the lens distortion, where nearer subject is closer to you and farther subject to farther from you, it is also excellence for taking photos with exaggerating effect. Having said that, people who haven't dealt with ultra wide angle (UWA) before would probably need a bit of practice especially when human subject is involved. I once asked a waiter to take a few group photos for us in a restaurant and the images came out are either with big face/small body or small head/fat body.

This is a great lens, and is intended to it's specific use. Two notes for people who want to buy this lens: -

1.) Unlike some other lenses, this lens has very limited range. If you need to be able to zoom in a bit closer, you need to compliment it with another lens. This is not a walk around lens.
2.) It does not have an internal motor.
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