Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Color:
Image not available

To view this video download Flash Player

 
Have one to sell? Sell yours here

Tokyo Story (The Criterion Collection) (1953)

Chishu Ryu , Setsuko Hara , Yasujiro Ozu  |  Unrated |  DVD
4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (98 customer reviews)


Available from these sellers.


Watch Instantly with Rent Buy
Tokyo Story (AKA Tokyo monogatari) (1953)   $2.99 $9.99
Tokyo Story   $2.99 $14.99

Other Formats & Versions

Amazon Price New from Used from
Blu-ray 2-Disc Version --  
DVD 2-Disc Version --  

Explore The Criterion Store

TV Deal of the Week
Interested in learning more about Criterion titles or the Criterion brand? Visit the Criterion Store to browse pre-orders, new releases, and best sellers. Shop now


Product Details

  • Actors: Chishu Ryu, Setsuko Hara, S Yamamura, Chieko Higashiyama, Haruko Sugimura
  • Directors: Yasujiro Ozu
  • Writers: Yasujiro Ozu, Kazuo Inoue, Kgo Noda, Kki Takaoka
  • Producers: Shizuo Yamanouchi, Takeshi Yamamoto
  • Format: Black & White, Color, NTSC, Special Edition, Subtitled
  • Language: Japanese (Dolby Digital 2.0 Mono)
  • Subtitles: English
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 2
  • Rated: Unrated
  • Studio: Criterion
  • DVD Release Date: October 28, 2003
  • Run Time: 136 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (98 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00005JLV7
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #63,257 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "Tokyo Story (The Criterion Collection)" on IMDb

Special Features

  • Disc one:
  • Newly restored digital transfer of film with improved subtitle translation
  • Audio commentary by Ozu-scholar David Desser, editor of Ozu's Tokyo Story
  • Original trailer
  • Disc two:
  • I Lived, but...(1983), a two-hour documentary about the life and career of Ozu
  • Talking with Ozu: a 30-minute tribute to Yasujiro Ozu, featuring directors Stanley Kwan, Aki Kurasmaki, Claire Denis, Lindsay Anderson, Paul Schrader, Wim Wenders, and Hsiao-Hsien
  • New essay by David Bordwell, author of Ozu and the Poetics of Cinema

Editorial Reviews

From the Back Cover

Tokyo Monogatari follows an aging couple, Tomi and Shukichi, as they journey from their rural village to visit their two married children in bustling, postwar Tokyo. Their reception, however, is disappointing: too busy to entertain them, the children send them off to a health spa. After Tomi falls ill, she and Shukichi return home, while the children, grief-stricken, hasten to be with her. Starring Ozu regulars Chishu Ryu and Setsuko Hara, the film reprises one of the director#s favorite themes##that of generational conflict##in a way that is quintessentially Japanese and yet so universal in its appeal that it continues to resonate as one of cinema#s greatest masterpieces.

Product Description

Yasujiro Ozu's Tokyo Story (Tokyo Monogatari) follows an aging couple, Tomi and Sukichi, on their journey from their rural village to visit their two married children in bustling, post-war Tokyo. Their reception, however, is disappointing: too busy to entertain them, their children send them off to a health spa. After Tomi falls ill, she and Sukichi return home, while the children, grief-stricken, hasten to be with her. From a simple tale unfolds one of the greatest of all Japanese films. Starring Ozu regulars Chishu Ryu and Setsuko Hara, the film reprises one of the director's favorite themes—that of generational conflict—in a way that is quintessentially Japanese and yet so universal in its appeal that it continues to resonate as one of cinema’s greatest masterpieces.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
83 of 84 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Are you kind to your parents? June 1, 2004
Format:DVD
Like many of Ozu's films, "Tokyo Story" ("Tokyo Monogatari") examines a very simple stage in life, one that I hope most of us will be lucky enough to encounter at some time or another. In this case, it is how we treat our parents once we no longer need them for survival. Are they a bother? Do we resent their old-fashioned ways and slower pace? Are we perhaps a bit too eager to shuffle them to the sidelines?
The story seems so simple, an elderly couple leaves the country to visit their children who have moved away to Tokyo. Country folk meet city folk, age meets youth, life meets death. There are no big blow-ups, no crisis points reached or contrived dramas, just life flowing along as it does. In Ozu's gentle hands, the entire story is told between the lines, with perhaps not a single sentence of direct dialog spoken in the film. Under the calm surface is an ocean of depth, emotions flowing with an unstoppable power, yet never able to breach the veneer of etiquette and politeness.
Ozu's usual cast in at their best. Chishu Ryu plays the father perfectly, flawed and kind, strict in his youth yet lenient in his old age, he is a father-figure more than a father to his impatient children. Chieko Higashiyama plays the kind and appreciative mother, much the same character as in "Early Summer." As always, Setsuko Hara, Japan's "Eternal Virgin," brings light and love into an otherwise dismal story playing Noriko, the widowed Daughter-in-law of Ryu and Higashiyama's son. Setsuko is ironically the only one of their children to appreciate the aged parents, even though she is not a blood-child.
"Tokyo Story" forced me to examine my own treatment of my parents, and consider how I will be treated when it is my time to visit my children.
Read more ›
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
43 of 43 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "None can serve his parents beyond the grave" July 15, 2006
Format:DVD
Often voted one of the greatest films of all time, Yasujiro Ozu's most famous film (made in 1953, but not released in the US until years later) follows an elderly couple as they leave their seaside town where they live with their youngest daughter, Kyoko, to visit their two eldest surviving children, Shige and Koichi, in Tokyo, stopping to meet their youngest son, Keizo, in Osaka along the way. Although their children seem to mean well, they are greatly inconvenienced by their parents' visit and do not take time off from work to show them around the city, instead asking their widowed sister-in-law Noriko to squire them about instead; Koichi's young sons treat his grandparents with sullen rudeness. Finally, Shige and Koichi dump their parents off at a hot springs resort not far from Tokyo, where the elderly couple feel out of place. On their return by train home, the mother becomes mortally ill, and the grief-stricken children and Noriko must come bury their mother and must face up to or ignore their previous treatment of her and their father.

Ozu considered his film a melodrama because it dealt more straightforwardly with life's tragedies and with grief than his other family dramas from his famed later period do. The film suggests a fairy tale, or King Lear, in that we, like the elderly couple, are positioned to judge the children and Noriko according to who is least and most filial; yet Ozu requires we see the selfishness of the children and the neglect of the parents in more complex terms. (Though this seems beyond the DVD's commentator, David Desser, whose intelligent technical shot-by-shot analysis of the film seems seriously marred by his willingness to engage in simplistic moral judgements of the characters.
Read more ›
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
85 of 91 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Never before have I been so moved by a film January 2, 2004
Format:DVD
Ozu's "Tokyo Story" is simply the most emotionally profound film I have ever seen. It is the sort of film that, after seeing it, may easily change you. I originally purchased the film because I was incredibly interested in the "Ozu style". There are many aspects of this little Japanese man's style, including shots of nature to break up the story, the tatami mat camera angle, the unmoving camera, and the shooting of characters speaking directly into the camera (which makes it all the more profound, it puts the viewer into the story). Ozu scarcely EVER drifted from this style, therefore it MUST have been quite incredible, for he never had the desire to change it. However, although I was compelled by the extremely elegant filmmaking style, it was the emotional impact that sticks with me the most. The story felt very slow as it unwound, with much of the dialogue feeling very small talk-ish. However, despite the fact I was initially disappointed by this small talk-like dialogue, by the end, I realized this slowness of developement made the end all the more powerful. This ending was so powerful that I was completely in tears for the final half hour or so of the film. This film was SO profound that I felt moved upon viewing it. Near the end of the picture, when one of the daughters stated "Life is too short." I was moved. I felt compelled to go out and live it up, for life IS too short. I also realized that I need to be much kinder to my parents, for they give me so much, and they will not be around forever. As is said in one of the more famous and compelling lines from the film, "One cannot serve his parents from beyond the grave".
You will be moved beyond words by one of the greatest films of all time, Yasujiro Ozu's "Tokyo Story"
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Recent Customer Reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars "life's disappointing isn't it"
Great movie about children neglecting their parents.the movie stars two beautiful and talented actress,setsuko hara and kyoko kagawa. Read more
Published 23 days ago by asianman
5.0 out of 5 stars Tokyo Story
A classic love story that will never grow old. Sensitive, yet strong in how family dynamics can evolve. Read more
Published 1 month ago by Dimas Chavez
5.0 out of 5 stars very strong
A very tough treatment of a very real issue, not just in our time, but for all ages. Families. How can we live with them? How could we possibly live without them?
Published 4 months ago by Richard Johnson
5.0 out of 5 stars ONE OF THE GREATEST MOVIES EVER MADE!
Ozu was a genius. He seems like a really simple fellow but when it came time to make a film, stand back!

Greg Altum, Sweetwater, TN.
Published 6 months ago by Gregory A. Altum
2.0 out of 5 stars Great film, lousy DVD quality.
Wonderful film, beautiful story. But there was a problem with the DVD... and I wasn't able to watch the film all the way through. I had to pay the postage myself to return it... Read more
Published 8 months ago by tpolson
3.0 out of 5 stars review
This was sort of interesting. I liked the settings of seeing the interior of Japanese homes in the 1950s and the various personalities of the characters, which are believable. Read more
Published 8 months ago by Kitty
5.0 out of 5 stars Time capsule of post WWII Japan
Fabulous cinematography and directing. Great story. Great antidote to the stylized, artificial movies of today. Great preparation for my mother's visit to us in a few weeks.
Published 9 months ago by Kenneth B. Rowe
5.0 out of 5 stars A beautiful movie
Tokyo Story was a revelation. Thanks to the Story of Film, an Odyssey, i am watching the movies that Mark Cousins recommends. This is one of the best. Read more
Published 9 months ago by Gloria
5.0 out of 5 stars An Immortal Story
The films of Yasujiro Ozu were not exhibited in the United States until the late 1960s, though he was one of Japan's most honored and significant filmmakers. Read more
Published 11 months ago by Anthony Sol
5.0 out of 5 stars Arigato, Mr. Yasujiro Oju. Arigato.
I can honestly say that Tokyo Story is one of the saddest and most poignant movies ever made. It is also a cinematic masterpiece of framing, editing, and pacing. Read more
Published 11 months ago by Anthony L.
Search Customer Reviews
Search these reviews only


Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 



Look for Similar Items by Category