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  • Tom Douglas by Pinzon Kai 7-Inch Stainless-Steel Santoku Knife
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Tom Douglas by Pinzon Kai 7-Inch Stainless-Steel Santoku Knife


Currently unavailable.
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  • 7-inch Japanese-style cook’s knife for thinner slicing and dicing
  • Made of high-carbon stainless steel for superior edge retention
  • Blade is honed to a "shaving-sharp" edge
  • Nonslip black polymer handle provides control, comfort, and reduced hand fatigue
  • Dishwasher-safe; made in Japan

Product Details

  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds
  • Shipping: This item is also available for shipping to select countries outside the U.S.
  • ASIN: B001VNC63Y
  • Item model number: 9950TD
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #331,342 in Kitchen & Dining (See Top 100 in Kitchen & Dining)
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Product Description

From the Manufacturer

Award-winning chef-restaurateur Tom Douglas, renowned cutlery manufacturer Kai, and Amazon.com introduce a line of superior cutlery that will inspire home chefs and build confidence in the kitchen. This 7-inch santoku is a Japanese cook's (or chef's) knife, featuring a low-tip style with a broad blade. The cutting edge is minimally curved, so it provides less rocking action than a European-style cook's knife. For straight-down, ultra-thin slicing and precise chopping, it's superb. Tom Douglas by Pinzon cutlery is made of high-carbon stainless-steel for excellent edge retention, and each blade is honed to a shaving-sharp edge. Co-polymer handles, with bolsters, provide a comfortable grip and reduce hand fatigue. Combine this versatile santoku with other knives in the Tom Douglas by Pinzon line, including the chef’s knife, paring knife, bread knife, and boning knife, all manufactured by Kai. These knives are safe for the dishwasher.

Kai kitchen knives have a 700-year history, with a lineage dating back to Japan’s famous samurai sword-making city of Seki. One principle, nokaji (blacksmith's) spirit, has been consistently upheld by Kai. "The nokaji strives to make blades that are suited to the daily lives of people by bringing to bear on the task all his craftsmanship and all his heart."

Tom's Tips

  • The santoku is better than a chef’s knife for ultra-thin slicing of less-dense vegetables such as onions and mushrooms.
  • The texture of this knife’s handle provides great control.
  • Never scrape a knife across the cutting board. Scraping dulls your knife quickly. Gather your prep with a board scraper.

About Tom Douglas

Tom Douglas is an American chef, restaurateur, and writer. He is well known for helping to define Northwest cuisine and igniting the Seattle restaurant scene, winning the James Beard Award for Best Northwest Chef in 1994. Since 1989, Tom has opened five of Seattle’s most popular restaurants: Dahlia Lounge; the Greek-inspired Lola; Serious Pie pizzeria; Palace Kitchen; and Pike Place Market’s iconic seafood restaurant, Etta’s. He also owns Dahlia Bakery, famous for its Triple Coconut Cream Pie.

Tom is the author of Tom Douglas' Seattle Kitchen, named Best American Cookbook by the James Beard Foundation, Tom's Big Dinners, and I Love Crab Cakes! He bested Masaharu Morimoto in an episode of Iron Chef America and was named 2008 Bon Appétit Restaurateur of the Year.

Tom is currently working with Amazon.com on an exclusive line of kitchen and dining products, aimed at building confidence in the kitchen.

Visit the Tom Douglas by Pinzon Store to browse his full line of Tom Douglas by Pinzon products, discover Tom's all-time favorite cookbooks, and find delicious recipes to make with his kitchen products.

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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See all 17 customer reviews
The handle is also very nonslip.
Values Privacy
So sharp right out of the box and cuts thin even slices without any effort.
FatOrangeTabby
Bottom Line: Great knife at a great value.
John N. Schëar

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

41 of 44 people found the following review helpful By Joe MacBu VINE VOICE on February 9, 2010
Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I've been using this knife for a few weeks and am sort of ambivalent about it. Part of the problem is that I had looked at it as a general purpose knife, for which I don't think it's that suitable. I think it's better used as a specific-purpose knife, mainly for cutting very thin slices. Based on this, it's difficult to characterize a trait of this knife as being an advantage or disadvantage. Pay attention to the manufacturer's product description above, because almost every critique I've listed below has been addressed in the description as a feature. It'll help you decide whether this is the knife for your needs.

Why it's not good for general purpose knifework:

* The knife is very light and the blade is very thin. So you don't get the heft to cut through big chunks of tough things, like root vegetables. Normally I'd think this knife was of inferior quality, but since it's apparently made by a very reputable manufacturer and the lightweight and thinness is touted as a feature, what do I know? I'm waiting to see how long the edge holds up and how well it takes to sharpening.

* The shape of the blade doesn't allow for smooth rocking. I realize it's not a chef knife, but I'm able to use a smooth rocking motion with my other santoku-style knives. This knife is very ill-suited for this task.

* Not good for those who like to grip the blade. I'm used to handling a knife by gripping the base of the blade with my fingers while resting the base of my palm on the handle. This blade is thin and the top portion has right-angles which haven't been smoothed off. So, after using the knife for a few minutes, it really irritates my hand. I've resorted to grasping the handle only, but I lose a lot of fine control in this position.
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By ringo TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on January 26, 2010
Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
In Japanese, "Santoku" means, roughly, "three benefits". And the Santoku blade is designed to provide just that: a long flat belly and wide blade, like the cleaver-shaped Nakiri, for coarse-chopping or thin-slicing vegetables; a rounded tip, like the European chef's knife (or its Japanese Gyuto equivalent), so you can rock the blade on the tip for fine mincing; and a deep bolster-less base, like the Japanese Deba, for dealing with the small bones of chicken and fish.

Most Santoku knives made for the American market get the blade shape right, but not the handle or the balance - for a Nakiri-style cutting motion, where you push the blade down and forward, you want to choke up on the blade, with your first finger and thumb gripping the spine of the blade itself, and have the balance point of the knife in front of the handle (easy with a Japanese-style stick handle, but not with typical full-tanged European molded grip). This knife actually gets it right.

Kai is a Japanese company, and, admirably, it has avoided the trap of most Santoku knives sold in the US - this is not just a funny-shaped chef's knife. The knife really works as a Nakiri, and is pretty decent for mincing and slicing as well. The balance (forward) and heft (not too much) are appropriate.

Out of the box, the blade really is sharp enough to shave with. The handle, though softer than I anticipate from a knife (not quite Oxo soft, but close), will work well in slippery and wet situations. (I don't know how well the blade will resharpen - I'll update this review when I get to it).
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A. Reader VINE VOICE on February 2, 2010
Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Pros:
Sharp right out of the box.
Great Edge Geometry.
Amazing price.
The handle practically sticks to your hand.
It just slices, chops and cuts well.

Negatives:
Not rigid enough for my tastes, just a little too much bend.
Does not have the dimples of traditional Santoku knives, so things can 'stick' a bit.
No balance. Not as important for the rocking motion of a Santoku, but its unsettling to feel so little wait in the handle of a 7 inch knife.

Overall:
This is a lot of knife for this price. Amazing Value. The minor shortcomings pale in comparison to what youre getting for a knife at this price. Perfect for someone who wants something better than you can find at most Discount stores but doesn't want to break the bank. It doesn't look nearly as nice as my Shun Santoku and doesn't balance well, but I'd wager its better than 90% of kitchen knives you'd find in most peoples kitchens and nearly all you'd find at this price point. (A note aside to steel junkies: Nowhere on the blade does it say anything other than High Carbon Steel, but I'd wager these are AUS6A, based on the Kershaw Site.)
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By John N. Schëar VINE VOICE on February 2, 2010
Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
June 6, 2012 Update
Just a quick note regarding this knife. It has been two years and the Pinzon is my "go to knife" for most of the kitchen work I do. It performs perfectly for slicing meats sandwich thin. The blade has withstood many cuts and remains as sharp today as when originally opened. I use the steel on it before I begin and after three or four swipes it is ready for whatever I hit it with. Still a top quality blade for a super good price.

At first glance I was underwhelmed but I was wrong by a long shot. When I opened the meager package my expectations were less than normal. The knife itself was minimal at best but that was before a closer inspection. Having all the attributes of an American I did not read the instructions first. There were none. But, as it turns out, I needed none. I checked the blade and handle for defects. None. I checked the blade's edge for sharpness. It was dull or at least I thought so until I used it.

After washing it off with sudsy soap (redundant?) and water, rinsing well and drying, I put it to the tests. I started with a hot turkey breast. Hot is more difficult to cut thin slices than cold. This cut the breast with ease and the pieces were quite thin. I subsequently cut the breast while it was cold and the slices were much thinner than all the other knives I have in my arsenal. Can one have a knife in an arsenal?

In between I cut veggies and they were a snap and completed with ease. Try it, you'll like it. Then came the beef. Slicing a 4 pound rump roast was slick as cutting butter. Really! I especially like the thinness of the blade.
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