Tom Horn 1980 R CC

Amazon Instant Video

(143) IMDb 6.9/10
Available in HD

Steve McQueen stars as a legend brought to life in this story of a great American hero battling a gang of cattle rustlers in turn-of-the-century Wyoming.

Starring:
Steve Mc Queen, Billy Green Bush
Runtime:
1 hour 38 minutes

Available in HD on supported devices.

Tom Horn

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Tom Horn

Price: $11.87

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Product Details

Genres Drama, Western, Romance
Director William Wiard
Starring Steve Mc Queen, Billy Green Bush
Supporting actors Richard Farnsworth, Billy Green Bush, Slim Pickens, Peter Canon, Elisha Cook Jr., Roy Jenson, James Kline, Geoffrey Lewis, Harry Northup, Steve Oliver, Bill Thurman, Bert Williams, Bobby Bass, Mickey Jones, B.J. Ward, Richard Brewer, Mel Novak, Tom Tarpey
Studio Warner Bros.
MPAA rating R (Restricted)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Rental rights 24 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

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Customer Reviews

Get it, you'll like it, ya hear!
Adrian
Based on the book 'I, Tom Horn', this movie is one of the best westerns I have ever seen.
elffriend48
Steve McQueen gives a very believable performance as frontier hero, Tom Horn.
T O'Brien

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

103 of 106 people found the following review helpful By Barron Laycock HALL OF FAME on August 5, 2000
Format: VHS Tape
One of the final few movies Steve McQueen (along with the little watched film version of Ibsen's "An Enemy Of The People") made before succumbing to cancer was this fine and under appreciated movie based on the historical facts surrounding the exploits, exploitation, trial and hanging of a man who wound up being the comparatively innocent "fall guy" caught in the middle of a number of clashing and rapidly changing social institutions of the American West. Horn is a gunman, drifter and marksman with a considerable reputation, and when he moseys into town the cattle ranchers see him as the key to their otherwise insoluble problems in settling their long-standing dispute with the sheepherders. Tom rids them of their problems, and in doing so is neatly set up to take the fall for a murder he didn't commit. Yet for the sake of everyone but Horn, convicting him makes considerable sense. Thus, he is railroaded, and he never stands a chance of exoneration.
This is a wonderful if disturbing true story well told, and the cast is absolutely superb and on-key with tone-perfect minimalist acting that avoids being coy or too traditional, and McQueen, for all his health problems, delivers a bravura performance as a man caught by time and circumstance in a world he neither understands nor appreciates, and he does a wonderful job in conveying the stoical resignation with which this simple man accepts his unfair fate with dignity and maturity. The cinematography is absolutely breath-taking, and the size and grandeur of the surrounding scenery helps the viewer to understand just how significantly the small people like Tom Horn were in wresting the West from the wilderness it was to become part of so-called civilized and "citified" America. This is one you don't want to miss. Enjoy!
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52 of 54 people found the following review helpful By Reviewer on June 13, 2000
Format: VHS Tape
A dramatization based on the true story of a legendary frontiersman, "Tom Horn" depicts the final years in the life of this tracker, interpreter and hero of the Apache Wars. Steve McQueen portrays Horn, who drifts into Wyoming Territory in 1901. There he makes the acquaintance of cattle rancher John Coble (Richard Farnsworth), who brings Horn's presence to the attention of the "Cattlemen's Association." There's been an ongoing problem with rustlers, not to mention the encroachment of sheep ranchers, and the association has been endeavoring to find a solution. In Horn, whose reputation precedes him, they see the answer to their problems, much to the consternation of Marshall Joe Belle (Billy Green Bush), who feels slighted in the matter; his ego, it seems, is even more pronounced than his own reputation. They hire Horn as a "Stock Detective," and give him free rein as to how he must deal with cattle rustlers; whether to shoot, or bring them in, is entirely up to him. In little more than a year's time, the rustling has stopped; Horn has done his job well. Too well, in fact. It seems that he's become a bit too "high profile," and after an incident in town, during which Horn kills a man in self defense, the members of the association, as well as Joe Belle, conclude that Horn is now their biggest problem. The last thing they want is to have their names appearing in newspapers, connecting them in any way with Horn or any of the recent killings. They want to be rid of him, and for good, but they don't know how to go about it. Soon thereafter, on one of the nearby sheep ranches, a fifteen-year-old boy is shot and killed in cold blood, by a rifle shot from a distance of two hundred and thirteen yards.Read more ›
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33 of 34 people found the following review helpful By Trevor Willsmer TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on May 6, 2007
Format: DVD
Soldier, Indian tracker, lawman, outlaw, hired killer - there are about a half dozen movies that could be made about Tom Horn, so it's surprising that it wasn't until the Western was on its last legs that, aside from the odd fleeting appearance in B-movies, he finally made it to the big screen. In some ways it's amazing he made it at all. 1980's Tom Horn was a troubled picture, and that's putting it mildly. Sam Peckinpah was at one time tapped to direct, but he fell out with star and producer Steve McQueen before shooting started - possibly literally, since McQueen's alleged response to a furious argument they had in the car one evening led to McQueen insisting he get out without bothering to stop first. Neither Don Siegel nor Elliot Silverstein made it past pre-production. Electra Glide in Blue director James Guercio only lasted for the first three days of the shoot, and cinematographer John Alonzo and McQueen himself also had a hand in the finished film at one point or another, with credited director William Wiard apparently hired only to placate the Directors Guild when they wouldn't allow the star to direct himself. The screenplay went through many changes along the route as well, with Thomas McGuane's 450-page epic being constantly chipped away, Abraham Polonsky's rewrite being rejected and Bud Shrake's final script eventually alternating with McGuane's depending on which version the star felt like filming that day. And just to add to the good news, the picture suffered from major budget cuts due to studio politics and the threat of a William Goldman-scripted Robert Redford rival project (eventually made for TV with David Carradine as Mr Horn), shrinking from a three-hour $10m epic about the Indian tracker and interpreter's life to a $3m small-scale Western about its ignominious end.Read more ›
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