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Too Many Tomatoes, Squash, Beans, and Other Good Things: A Cookbook for When Your Garden Explodes Paperback – April 2, 1991

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Carrot Cake

Serves 8

2 cups flour
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon nutmeg
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1 1/2 teaspoons baking soda
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 cups oil
2 cups sugar
4 eggs, slightly beaten
2 cups grated raw carrots
1 cup drained crushed pineapple
1 cup chopped nuts
8 ounces cream cheese, at room temperature
1 box confectioner's sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
12 tablespoons butter or margarine, at room temperature

Sift together into large bowl.

Mix together and add to dry ingredients.

Add to batter. Pour into greased Bundt pan and bake 1 hour at 325º. Or use greased 13-by-9-inch pan for 30 to 35 minutes.

Cream together, and frost cake when cool.

To decorate, wash and dry a carrot with greens still attached and lay on top of cake.

Spanakopitta

Serves 12-18

8 cups chopped spinach
1 onion, minced
4 tablespoons butter
2 tablespoons flour
1 cup milk
5 eggs, beaten 1 pound feta cheese, crumbled (or other mild white cheese, grated)
Dash of nutmeg and cinnamon
8 ounces phyllo pastry sheets
1/2 cup butter, melted

Sauté 4 to 5 minutes.

Stir in flour, then gradually add milk and stir until thickened. Remove from beat.

Stir in until smooth.

In 11-by-14-inch sheet pan, brush and layer 8 sheets with butter. Add filling and repeat with 8 more layers. Bake at 350º for 30 minutes. Cut into squares.

Cut this Greek delicacy into small squares and serve as hot hors d'oeuvre. Remember, when working with phyllo, to keep unused pastry sheets moist by covering with a damp towel.

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 287 pages
  • Publisher: HarperPerennial (April 2, 1991)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0060968575
  • ISBN-13: 978-0060968571
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 0.8 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (27 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #210,154 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

39 of 42 people found the following review helpful By H. Grove (errantdreams) TOP 500 REVIEWER on April 13, 2004
Format: Paperback
I love the *idea* of this cookbook. It presents chapters organized alphabetically by garden vegetable. Each chapter includes notes on growing and harvesting the vegetable, yield information, a few nutritional notes, information on storage, freezing, cooking, basic preparation, and complementary herbs. The freezing information is perhaps the most useful, in my mind. The one truly great piece of information I got out of this cookbook is that you *can* freeze and then reheat potato dishes, as long as you don't thaw them first; most cookbooks will just tell you that you can't do this. (However, it doesn't give any instructions as to which sorts of dishes work well for this and which don't--and believe me, some work *much* better than others. Let's just say that if you want to freeze potato dishes, freeze ones in which the potato is in as mashed and creamy a state as possible, with few chunks.)
The recipes themselves are all over the map in terms of quality, and lean very heavily on fatty dairy products to make them flavorful--which means that they won't be very useful to vegans or folks on a diet (two major groups of people who are going to want to make heavy use of vegetables in their diet). Most of them also don't use a huge amount of the vegetable in question, and don't state whether they freeze well or not (and if they do, how to alter the cooking instructions for the frozen dish), which means that these recipes aren't any more useful for the cookbook's stated purpose than those in other cookbooks. The only advantage is that in here they're organized by vegetable, and, well, that's what an index is for in other cookbooks. You'd be better off with a copy of the Joy of Cooking--it covers all the vegetables as well, and the recipes are of much more consistent quality.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By "jcsf1" on August 10, 2003
Format: Paperback
I bought this book at least 20 years ago, when I first started cooking. I originally bought it to find ways to use produce received from a neighborhood co-op. As a result I learned ways to cook items that I thought I did not like. Now, many of my favorite recipes are from the book.
Over the years, I used this cookbook so much it literally fell apart. So, I was thrilled to see it available on Amazon.com. Now I have a nice new copy.
I consider it an essential cookbook for any cook. The recipes range from classic to unique - all are easy to make; none too fancy.
It's a winner.
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Format: Paperback
I have been using this cookbook for all most 20 years. My friend, who is a gourmet cook and gardener, gave me the book. My paperback copy is in pieces. My daughter decided to give me another copy which she got from Amazon. I made sure the page with the pumpkin bread and pumpkin pie were in the hardback cookbook, but I don't plan on getting rid of the paperback copy any time soon. Also, I need to say, I have an extensive cookbook library - The Favors of Bon Appetite 1994-2004, The Colonial Williamsburg Tavern Cookbook, The Best of Cooking Light, The Complete Cooking Light Cookbook, King Arther Flour Baking Companion, The American's Test Kitchen Family Cookbook, American Test Kitchen Live!, Cooking Illustrated 2002-2011, Southern Living Annual Recipes 1990-2006, Meals That Heal, Canibel-Capitive Islands Restaurants & Recipes, and Discover Dayton to name a few. This is the only one that is in pieces. Of course, the copy I have is a paperback. That is until my daughter purchased a new/used copy for me. I recently told a friend. She is also purchasing a copy. Some of the recipes needed a few changes, but over all, I use it a lot.
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Format: Paperback
Inevitably if you have planted a few zucchini plants, couple of rows of carrots, some tomatoes, in the middle of summer you find yourself with a bounty of vegetables and you are loss on how to cook them all before they go bad. Lois Landau and Laura Myer's cookbook leaps into the fray and saves you from culinary paralysis. They have gathered together a range of simple recipes. The instructions are straightforward and geared toward the cook who wants to prepare meals expediently. The layout is easy to follow, with the recipe in a column on the left, and the instructions on a parallel column on the right.

You will everything from snap bean fritters to zucchini bread (of course) to onion pudding to curried green tomatoes and more. The chapters are arranged by vegetable, and the authors cover the 21 most common ones that a home garden would have. In addition to those in the title, they include cabbage, cucumbers, eggplant, lettuce, potatoes, turnips and more.

This a fantastic book to have when you are contemplating a garden that has produced more vegetables than you knew you could eat.
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By J. Stamm on August 8, 2008
Format: Paperback
I have owned this book for about nine years now, and every summer when the garden really starts to produce it comes back off of the cookbook shelf. Some of my particular favorites are the Fresh Cream of Tomato Soup and the Eggplant Minestrone, which both freeze well if made in large quantites. The Chocolate Zucchini Cake is also very good. In fact there are a lot of good recipes for zucchini and who isn't looking for zucchini recipes when they grow them - one or two plants produce so much. My mother got used to this book when I still lived at home and helped my father grow a garden. Now she has to keep borrowing it to make her favorites. I have also shared some of my favorites with other family members and cowokers who have all been impressed with the variety and quality of the recipes.
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